SNY - Sanofi

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
46.06
-0.02 (-0.04%)
As of 3:04PM EST. Market open.
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Previous Close46.08
Open46.31
Bid46.07 x 900
Ask46.08 x 900
Day's Range45.97 - 46.33
52 Week Range40.00 - 47.47
Volume845,859
Avg. Volume1,537,931
Market Cap115.384B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.47
PE Ratio (TTM)23.74
EPS (TTM)1.94
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield1.74 (3.77%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-05-07
1y Target Est52.00
  • Not Much Chemistry Between Sanofi (SNY) and Hedge Funds
    Insider Monkey

    Not Much Chemistry Between Sanofi (SNY) and Hedge Funds

    It is already common knowledge that individual investors do not usually have the necessary resources and abilities to properly research an investment opportunity. As a result, most investors pick their illusory “winners” by making a superficial analysis and research that leads to poor performance on aggregate. Since stock returns aren't usually symmetrically distributed and index […]

  • Regeneron Reports Positive Data on Rare Blood Disorder Drug
    Zacks

    Regeneron Reports Positive Data on Rare Blood Disorder Drug

    Regeneron (REGN) announces positive top-line data from a phase II study on rare blood disorder drug.

  • Benzinga

    Najarian Brothers Highlight Unusual Option Activity In Sanofi, JetBlue And More

    On CNBC's "Fast Money Halftime Report," Jon Najarian said traders were aggressively buying the December $15.50 calls in Teck Resources Ltd (NYSE: TECK ) on Wednesday. They picked the $15.50 strike, ...

  • Sanofi agrees to sell Seprafilm to Baxter for $350 million
    Reuters

    Sanofi agrees to sell Seprafilm to Baxter for $350 million

    Medical supply company Baxter International Inc said on Monday it had agreed to buy Sanofi's Seprafilm unit, which makes specialist surgical products, for $350 million in cash. France's Sanofi is conducting a broad strategy review undernew chief executive Paul Hudson, who will give some initialpointers on which businesses he wants to focus on at an investorday on Dec. 10. "As part of our ongoing strategic transformation, we are refocusing our established products portfolio to allow for focus on key growth platforms," a spokesman with Sanofi said.

  • Reuters

    REFILE-UPDATE 1-Sanofi agrees to sell Seprafilm to Baxter for $350 mln

    Medical supply company Baxter International Inc said on Monday it had agreed to buy Sanofi's Seprafilm unit, which makes specialist surgical products, for $350 million in cash. France's Sanofi is conducting a broad strategy review under new chief executive Paul Hudson, who will give some initial pointers on which businesses he wants to focus on at an investor day on Dec. 10. Sanofi took on Seprafilm, which is used to help manage bleeding in abdominal and pelvis operations, in 2011 as part of its purchase of Genzyme.

