SBUX - Starbucks Corporation

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
90.07
-1.49 (-1.63%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

89.67 -0.40 (-0.44%)
Pre-Market: 4:44AM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close91.56
Open91.61
Bid89.54 x 2200
Ask90.47 x 3000
Day's Range90.06 - 92.08
52 Week Range54.71 - 99.72
Volume9,951,288
Avg. Volume7,054,542
Market Cap107.814B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.52
PE Ratio (TTM)32.20
EPS (TTM)2.80
Earnings DateOct 30, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield1.44 (1.58%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-08-07
1y Target Est96.33
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Bitcoin Is Growing Up as Deliverable Futures Start Trading
    Bloomberg

    Bitcoin Is Growing Up as Deliverable Futures Start Trading

    (Bloomberg) -- Bitcoin is growing up.Monday marks the debut of futures contracts offered by Intercontinental Exchange Inc. that can result in delivery of the digital currency, a new chapter in Bitcoin’s tumultuous 10-year history. The first federally regulated market to buy and sell Bitcoin could entice conservative investors who have so far stayed on the sidelines to begin adding the digital asset to their portfolios, according to industry analysts. It also furthers efforts to create a market structure for financial professionals to take the digital asset seriously.“The move to centralize and create a scalable infrastructure for crypto asset investment” is “a positive step,” said James Putra, head of product strategy at TradeStation Crypto. Because the ICE contracts will deliver actual Bitcoin, an investor can potentially profit first from the rise in the futures price and then take possession of the coins, he said. “I can capture both pieces and continue to ride that upward.”Bitcoin has risen 177% this year, better than any other asset globally. The start of cash-settled futures contracts at CME Group Inc. in December 2017 helped send Bitcoin up 9% and coincided with its record price of $19,511.It hasn’t been all smooth sailing for the ICE contract. The company faced a months-long delay after running into opposition from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission over how it proposed to store clients’ tokens to safeguard them from theft and manipulation, people familiar with the matter said earlier this year. To remedy this, the company sought a license from New York financial regulators permitting its Bakkt custody unit to hold customer tokens. That unit began operating earlier this month to give users a chance to become familiar with how it works.“This contract is squarely designed for institutional participants,” said Adam White, chief operating officer of Bakkt. The combination of regulated trading with custody is what sets the ICE approach apart, he said. “That is of the utmost importance to institutions.”How They WorkThe company is offering a daily contract as well as a 30-day future. The daily contract will be available for investors to buy or sell for 70 days into the future, while the monthly will be listed for 12 months out, he said. Both contracts can be rolled upon expiration, he said.As for the delay ICE faced, White said “That was time well spent” because the company needed to address customer concerns about how their Bitcoin would be stored. “To us, it was not a race for speed but to get the right product out.” It’s rare in the futures industry for a market to act as an exchange for trading, a clearinghouse for settlement and a custodian for delivery. The last component is what necessitated Bakkt receiving the New York state trust license.Damon Leavell, an ICE spokesman, declined to name the banks supporting ICE’s Bitcoin futures contract. Bank units known as futures commission merchants stand between customers and the clearinghouse to facilitate trade.Completing the regulated custody “does add another layer of legitimacy to the market,” said Richard Johnson, an analyst at Greenwich Associates who specializes in blockchain technology. Bitcoin custody is risky because private keys are needed to move coins from one address to another. If a thief obtains that key he now controls that Bitcoin, Johnson said. There’s also the risk of losing the keys, he added.Retail DeliveryThe main competitor to the ICE Bitcoin futures will be the CME Group contracts. CME Group earlier this month said it will boost the number of contracts users can hold in the spot month and last week said it would begin options on its Bitcoin futures contracts in the first quarter next year, pending regulatory review.“There’s room for both” CME and ICE contracts, TradeStation Crypto’s Putra said. A key for ICE will be devising a way for retail customers to easily buy and sell the futures, he said. Many retail brokerages aren’t set up to handle delivery of corn or cattle from a futures trade, so don’t allow those contracts on their systems, he said.“People make mistakes,” he said. “It’s not easy to have a truckload of cattle to get to a customer.” The ICE daily contract could help firms that make short-term loans of Bitcoin, he said. Now they can hedge those loans, which tend to be one day in duration due to the wild volatility seen in Bitcoin’s price.Starbucks, MicrosoftWhen ICE unveiled its Bitcoin futures plan in August 2018, it highlighted it in part as a way for merchants to adopt cryptocurrencies as a payment method. Its corporate partners include Starbucks Inc. and Microsoft Corp. Yet retail adoption of Bitcoin may still be a ways off, Putra said.“It lays the groundwork to make it easier for other participants to adopt this,” he said of the ICE plan. Yet “it’s a lofty goal” to get corporations to begin changing Bitcoin into U.S. dollars. “It’s a bit of a leap to think Starbucks is going to manage its position through futures,” Putra said. “If I’m not managing my dollar or yen exposure with a futures contract, I’m not going to manage my Bitcoin exposure with a futures contract.”White said the first hurdle for the company was to get enough traders using its Bitcoin futures. If they can pull that off, next year ICE plans to offer a product aimed at merchants, he said.(Adds ICE comment in the 9th paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Matthew Leising in Los Angeles at mleising@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael J. Moore at mmoore55@bloomberg.net, Dave Liedtka, Brendan WalshFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Apple May Get Clues About Its Chances of Winning Tax Case of the Century
    Bloomberg

