SMCI - Super Micro Computer, Inc.

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
15.65
-3.88 (-19.87%)
At close: 3:57PM EDT
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Previous Close19.53
Open19.55
Bid0.00 x 1000
Ask0.00 x 1000
Day's Range19.02 - 19.68
52 Week Range8.50 - 23.04
Volume92,911
Avg. Volume81,942
Market Cap780.652M
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.92
PE Ratio (TTM)12.13
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target EstN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of SMCI earnings conference call or presentation 17-May-19 1:00pm GMT

    Q3 2019 Super Micro Computer Inc Earnings Call

  • Markit

    See what the IHS Markit Score report has to say about Super Micro Computer Inc.

    Super Micro Computer Inc OTC Markets Group INC(NQB):SMCIView full report here! Summary * ETFs holding this stock are seeing positive inflows * Bearish sentiment is low Bearish sentimentShort interest | PositiveShort interest is extremely low for SMCI with fewer than 1% of shares on loan. This could indicate that investors who seek to profit from falling equity prices are not currently targeting SMCI. Money flowETF/Index ownership | PositiveETF activity is positive. Over the last month, ETFs holding SMCI are favorable, with net inflows of $1.11 billion. Additionally, the rate of inflows is increasing. Economic sentimentPMI by IHS Markit | NeutralAccording to the latest IHS Markit Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) data, output in the Technology sector is rising. The rate of growth is weak relative to the trend shown over the past year, however. Credit worthinessCredit default swapCDS data is not available for this security.Please send all inquiries related to the report to score@ihsmarkit.com.Charts and report PDFs will only be available for 30 days after publishing.This document has been produced for information purposes only and is not to be relied upon or as construed as investment advice. To the fullest extent permitted by law, IHS Markit disclaims any responsibility or liability, whether in contract, tort (including, without limitation, negligence), equity or otherwise, for any loss or damage arising from any reliance on or the use of this material in any way. Please view the full legal disclaimer and methodology information on pages 2-3 of the full report.

  • Super Micro will move chip production out of China to avoid spying claims
    Engadget

    Super Micro will move chip production out of China to avoid spying claims

    Server maker Super Micro is moving production out of China in a bid to allay US customer's concerns about spying, even though independent tests have shown no evidence of cyber espionage. The company has also announced its plans to expand its own in-house manufacturing facilities to help mitigate any perceived risks. A spokesperson for the company said Super Micro wants to be more self-reliant "without depending only on those outsourcing partners whose production previously has mostly been in China."

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of SMCI earnings conference call or presentation 14-Feb-19 10:00pm GMT

    Q2 2019 Super Micro Computer Inc Earnings Call

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of SMCI earnings conference call or presentation 15-Nov-18 10:00pm GMT

    Q1 2019 Super Micro Computer Inc Earnings Call

  • Supermicro says outside investigator found no evidence of Chinese spy chips, disputing Businessweek
    CNBC

    Supermicro says outside investigator found no evidence of Chinese spy chips, disputing Businessweek

    Supermicro CEO Charles Liang said a third-party firm has evaluated and cleared the company's motherboards. The company's stock tumbled after a Businessweek article published Oct. 4 stated the company had allowed the Chinese government to plant microchips that could be used for spying onto motherboards bound for American tech companies Apple and Amazon.

  • Supermicro says investigation firm found no spy chips
    TechCrunch

    Supermicro says investigation firm found no spy chips

    Supermicro has sent a letter to its customers saying that it has found no evidence of malicious chips on its motherboards. The company asked third-party company Nardello & Co to audit Super Micro’s hardware. On October 4, a Bloomberg report claimed that China’s spies managed to conceal tiny malicious chips on Supermicro motherboards.

  • Bloomberg

    Super Micro Says Third-Party Test Found No Malicious Hardware

    The conclusion follows previous denials of a Bloomberg Businessweek magazine report that said Chinese intelligence services inserted malicious components in the company’s server motherboards during the manufacturing process. The company said the third-party investigations firm had tested "a representative sample" of its motherboards, including the specific type of components which were the focus of the Businessweek story and which had been purchased by a number of large technology companies mentioned in that article, as well as more recently manufactured examples. Bloomberg Businessweek has previously said that it stands by its story.

  • Reuters

    Super Micro says review found no malicious chips in motherboards

    Computer hardware maker Super Micro Computer Inc told customers on Tuesday that an outside investigations firm had found no evidence of any malicious hardware in its current or older-model motherboards. In a letter to customers, the San Jose, California, company said it was not surprised by the result of the review it commissioned in October after a Bloomberg article reported that spies for the Chinese government had tainted Super Micro equipment to eavesdrop on its clients. Super Micro had denied the allegations made in the report.

  • Super Micro to review hardware for malicious chips
    Reuters

    Super Micro to review hardware for malicious chips

    A Bloomberg report on Oct. 4 cited 17 unidentified sources from intelligence agencies and businesses that claimed Chinese spies had placed computer chips inside equipment used by about 30 companies, including Apple Inc and Amazon.com Inc and multiple U.S. government agencies, which would give Beijing secret access to internal networks. Super Micro denied the allegations made in the report. It is entirely plausible that a malicious chip can be placed on a motherboard but it will be at a very high cost, and the risk of detection increases with every such chip in the field, said Jake Williams, a former National Security Agency analyst and founder of the cyber security firm Rendition Infosec.