  • Heart Drugs Are Having a Moment
    Bloomberg

    Heart Drugs Are Having a Moment

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Drugmakers have spent years de-emphasizing heart medications in favor of higher-priced treatments for cancer and rare diseases. As America enters its most caloric season, it looks like that is starting to change, for now. Novartis AG made a particularly large commitment Sunday with its $9.7 billion purchase of Medicines Co. and its promising new cholesterol drug. Meanwhile, biotechnology company Amarin Corp.’s bet on its fish-oil-derived capsule Vascepa is starting to pay off: Its shares soared earlier this month after a Food and Drug Administration panel recently suggested the pill — which was shown to cut cardiac risk in a huge trial last year — be made available to millions of additional patients. Heart medicines are also key pipeline components or sales drivers at a number of big pharmaceutical companies as well, from Merck & Co. and Bayer AG to Pfizer Inc.Investment in cardiac medicines is positive for patients and public health; after all, heart disease remains the most significant cause of death in the U.S. There’s a reason that drugmakers had backed away, however. These companies will have to navigate a harsh market environment to keep this mini-renaissance alive. Effective heart disease medicines, including statins for cholesterol and drugs for high blood pressure, have become much cheaper as generic options have hit the market. That’s excellent for patients and health budgets, as expanded use of these drugs has been impactful enough to  slow Medicare spending growth. But it makes things difficult for newer, higher-priced medicines to make inroads. Next-generation drugs need to prove they can add something on top of or substantially outperform cheaper options to have a chance at anything but niche success. They sometimes still struggle even if they do. Cardiovascular drugs take time to have an impact, and the American health-care system isn’t patient.  People change health insurance all the time as they swap or lose jobs, pick a new plan, or have one selected for them. Health plans often focus on annual costs and don’t always want to pay extra for an uncertain benefit that might eventually save someone else money. That tendency is most pronounced in large markets, where rapid uptake of a new drug translates into substantial spending increases.Two relatively new cholesterol drugs — Praluent, from Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceutical Co., and Amgen Inc.’s Repatha —  are the most significant recent cautionary tales. They were both approved in 2015 with high expectations and are effective medications, but the market balked at their high price and threw up barriers to access. The result was a glacial launch. Sales remain sluggish even after major price cuts.  Medicine Co.’s inclisiran lowers cholesterol at a similar rate by using the same drug target as those medicines but requires far less frequent dosing. Novartis will have to find out whether convenience is enough to command a premium price and avoid the same commercial fate. As for Amarin, a drug-price watchdog called Vascepa a rare cost-effective option for heart disease earlier this year. That doesn’t guarantee a rapid ascent to blockbuster sales. The drug’s future is partially in the FDA’s hands. The exact language of the agency’s expanded approval will help determine how many new patients will get access. The bigger part is arguably once again up to health plans. They will decide how strictly to interpret the FDA’s guidelines, and whether patients will have to jump through hoops to get the medicine. The size of the potential patient population may inspire them to clamp down, cost-effectiveness be damned. The barriers to heart drugs are navigable. Novartis was likely inspired to pay up for Medicines because it managed the feat with its heart-failure treatment Entresto. Sales of the drug started extremely slowly, but are now growing at a respectable clip. There is a clear opportunity in this somewhat neglected space. Profiting from it might require a high risk tolerance and an extra measure of patience. To contact the author of this story: Max Nisen at mnisen@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Max Nisen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering biotech, pharma and health care. He previously wrote about management and corporate strategy for Quartz and Business Insider.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Alnylam Gets Second Product Approval Amid Stiff Competition
    Zacks

    Alnylam Gets Second Product Approval Amid Stiff Competition

    Alnylam (ALNY) gets FDA approval for givosiran injection for subcutaneous use to treat adults with acute hepatic porphyria. Givosiran injection will be marketed by the trade name of Givlaari.

  • Esperion's Promising Drugs Under Review, Funds a Concern
    Zacks

    Esperion's Promising Drugs Under Review, Funds a Concern

    Esperion's (ESPR) regulatory applications for bempedoic acid monotherapy and combo seeking approval for lowering LDL-C are under review. However, absence of adequate funds may jeopardize the launch.

  • Business Wire

    Consumers File Class-Action Lawsuit Against Makers of Zantac, According to Consumer-Rights Law Firm FeganScott

    Two consumers filed a class-action lawsuit claiming pharmaceutical giants GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and Sanofi (SNY), among others, failed to warn consumers that the heartburn medication, Zantac, produces a clinically proven carcinogen in the body at levels far beyond what regulators consider safe. According to Beth Fegan, founder and managing member of consumer-rights law firm FeganScott, Zantac and its generic active ingredient, ranitidine, became one of the world’s best-selling drugs through a massive advertising campaign that touted the drug as safe.

