SPHD - Invesco S&P 500 High Dividend Low Volatility ETF

NYSEArca - NYSEArca Delayed Price. Currency in USD
41.58
+0.06 (+0.14%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
Previous Close41.52
Open41.71
Bid0.00 x 3200
Ask42.00 x 800
Day's Range41.46 - 41.76
52 Week Range36.16 - 43.42
Volume323,319
Avg. Volume737,630
Net Assets3.24B
NAV41.57
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
Yield3.93%
YTD Return10.77%
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.74
Expense Ratio (net)0.30%
Inception Date2012-10-18
  • ETF Trends12 days ago

    Dividend ETFs Can Provide the Aspirin for Trade War Headaches

    In an uncertain market environment where trade wars make the major indexes succumb to wild swings, dividend exchange-traded funds can help provide the aspirin for investor headaches caused by volatility. Other challenges to dividend yields is a more cautious central bank that is deviating from its rate-hiking measures seen in 2018. 2019 is certainly seeing a more cautious Federal Reserve when juxtaposed with the rate-hiking machine it was in 2018.

  • Trade Deal Hit or Miss: Dividend ETFs Are Investor-Friendly
    Zacks14 days ago

    Trade Deal Hit or Miss: Dividend ETFs Are Investor-Friendly

    Dividend ETFs should be widely sought after irrespective of the U.S.-China deal.