    Apple May Get Clues About Its Chances of Winning Tax Case of the Century

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc. may only need to wait until Tuesday to get early clues about its chances of success in the biggest tax case in recent history.The iPhone maker has been arguing its case at the European Union’s General Court to topple a record 13 billion-euro ($14.3 billion) EU tax order. This week the same panel of judges will deliver a ruling on two smaller but related challenges by Starbucks Corp. and a Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV unit.They’re the first in a series of cases to come to a decision as companies rail against EU Competition chief Margrethe Vestager’s five-year crackdown on allegedly unfair tax deals.While the facts of the various appeals differ significantly, Tuesday’s decisions “should have a far-reaching impact, both on the other pending cases and going forward,” said Howard Liebman, a tax partner at law firm Jones Day in Brussels, who isn’t involved in the disputes.The judges’ stance will “presumably establish some precedent as to how far the court is willing to allow the commission to extend its approach of judging tax regimes -– and individual tax rulings –- in the context of a state-aids analysis,” he said.Vestager’s ProbesAppeals have been piling up at the EU courts since state-aid investigators started work in 2013 to unearth what they deem to be the most problematic examples of otherwise legal individual tax agreements doled out to companies by countries. The judges’ verdicts could empower or halt Vestager’s probes, which are now centering on fiscal deals done by Amazon.com Inc. and Alphabet Inc.Starbucks and Fiat were targeted on the same day in 2015 by a similar EU order to pay back about 30 million euros each over their tax arrangements in the Netherlands and Luxembourg respectively.The commission decisions accused Luxembourg and the Netherlands of granting so-called tax rulings to the companies that backed “artificial and complex methods” to calculate their taxable profits but that didn’t reflect “economic reality.”The EU said at the time the companies did this by setting prices for products and services sold between units -- called transfer prices -- that didn’t reflect market conditions. “As a result, most of the profits of Starbucks’ coffee roasting company are shifted abroad, where they are also not taxed, and Fiat’s financing company only paid taxes on underestimated profits.”Back TaxesLuxembourg has since also been ordered to recoup 250 million euros from Amazon.com and 120 million euros in back taxes from energy utility Engie SA, France’s former natural-gas monopoly, previously known as GDF Suez.In the Apple case, the EU said Ireland illegally slashed the iPhone maker’s tax bill between 2003-2014, a finding the company and Irish officials don’t accept.The EU alleged that “Apple paid essentially no tax on earnings in Europe” and “sought headlines by quoting tiny numbers, but this public campaign ignores the taxes Apple pays all across the world,” Apple attorney Daniel Beard said at last week’s hearing.The Dutch finance ministry said it had nothing to add to previous statements criticizing the EU’s approach. Fiat Chrysler, Apple and the commission declined to comment, as did the Luxembourg and Irish finance ministries. Starbucks didn’t immediately return requests for comment.EU nations ordered to claw back the allegedly illegal tax aid have accused the commission of overreaching itself by using state aid law to attack individual fiscal arrangements that dated back many years. A key question for the commission in the cases is whether its argument that these tax rulings were selective and unfair stands up in court.“The commission did not identify a single instance where a taxpayer was treated less favorably than Apple,” Paul Gallagher, a lawyer for Ireland, told the judges in the court hearings last week.Luxembourg, which has so far faced the brunt of the EU’s decisions, has attacked the “arbitrary nature” of the commission’s approach which creates “complete legal uncertainty,” their lawyer Denis Waelbroeck said in a court hearing about Fiat’s case last year. Ireland and Luxembourg have supported each other in their respective appeals.The cases are T-636/16 - Starbucks and Starbucks Manufacturing Emea v. Commission, T-755/15 - Luxembourg v. Commission, T-759/15 - Fiat Chrysler Finance Europe v. Commission, T-760/15 - Netherlands v. Commission,\--With assistance from Peter Flanagan, Daniele Lepido and Ruben Munsterman.To contact the reporter on this story: Stephanie Bodoni in Luxembourg at sbodoni@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Aarons at aaarons@bloomberg.net, Peter ChapmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • NYSE Parent Launches Physical Bitcoin Futures Contract
    Investopedia