  • Moody's

    Novartis Securities Investment Ltd -- Moody's affirms Novartis' A1 rating; stable outlook

    Moody's Investors Service has today affirmed the A1 long-term ratings of Swiss multinational pharmaceutical maker Novartis AG (Novartis) and its guaranteed subsidiaries. The affirmation follows the company's announcement on 24 November of plans to acquire The Medicines Company, which is developing Inclisiran - a potential cholesterol lowering drug, for approximately $9.7 billion. "Acquiring The Medicines Company will strengthen Novartis' cardiovascular franchise, however, it comes at a high price," says Knut Slatten, a Moody's Vice President and lead analyst for Novartis.

  • Benzinga

    14 Most Shorted European Stocks

    European stocks have severely lagged U.S. stocks over the past year. In that stretch, the iShares MSCI EMU Index (BATS: EZU ) is up just 6%, while the SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust (NYSE: SPY ) is up 50.9%. Eurozone ...

  • Novartis (NVS) to Acquire The Medicines Company for $9.7B
    Zacks

    Novartis (NVS) to Acquire The Medicines Company for $9.7B

    Novartis (NVS) set to acquire The Medicines Company and add a promising candidate to its cardiovascular pipeline.

  • Barrons.com

    Pfizer Has 5 Drugs in Its Pipeline That Could Turn Its Stock Around

    While much of the focus has been on the breast cancer drug Ibrance, there are other new drugs worth watching.

  • Moody's

    AI Sirona (Luxembourg) Acquisition S.a.r.l. -- Moody's affirms Zentiva's B3 CFR; outlook stable

    Moody's Investors Service, ("Moody's") has today affirmed the B3 corporate family rating (CFR), the B3-PD Probability of Default Rating (PDR) and the B2 instrument rating of the senior secured first lien term loan of Al Sirona (Luxembourg) Acquisition S.a.r.l. Concurrently, Moody's has affirmed the Caa2 rating of the senior secured second lien term loan. The rating action follows the announcement that Zentiva has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire the Central and Eastern European (CEE) business of Alvogen Pharma US, Inc. ("Alvogen"; B2 stable).

  • Exclusive: Sanofi's strategy boss to leave as CEO readies revamp
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Sanofi's strategy boss to leave as CEO readies revamp

    Sanofi's most senior strategy boss is set to leave by the end of the month, according to a memo seen by Reuters, in the first major management change under new chief executive Paul Hudson as he shakes up the firm's priorities. Muzammil Mansuri, head of strategy and business development and member of the French drugmaker's executive committee, will be retiring from the company, according to the note from Hudson sent to staff on Wednesday. A spokesman for Sanofi confirmed the decision.