  • InvestorPlace17 days ago

    5 Safe ETFs to Ride Out Market Uncertainty

    Amid another flareup in the ongoing U.S./China trade dispute, market uncertainty is creeping higher. Earlier this week, the CBOE VIX Volatility Index, a widely followed gauge of investor uncertainty, spiked higher, prompting some analysts to speculate about a technical breakout.While market turbulence and uncertainty may reside on the higher end of the spectrum over the near-term, taking advantage of that theme via volatility-related exchange-traded funds (ETFs) is not something every investor indulges in. Volatility-related products are not safe ETFs. Rather, those products are intended for aggressive, sophisticated traders. * 10 Great Stocks to Buy on Dips Investors do not need to fret. There are plenty of funds that qualify as safe ETFs that help investors stay engage with equities while the U.S. and China workout their trade differences. Here are some ETFs to consider that could prove useful (and durable) over the near-term.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips Invesco S&P 500 High Dividend Low Volatility ETF (SPHD)Expense Ratio: 0.30% per year, or $30 annually per $10,000 investedFor investors looking for a safe ETF that also includes a steady income stream, the Invesco S&P 500 High Dividend Low Volatility ETF (NYSEARCA:SPHD) is an idea to consider. The $3.21 billion SPHD currently yields 4%, or more than double the dividend yield on the S&P 500. SPHD's 50 holdings are the S&P 500 members with the highest dividend yields and the lowest trailing 12-month volatility, making the fund suitable for investors looking to skirt market turbulence.Because SPHD identifies stocks by dividend and volatility traits, this safe ETF's sector bets are not surprising. Currently, the Invesco fund devotes almost 38% of its combined weight to the real estate and utility sectors, groups known for above-average yields and below-average volatility.While SPHD is lagging the S&P 500 this year, the fund has held up somewhat better than the broader market since trade tensions sparked increased volatility last week. SPHD resides about 3.70% below its all-time high. For investors looking to make a long-term bet on a safe ETF, SPHD also makes sense because the fund pays a monthly dividend. iShares Edge MSCI Min Vol USA ETF (USMV)Expense Ratio: 0.15%As the largest low volatility ETF, the iShares Edge MSCI Min Vol USA ETF (CBOE:USMV) is bound to draw increased attention when headline risk rises and that has been the case in recent days as USMV is one of the top asset gatherers among U.S.-listed ETFs since the end of April.Minimum volatility "strategies aim to create a holistic portfolio with lower risk than the market," according to BlackRock. "The factor has historically delivered lower downside capture, but lower upside potential as well, making it more appropriate for investors seeking to reduce risk while still maintaining potential for returns similar to the broader market." * 10 Lithium Stocks to Buy Despite the Market's Irrationality USMV is a safe ETF, relatively speaking, but that does not make it a risk-free bet. Only about 44% of the ETF's sector allocations can be considered defensive and many of the fund's marquee holdings are large-cap multi-nationals that could be pinched by an ongoing trade spat with China, related tariffs or a subsequent rally by the U.S. dollar. iShares Core S&P Small-Cap ETF (IJR)Expense Ratio: 0.07%Small-cap stocks are usually more volatile than larger companies, so the current market environment may not appear conducive to embracing small-cap equities and ETFs such as the iShares Core S&P Small-Cap ETF (NYSEARCA:IJR). Upon further examination, IJR may indeed qualify as a safe ETF at the moment.Small caps typically generate the bulk of their revenue within the U.S., insulating them from trade wars. That is one advantage. Another advantage is that by virtue of that domestic focus, small caps are not pinched by a stronger U.S. dollar as are large-cap, multi-national companies. Amid geopolitical risk, global investors often bid the safe-haven dollar higher. That is often a drag on riskier assets, but a scenario small caps often meet with aplomb.At the sector level, IJR, which tracks the S&P SmallCap 600 Index, cements its domestic focus by allocating approximately half its weight to industrial, financial services and consumer discretionary names. In small-cap territory, those sectors are usually focused on the U.S. economy and do not have export-driven business models. Invesco S&P SmallCap Financials ETF (PSCF)Expense Ratio: 0.29%A small-cap sector fund rarely screams "safe ETF," but considering the lack of international exposure of small-caps and the same being true of the financial services sector, the Invesco S&P SmallCap Financials ETF (NASDAQ:PSCF) could prove to be a safe ETF.Consider this: over the past week, PSCF is down 0.40% while the large-cap S&P 500 is lower by 1.47% over the same period. Additionally, more than 37% of PSCF's 135 holdings are classified as value stocks, more than triple the number of names in the fund that are classified as growth stocks. As a result, PSCF trades at compelling multiples relative to broader small-cap benchmarks, such as the S&P SmallCap 600 and the Russell 2000. * 7 Cloud Stocks to Buy on Overcast Days Over the near-term, PSCF could prove to be a tactical, safe ETF play for slightly aggressive investors. PSCF has recently seen modest outflows, but that situation could rapidly reverse if the fund continues proving sturdy against large-cap plays. ProShares S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats ETF (NOBL)Expense Ratio: 0.35%The ProShares S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats ETF (CBOE:NOBL) is the second dividend fund on this list of safe ETFs and this dividend growth play merits plenty of consideration in this conversation. Recent and long-running history confirm that NOBL and its underlying index, the S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats Index, are usually less volatile than broader equity indexes.Confirming NOBL's status as a safe ETF, the fund has a penchant for performing less poorly than the S&P 500 when the broader market slumps. NOBL did just that last year and its underlying index has even notched a few positive annual performances in years in which the S&P 500 finished lower.NOBL has a dividend yield that is nearly 30 basis points higher than the S&P 500's plus a quality tilt by virtue of its dividend growth emphasis make this a premier safe ETF idea for the current market environment.Todd Shriber owns shares of SPHD. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Dangerous Dividend Stocks to Stay Far Away From * 7 Tips for New Investors Young and Old * 10 Great Stocks to Buy on Dips Compare Brokers The post 5 Safe ETFs to Ride Out Market Uncertainty appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • A Bunch of Dividend ETFs Hitting All-Time Highs
    Zackslast month

    A Bunch of Dividend ETFs Hitting All-Time Highs

    Dividend-focused ETFs are in demand given investors' drive for higher income.