    NYSE Parent Launches Physical Bitcoin Futures Contract

    Real-world bitcoin trading will now be a reality through ICE, the Intercontinental Exchange which owns the New York Stock Exchange, among others. Bitcoin futures traders can now place bets in physically settled derivative products, as of September 22, 2019. The platform, launched under a new company called Bakkt, will leverage Microsoft cloud solutions to create an open and regulated, global ecosystem for digital assets.

  • EU court ruling on Starbucks, Fiat million euro tax orders on September 24
    Reuters

    EU court ruling on Starbucks, Fiat million euro tax orders on September 24

    Europe's second-highest court will rule on Sept. 24 whether Starbucks Corp has to pay up to 30 million euros ($33 million) in Dutch back taxes and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV a similar amount to Luxembourg. Both cases are part of European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager's crackdown on unlawful tax breaks offered by EU countries to multinationals that have drawn criticism for using the bloc's state aid rules to assess tax strategies commonly used by many companies. The judgments from the Luxembourg-based General Court could determine the scope of Vestager's drive in the coming years and whether she will open more cases.

  • MarketWatch

    Starbucks launching a location just for mobile orders

    Starbucks Corp. is launching a new store format, Starbucks Pickup, that will be exclusively for Rewards members who use the mobile-order-and-pay option. New York City members can place their orders in the app, select the Penn Plaza location, and their order will be on a status board when they arrive. Baristas will be available to help. The system resembles the Starbucks Now express service store that launched in Beijing this summer. Luckin Coffee Inc. , a Starbucks competitor in China, also has stores with limited seating. Starbucks stock has rallied 40.6% for the year to date while the S&P 500 index is up 19.6% for the period.

  • Starbucks (SBUX) Stock Moves 0.66%: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Starbucks (SBUX) Stock Moves 0.66%: What You Should Know

    Starbucks (SBUX) closed the most recent trading day at $91.56, moving +0.66% from the previous trading session.

  • Darden (DRI) Earnings Surpass Estimates in Q1, Sales Miss
    Zacks

    Darden (DRI) Earnings Surpass Estimates in Q1, Sales Miss

    Darden Restaurants (DRI) first-quarter fiscal 2020 results gain from new restaurant opening and surge in blended comps.