  • Sanofi Is Said to Mull Options for $30 Billion Consumer Arm
    Bloomberg

    Sanofi Is Said to Mull Options for $30 Billion Consumer Arm

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Sanofi is holding discussions over options for its consumer-health business that could be worth $30 billion as new Chief Executive Officer Paul Hudson seeks to rejuvenate the French drugmaker, people familiar with the matter said.While the pharma giant has made no decisions, it has been talking to financial advisers to gauge shareholder feedback, according to the people, who asked not to be identified because the deliberations are private. Hudson, who has said he will take a critical look at all of Sanofi’s operations, will give a strategy update on Dec. 10.Sanofi shares rose as much as 2.9% in Paris, reversing an earlier decline, for their biggest intraday gain in four months.A review of the business that owns Allegra allergy tablets, Rolaids antacids and Dulcolax laxatives could lead to deals including a spinoff or merger -- an approach several rivals have already pursued with their consumer-health units. Such a move could help Sanofi focus on fast-growing areas such as cancer and gene therapy.Sanofi could also decide to hang onto the unit, the people said. That would help the company deal with another potential challenge -- global pressure on drug prices -- by keeping its revenue stream more diversified.Rivals’ ExitsAll businesses are undergoing thorough reviews at the moment, according to the Paris-based company. The consumer-health unit generated more than $5 billion in revenue last year. It competes with a similar division at Bayer AG, which doubled down in the field when it bought Merck & Co.’s over-the-counter operations in 2014, gaining brands such as Claritin.Both Novartis AG and GlaxoSmithKline Plc have recently narrowed their focus on cutting-edge prescription drugs.Led by CEO Emma Walmsley, Glaxo pooled its consumer assets with those of Pfizer Inc., paving the way for a split into two companies, one focused on pharma and vaccines and the other dedicated to over-the-counter brands. Novartis’s Vas Narasimhan spun off the drugmaker’s Alcon eye-care division and ditched a stake in a consumer-health venture as it bets on targeted products like a gene therapy for a rare but devastating muscle disease.‘Trapped Value’Hudson, a former executive at Novartis and AstraZeneca Plc, is also grappling with questions about the future of Sanofi’s diabetes unit, along with its pipeline priorities and acquisition plans. He’s weighing the options with new head of research (and former Roche Holding AG executive) John Reed as well as Chief Financial Officer Jean-Baptiste Chasseloup de Chatillon, who held the same job at PSA Group, the French manufacturer of Peugeot cars, before joining Sanofi last year.Hudson has said he plans to shed light on his strategy at next month’s event outside Boston.A spinoff of the consumer-health unit could unlock as much as 8 euros per share of “trapped value,” Morgan Stanley analysts including Mark Purcell wrote in a September report. Hudson and his team can draw inspiration from strategic transformations at Novartis and AstraZeneca, as well as efforts to spur innovation at Roche and control costs at Peugeot, they wrote.Sanofi shares have climbed about 10% since Hudson was named CEO in June, closing at 82.88 euros on Wednesday. The stock had fallen about 16% over the previous four years.A consumer business spinoff would send a positive signal about Sanofi’s ability to generate a new crop of prescription drugs, said Daniel Mahony, a health-care fund manager with Polar Capital LLP in London.“That would show confidence,” Mahony said in a telephone interview. A stand-alone over-the-counter business might also be attractive, he said. “When you let it loose, it can invest in itself.”In prescription treatments, the company could look to accelerate some of its best prospects, while ditching less promising ones -- a process already underway. Sanofi is advancing into the lucrative field of cancer and seeking novel products to reduce its reliance on Dupixent, a standout medicine for severe eczema and asthma.Hudson and his team are reviewing disease areas “with an eye toward a deeper and much more precise look into our pipeline, into competition and into disruptive science,” the CEO told investors in October. “Fundamental to this will be bolstering our R&D engine.”(Updates with shares in third paragraph.)\--With assistance from John Lauerman.To contact the reporters on this story: James Paton in London at jpaton4@bloomberg.net;Manuel Baigorri in Hong Kong at mbaigorri@bloomberg.net;Dinesh Nair in London at dnair5@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fion Li at fli59@bloomberg.net, Eric Pfanner, Marthe FourcadeFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • PR Newswire

    Pivotal data from Phase 3 study of sutimlimab in cold agglutinin disease to be presented at ASH 2019 late-breaking session

    - CAD is a severe and chronic rare blood disorder in which the immune system mistakenly attacks a person's own healthy red blood cells. There are currently no approved treatments. CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 21, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Full data from the pivotal Phase 3 CARDINAL trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of sutimlimab in people with primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD) with a history of recent transfusions will be presented as part of the Late-Breaking Abstracts Session at the upcoming 61st Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), December 10 at 7:45AM (ET).

  • Amarin's Shares Down on Underperform Rating by Oppenheimer
    Zacks

    Amarin's Shares Down on Underperform Rating by Oppenheimer

    Amarin's (AMRN) shares decline as the independent advisory firm, Oppenheimer, initiates coverage with an Underperform rating on the back of concerns related to its marketed drug, Vascepa.