  • 5 of the Best Funds for Downside Protection
    InvestorPlacelast month

    5 of the Best Funds for Downside Protection

    With the S&P 500 up about 15% year-to-date, it would appear safe to say that the bull market is intact. The other side of that discussion is that stocks plunged in the fourth quarter, basically entering a bear market while reminding investors that equities do not move up in a straight line and carrying some downside protection is necessary.While bull markets do not die of old age, there are signs this bull market is aging -- something many investors have acknowledged for some time. With first-quarter earnings season right around the corner, investors may want to consider how companies report earnings as one sign of an aging bull market."S&P 500 companies reported about $1.37 trillion in adjusted earnings for 2018. They reported $1.17 trillion in GAAP earnings last year as well," reports Barron's. "(GAAP is short for 'generally accepted accounting principles.') In other words, the accountants signed off on $1.2 trillion in earnings. Management told investors they earned $1.37 trillion."InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsAdding to the case for the best funds for downside protection are numerous factors, including flareups in the U.S./China spat, the fear of the Federal Reserve potentially reversing course and raising interest rates this year and the specter of markets pricing in concerns regarding 2020 presidential candidates. * 7 Marijuana Companies: Which Pot Stocks Should You Buy? For investors looking for downside protection, these are some of the best funds to consider. Best Funds: Cambria Tail Risk ETF (TAIL)Expense Ratio: 0.59% per year, or $59 on a $10,000 investment.The Cambria Tail Risk ETF (CBOE:TAIL) is not just one of the best funds for portfolio protection, it is also one of the best to own when equities swoon. TAIL's fourth-quarter chart proves as much.The actively managed TAIL "offers the potential advantage of buying more puts when volatility is low and fewer puts when volatility is high," according to Cambria. "While a portion of the fund's assets will be invested in the basket of long put option premiums, the majority of fund assets will be invested in intermediate-term U.S. Treasuries. As the fund is designed to be a hedge against market declines and rising volatility, Cambria expects the fund to produce negative returns in the most years with rising markets or declining volatility."In other words, TAIL is one of the best funds when stocks are sinking, but when stocks are rising, TAIL is vulnerable, as highlighted by the fund's year-to-date loss of almost 13%. Invesco S&P 500 High Dividend Low Volatility ETF (SPHD)Source: Shutterstock Expense ratio: 0.3%Low-volatility exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are often viewed as some of the best funds to consider when the market tumbles. The Invesco S&P 500 High Dividend Low Volatility ETF (NYSEARCA:SPHD) and rival "low vol" funds typically do not capture all of a bull market's upside, but perform less poorly in a bear market.If investors accept and understand that trait, SPHD can be one of the best funds if you're seeking income and downside protection. SPHD, which pays a monthly dividend, has a 12-month distribution rate of 3.9%, about double the dividend yield on the S&P 500. * 7 AI Stocks to Watch with Strong Long-Term Narratives Historically, defensive sectors with high dividend yields trade at premium valuations, but that is not the case with SPHD. The fund devotes over 38% of its combined weight to the defensive real estate and utilities sectors, but more than 76% of its holdings are classified as value stocks. ProShares Short QQQ (PSQ)Expense Ratio: 0.95%As the fourth quarter showed investors, when technology and other growth stocks fall out of favor, markets can rapidly deteriorate. One of the primary benefits of the tech-heavy Nasdaq-100 Index is that it overshoots more traditional broader equity benchmarks on the way up. However, with growth sectors, such as tech, communication services and consumer discretionary, commanding massive percentages of the overall U.S. equity market, declines in those groups usually permeate the entire market.The ProShares Short QQQ (NYSEARCA:PSQ) is ideal for buffering against tech declines. Importantly, PSQ is one of the best funds for traders new to inverse ETFs, because this product is not leveraged. Rather, PSQ is designed to deliver the daily inverse performance of the Nasdaq-100. So if that index falls 1% on a particular day, PSQ should rise 1%.Still, PSQ should be treated as a short-term instrument."Due to the compounding of daily returns, ProShares' returns over periods other than one day will likely differ in amount and possibly direction from the target return for the same period," according to ProShares. AGFiQ US Market Neutral Anti-Beta Fund (BTAL)Expense ratio: 0.76%Like the aforementioned TAIL, the AGFiQ US Market Neutral Anti-Beta Fund (NYSEARCA:BTAL) is one of the best funds when stocks are declining. Buying this fund in advance of those declines can be risky because if stocks continue trending higher, BTAL likely generates negative returns."BTAL's objective is to seek performance results that correspond to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the Dow Jones U.S. Thematic Market Neutral Anti-Beta Index," according to the fund's issuer. "BTAL strives to achieve this objective, by investing long in U.S. equities that have below average betas and shorting those securities that have above average betas, within sectors." * 10 Dow Jones Stocks Holding the Blue Chip Index Back BTAL is down 5% year-to-date, far better than the 13% loss sported by TAIL. In either case, investors are reminded these are among the best funds to own when equities are faltering. During lengthy moves to the upside, these products will lag. Global X | JPMorgan U.S. Sector Rotator Index ETF (SCTO)Expense Ratio: 0.83%The Global X | JPMorgan U.S. Sector Rotator Index ETF (NYSEARCA:SCTO) is a small, overlooked ETF that employs a momentum-based U.S. sector rotation strategy. Despite its diminutive status, this could be one of the best funds to own when stocks sink because SCTO can move to 100% cash when volatility spikes or stocks decline."SCTO seeks to limit equity volatility to a maximum of 20% by allocating assets to short term treasuries in more unstable markets," according to Global X.This fund may be more appropriate for conservative investors because it does not need markets to fall in order to generate positive returns. That said, SCTO is positioned defensively with over 51% of its combined weight currently allocated to the Consumer Staples Select SPDR (NYSEARCA:XLP) and the SPDR Dow Jones REIT ETF (NYSEARCA:RWR).As of this writing, Todd Shriber owned shares of SPHD. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Internet Stocks to Watch * 7 AI Stocks to Watch with Strong Long-Term Narratives * 10 Dow Jones Stocks Holding the Blue Chip Index Back Compare Brokers The post 5 of the Best Funds for Downside Protection appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Low-Volatility ETFs Trading at a 52-Week High
    Zacks2 months ago