  • Barrons.com

    36 Stocks to Buy if the Value Rotation Fizzles Out

    When momentum stocks blew up, everyone got excited about the possibility that it would be value’s turn to shine. But with the Federal Reserve cutting interest rates, there’s a good chance that investors will just go back to buying what has worked.

  • Starbucks & Alibaba Team Up to Offer Voice Ordering in China
    Zacks

    Starbucks & Alibaba Team Up to Offer Voice Ordering in China

    Starbucks (SBUX) partners with Alibaba to offer voice ordering and delivery to its Chinese customers.

  • Is Starbucks (SBUX) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?
    Zacks

    Is Starbucks (SBUX) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

    Is (SBUX) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

  • 3 Large-Cap Dividend Stocks to Buy After Fed Cuts Interest Rates for Second Time
    Zacks

    3 Large-Cap Dividend Stocks to Buy After Fed Cuts Interest Rates for Second Time

    We searched, using our Zacks Stock Screener, for large-cap dividend stocks investors might want to buy after the U.S. Federal Reserve cut interest rates for the second time...

  • Coffee On Speaker: Starbucks Teams Up With Alibaba To Offer Voice Ordering In China
    Investor's Business Daily

    Coffee On Speaker: Starbucks Teams Up With Alibaba To Offer Voice Ordering In China

    Starbucks is teaming up with Alibaba to offer Chinese customers smart speaker voice ordering and delivery.

  • When To Buy Growth Stocks: How Pyramiding Up Can Be As Easy As A Cup Of Coffee
    Investor's Business Daily

    When To Buy Growth Stocks: How Pyramiding Up Can Be As Easy As A Cup Of Coffee

    Knowing when to buy growth stocks is a fine skill. Starbucks' breakout in 2010 and Shake Shack in 2018 show how to use the pyramiding technique.

  • Bloomberg

    Apple Fights ‘Phantom’ Units Claim in $14 Billion EU Court Clash

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc. and Ireland’s court room clash with the European Commission finally lived up to its billing as the world’s biggest tax case.A two-day hearing into their appeal of the EU’s record 13 billion-euro ($14.4 billion) tax bill heated up on Wednesday as Apple rebutted claims that Irish units at the center of its fight are just “phantoms” and Ireland hit back at regulators for saying the country would willingly forgo one-fifth of its corporate tax takings.Ireland is the victim of "wholly unjustified criticism of its tax system and its approach" from the EU in "the biggest state aid case ever," said Paul Gallagher, the government’s lawyer, in closing arguments of an EU General Court hearing in Luxembourg.EU officials "have not produced to this court a single example of Apple being preferred to anyone else" and Irish tax law didn’t require Apple to pay any more.Apple and Ireland are battling the European Commission’s 2016 order that ruled illegal a tax deal that saw the company channel sales through two Irish units. The iPhone maker is the biggest target of EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager’s crusade against corporate tax deals that allow big firms to reduce their fiscal burden.Irish BranchesThe five-judge panel homed in on the exact functioning of the Irish branches that allowed Apple revenues to be covered by a national tax deal labeled as illegal by regulators.The EU asserts the units received selective tax treatment that allowed Apple to allocate all sales profits to two companies that “existed only on paper.” Apple attempted to show that each business wasn’t a ghost while saying strategic decisions over products and sales were made elsewhere and profits should also be taxed elsewhere.“This wasn’t some kind of shell company, this was a company doing things in the U.S.,” Apple’s lawyer Daniel Beard responded, citing one of the firms. He said that no critical decisions on intellectual property were made in Ireland.Marc van der Woude, a Dutch judge and the court’s vice-president, had quizzed the EU’s lawyer late Tuesday on what evidence the European Commission had to show whether the Apple units determined strategy or drew up business plans.The business "looks like a phantom company,” he said at one point. Other judges dug into details of how the branches were run and how the Irish government determined that the revenue should be taxed there.The EU’s lawyer Richard Lyal sought to dismiss Apple’s arguments that the revenue at stake should have been taxed in the U.S. where its products are developed."Apple should not now pretend" that its Irish units "make all that money but that only a tiny proportion of it should be attributed to Ireland," he told the court. "All arguments as to tax being paid in the U.S. are completely irrelevant."Amazon, AlphabetA court ruling, likely to take months, could empower or halt Vestager’s tax probes into complicated corporate structures used by many American technology firms. The EU has also scrutinized fiscal deals done by Amazon.com Inc. and Alphabet Inc. and may draft new rules to net digital companies’ revenue.The first hints of how the Apple case may turn out will come from a pair of rulings scheduled for Sept. 24.The General Court will rule on whether the EU was right to demand unpaid taxes from Starbucks Corp. and a Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV unit. Those judgments could set an important precedent on how far the EU can question tax decisions national governments make on how companies should be treated.To contact the reporters on this story: Aoife White in Luxembourg at awhite62@bloomberg.net;Stephanie Bodoni in Luxembourg at sbodoni@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Aarons at aaarons@bloomberg.net, Peter Chapman, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • MarketWatch