  • Sanofi weighing options for consumer healthcare unit: sources
    Reuters

    Sanofi weighing options for consumer healthcare unit: sources

    FRANKFURT/PARIS (Reuters) - Sanofi is considering a joint venture or outright sale among options for its consumer healthcare unit, sources told Reuters, as the French drugmaker prepares to present a new strategic plan next month. An initial public offering (IPO) of the unit, which could be worth around $30 billion according to two sources familiar with the matter, is also on the cards. Recently appointed chief executive Paul Hudson, who took the job on Sept. 1, plans to meet investors for a capital markets day in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Dec. 10.

  • Barrons.com

    An All-or-Nothing Bet on 3 Drugs in Celgene’s Pipeline

    A new security issued as part of the deal with Bristol-Myers Squibb amounts to potentially lucrative lottery ticket.

  • A $5 Billion Cholesterol Bet May Be an Overreach
    Bloomberg

    A $5 Billion Cholesterol Bet May Be an Overreach

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Novartis AG appears ready to put a premium on convenience.Bloomberg News reported early Tuesday that the Swiss pharmaceutical giant is conducting due diligence on Medicines Co., a New Jersey-based biotechnology company with a promising drug called inclisiran that can substantially lower so-called bad cholesterol with just two annual treatments. Its principal rivals, Amgen Inc.'s Repatha, and Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceutical Inc.’s Praluent, require biweekly or monthly injections. Buying Medicines Co. wouldn’t be a megadeal, but it won’t come cheap. The company’s share price had already more than tripled this year as it released promising data, and a 20% boost prompted by deal speculation Tuesday pushed its market value well above $5 billion. If the price gets too high or the unnamed others reportedly also interested in the company start a bidding war, Novartis should be ready to walk away. Despite its promise, inclisiran also has its potential limits, and its sales potential is still highly uncertain. Approval isn’t expected until next year.Inclisiran’s predecessors Repatha and Praluent launched with much fanfare in 2015, and the assumption was that they would take on blockbuster status. Insurers balked at the high price of the drugs and the potentially massive market of patients with high cholesterol who might want it, and threw up barriers to access. As a result, the medicines got off to a slow sales start and continue to struggle. Both companies hoped that large outcomes trials proving that the drugs could prevent events such as heart attacks and strokes would turn things around and boost sales. The benefit wasn’t as significant as some hoped, and major sales acceleration never arrived. After a series of big price cuts, the drugs now cost under $6,000, less than half their list price at launch. The two drugs are expected to combine for around $940 million in sales this year; analysts once expected the two to have surpassed that on their own by now. Inclirisan works in a different way and looks like a more effective drug, able to lower cholesterol at a similar rate without nearly as many jabs of the needle. That’s better for patients, and physicians are likely to prefer it because that could translate to fewer missed doses and potentially better overall results. Patients and physicians don't get to choose on their own, though: Price-conscious health plans, insurers, and pharmacy benefit managers are the real decision-makers.These groups are pretty comfortable limiting the use of more expensive next-generation cholesterol drugs to a relatively small population. That reality and the ever-decreasing price of Praluent and Repatha suggests that inclisiran may have trouble pricing at much of a premium.  The drug’s convenience and impact may finally expand this market to a broader group of Americans, especially if its owner is willing to compromise on cost at launch or an outcomes trial due in a few years reveals a positive surprise. It’s entirely possible, however, that it ends up with just a corner of a market that never gets all that big. Under the stewardship of a big company like Novartis, which has managed to navigate a slow launch and resistant market pretty well for its own heart drug Entresto, inclirisan is likely to deliver at least respectable sales some day. The company should be cautious if the price gets to a point where respectable won’t be nearly enough. To contact the author of this story: Max Nisen at mnisen@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Max Nisen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering biotech, pharma and health care. He previously wrote about management and corporate strategy for Quartz and Business Insider.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Protalix Finalizes Accelerated Approval Pathway for PRX-102
    Zacks

    Protalix Finalizes Accelerated Approval Pathway for PRX-102

    Protalix (PLX) successfully completes the pre-BLA meeting and gets FDA acceptance for using accelerated approval pathway for the BLA submission of Fabry disease candidate, pegunigalsidase alfa.