    Starbucks launches voice ordering in China with Alibaba smart speaker

    Starbucks Corp. said Wednesday that it has partnered with Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. to launch voice ordering in China with Alibaba's smart speaker, Tmall Genie. The Starbucks virtual store sells a Starbucks-themed version of the speaker. Deliveries arrive within 30 minutes. Starbucks and Alibaba have been partners for one year and have collaborated on a number of programs to grow the coffee business in China. The voice ordering program uses Alibaba's Ele.me on-demand food delivery platform, which was introduced earlier this year. Starbucks stock has rallied almost 65% over the past year. Alibaba shares are up 14.3%. And the S&P 500 index is up 3.5% for the period.

  • Autumnal Equinox 2019: When Is the First Day of Fall?
    InvestorPlace

    Autumnal Equinox 2019: When Is the First Day of Fall?

    The autumnal equinox 2019 is quickly approaching and it will bring with it all the makings of fall.Source: Bas Meelker / Shutterstock Anyone looking forward to the autumnal equinox 2019 will want to note Sept 23. on their calendars. That's less than a week away and is the first day of the fall season. The date isn't the same every year, with it ranging from Step. 21 to Sept. 24.So what exactly do we have to look forward to with the autumnal equinox 2019? First off, the days are going to start getting shorter and the nights will get longer. There will also be a drop in temperature as we approach the winter season.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsIt's also worth noting that pumpkin spice is going to be a dominating force throughout the season. There are already plenty of stores that are selling the scent and flavor. Among those is Starbucks (NASDAQ:SBUX) with its PSL and another new drink for the season.Outside of drinks and food, the autumnal equinox 2019 also puts us that much closer to sports season. We're going to see several leagues, including the NFL and the NBA, start up during the fall, which is great news for sports fans. * 7 Momentum Stocks to Buy On the Dip InvestorPlace is also getting in on the autumnal equinox 2019 celebrations this year. We've put together a collection of quotes to share on social media that represent our feelings on the season. You can check it out by following this link. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Momentum Stocks to Buy On the Dip * 7 Dow Titans Breaking Higher * 5 Growth Stocks to Sell as Rates Move Higher As of this writing, William White did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities.The post Autumnal Equinox 2019: When Is the First Day of Fall? appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Financial Times

    Dawi aims to become Egypt’s medical ‘Starbucks of clinics’ chain

    “We brainstormed and talked to doctors, and it started growing on me that this was a really interesting idea to which I could bring my experience in brand building and operations management,” says Ms Habib, co-founder and chief executive of Dawi Clinics. Sitting in the seventh and latest branch of Dawi to open in Cairo in the densely-populated district of Shobra, Ms Habib explains that within months of the conversation with Mr Iskander, she plunged into preparations for an affordable healthcare company aimed at middle class families. The pair then teamed up with Mairose Doss, a doctor and Dawi’s third co-founder, and raised an undisclosed amount from private investors in their first round of funding.

  • Actress Shailene Woodley: Plastics have caused a true ocean, marine crisis
    Yahoo Finance

    Actress Shailene Woodley: Plastics have caused a true ocean, marine crisis

    Actress and environmental activist Shailene Woodley joins Yahoo Finance to chat about her efforts to rid the world of harmful plastics in oceans.

  • Apple Takes on EU’s Vestager in Record $14 Billion Tax Fight
    Bloomberg

    Apple Takes on EU’s Vestager in Record $14 Billion Tax Fight

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc. fights the world’s biggest tax case in a quiet courtroom this week, trying to rein in the European Union’s powerful antitrust chief ahead of a potential new crackdown on internet giants.The iPhone maker can tell the EU General Court in Luxembourg that it’s the world’s biggest taxpayer. But that’s not enough for EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager who said in a 2016 ruling that Apple’s tax deals with Ireland allowed the company to pay far less than other businesses. The court must now weigh whether regulators were right to levy a record 13 billion-euro ($14.4 billion) tax bill.Apple’s haggling over tax comes after its market valuation hit $1.02 trillion last week on the back of a new aggressive pricing strategy that may stoke demand for some smartphones and watches. The company’s huge revenue -- and those of other technology firms -- have attracted close scrutiny in Europe, focusing on complicated company structures for transferring profits generated from intellectual property.A court ruling, likely to take months, could empower or halt Vestager’s tax probes, which are now centering on fiscal deals done by Amazon.com Inc. and Alphabet Inc. She’s also been tasked with coming up with a “fair European tax” by the end of 2020 if global efforts to reform digital taxation don’t make progress.“Politically, this will have very big consequences,” said Sven Giegold, a Green member of the European Parliament. “If Apple wins this case, the calls for tax harmonization in Europe will take on a different dynamic, you can count on that.”Vestager showed her determination to fight the tax cases to the end by opening new probes into 39 companies’ tax deals with Belgium on Monday. The move addresses criticism by the same court handling the Apple challenge. A February judgment threw out her 2016 order for them to pay back about 800 million euros.At the same time she’s pushing for “fair international tax rules so that digitization doesn’t allow companies to avoid paying their fair share of tax,” according to a speech to German ambassadors last month. She urged them to use “our influence to build an international environment that helps us reach our goals” in talks on a new global agreement to tax technology firms.Apple’s fury at its 2016 EU order saw Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook blasting the EU move as “total political crap.” The company’s legal challenge claims the EU wrongly targeted profits that should be taxed in the U.S. and “retroactively changed the rules” on how global authorities calculate what’s owed to them.The U.S. Treasury weighed in too, saying the EU was making itself a “supra-national tax authority” that could threaten global tax reform efforts. President Donald Trump hasn’t been silent either, saying Vestager “hates the United States” because “she’s suing all our companies.”“There is a lot at stake given the high-profile nature of the case, as well as the concerns that have been raised from the U.S. Treasury that the investigations risk undermining the international tax system,” said Nicole Robins, a partner at economics consultancy Oxera in Brussels.Apple declined to comment ahead of the hearing, referring to previous statements. The European Commission also declined to comment. Ireland said it “profoundly” disagreed with the EU’s findings.Richard Murphy, a professor at London’s City University, said the EU’s case “is about making clear that no company should be beyond the geographic limits of tax law.”“Selective attempts to get round the law -- which is what tax avoidance is -- are unacceptable when companies seek the protection and support of that same law” in the rest of their business,” Murphy said.Vestager has also fined Google some $9 billion. She’s ordered Amazon to pay back taxes -- a mere 250 million euros -- and is probing Nike Inc.’s tax affairs and looking into Google’s taxation in Ireland.The first hints of how the Apple case may turn out will come from a pair of rulings scheduled for Sept. 24.The General Court will rule on whether the EU was right to demand unpaid taxes from Starbucks Corp. and a Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV unit. Those judgments could set an important precedent on how far the EU can question tax decisions national governments make on how companies should be treated.“It’s very clear that the largest companies in the world -- the frightful five I call them -- are hardly paying taxes,” said Paul Tang, a socialist lawmaker at the European Parliament. “Cases like these, Amazon in Luxembourg or Apple in Ireland, started to build public and political pressure” for tax reform in Europe.The legal battles may go on for a few years more. The General Court rulings can be appealed once more to the EU’s highest tribunal, the EU Court of Justice. Meanwhile, Apple’s back taxes -- 14.3 billion euros including interest -- sit in an escrow account and can’t be paid to Ireland until the final legal challenges are exhausted.For Alex Cobham, chief executive of the Tax Justice Network campaign group, the issue is already in the past and “it’s not even the biggest tax scandal that Apple has” after reports on other structures it may use. Tax reforms under discussion “will ensure much closer alignment of taxable profits and the real economic activity” generated by them.The cases are: T-892/16, Apple Sales International and Apple Operations Europe v. Commission, T-778/16, Ireland v. Commission.(Updates with Vestager comment in seventh paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Stephanie Bodoni in Luxembourg at sbodoni@bloomberg.net;Aoife White in Brussels at awhite62@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Aarons at aaarons@bloomberg.net, Peter ChapmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Shopify, Chipotle, Paycom Among 7 Big Winners That Just Triggered This Long-Term Sell Rule
    Investor's Business Daily

    Shopify, Chipotle, Paycom Among 7 Big Winners That Just Triggered This Long-Term Sell Rule

    While the Dow Jones nears highs, Shopify, Chipotle, Paycom, Starbucks, McDonald's, Alteryx and Universal Display triggered a long-term sell rule last week.

  • Starbucks (SBUX) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Starbucks (SBUX) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Starbucks (SBUX) closed at $90.48, marking a -1.72% move from the previous day.

  • Starbucks appoints execs from Dominos, Nike, Apple to board
    American City Business Journals

    Starbucks appoints execs from Dominos, Nike, Apple to board

    Starbucks' 13-member board is led by former chairman and CEO of J.C. Penney Co. Myron Ullman III.

  • Kiplinger

    10 Top Stocks That Show Gender Diversity Counts

    Data shows that if you want to generate alpha and outperform the major indexes, some of the top stocks to buy are companies that practice gender diversity.Catalyst, the global nonprofit dedicated to building workplaces for women that work, has done exhaustive research into why diversity and inclusion matter. Among its findings: * Companies pay something of a self-imposed penalty for lack of diversity. That is, those companies that poorly practice gender and ethnic/cultural diversity were 29% less likely to experience profitability above the industry average. * A study of U.S. companies in the MSCI World Index between 2011 and 2016 found that "companies beginning with at least three women on their boards produced median gains of 10% ROE and 37% Earnings Per Share" over the five-year period. Companies with fewer women on their boards delivered less growth in these two important metrics. * A 2016 study by Intel and Dalberg Global Development Advisors found that tech companies that practiced diversity had higher revenues, profits, and market value than those that didn't. According to the study, diversity was worth $320 billion-$390 billion in increased market value by closing the gender gap in leadership.In short, investing in gender-diverse stocks isn't just a moral stance - it's financially rewarding. For investors looking for ways to get in, here are 10 top stocks that show gender diversity counts. SEE ALSO: All 30 Dow Stocks Ranked: The Analysts Weigh In

  • Top Consumer Discretionary Stocks for 2019
    Investopedia

    Top Consumer Discretionary Stocks for 2019

    In the booming economy of 2019, consumer discretionary stocks were skyrocketing until they weren’t. Here is a brief rundown of a few of the top stocks in this sector for this year.

  • The world’s most viral robot just praised Starbucks for closing its wage gap
    Yahoo Finance

    The world’s most viral robot just praised Starbucks for closing its wage gap

    Viral robot Sophia applauded Starbucks for the methods the company used to address the gender pay gap.