    Low-Volatility ETFs Trading at a 52-Week High

    Global growth worries, declining corporate profits in the United States and lingering U.S.-China trade tensions have given a life to low-volatility ETFs this year.

  • ETF.com2 months ago

    Money Pours Into Multifactor US ETFs

    Four of the five largest multifactor U.S. stock ETFs have seen blockbuster inflows year-to-date.

  • 3 Low Volatility ETFs for Smooth Sailing in 2019
    InvestorPlace3 months ago

    3 Low Volatility ETFs for Smooth Sailing in 2019

    Low volatility ETFs had a few days in the sun last year, particularly in the fourth quarter when the S&P 500 tumbled nearly 15%.The S&P 500 finished 2018 with annualized volatility of 17%, the highest reading over the past six years, according to ETF Replay data. That market turbulence prompted investors to turn to low volatility ETFs for stability and those funds obliged. The two largest U.S.-listed low volatility ETFs outperformed the S&P 500 while sporting average annualized volatility of about 13%.And that's exactly what low volatility ETFs are supposed to do: be less volatile and perform less poorly than standard equity funds when the broader market declines. Those are the expectations investors should have from low volatility ETFs. Investors expecting low volatility to offer significant out-performance when stocks are surging are likely to be disappointed.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * Buy These 5 Stocks to Play the Megatrend of the Century The thing about volatility is that it frequently catches investors off guard. In other words, it is better to be prepared than reactive when volatility spikes. Investors can do just that with these low volatility ETFs.Source: Shutterstock iShares Edge MSCI Min Vol Emerging Markets ETF (EEMV)Expense ratio: 0.25% per year, or $25 on a $10,000 investment.With the MSCI Emerging Markets Index up nearly 8% year-to-date, some investors will likely be tempted -- rightfully so -- to nibble at developing economies. Investors that want to do so in conservative fashion can do so with the iShares Edge MSCI Min Vol Emerging Markets ETF (BATS:EEMV), one of a few emerging markets low volatility ETFs.EEMV is up 5.10% year-to-date, reminding investors that international low volatility ETFs, like their domestic equivalents, can lag when the underlying market is rising. Still, EEMV has plenty of benefits for investors."True to its design, EEMV has historically provided investors with downside risk mitigation. In 2018, EEMV declined 58% less than that of broad EM as measured by the MSCI Emerging Markets Index," according to BlackRock. "If we extend the analysis to a longer period of time, similar performance behaviors hold. Since its first full month of live performance in November of 2011, EEMV has exhibited a downside capture of only 78%, reduced volatility by over 23%, and dampened the maximum drawdown by 22%."EEMV holds over 300 stocks. China and Taiwan combine for almost 40% of the fund's geographic weight.Source: Shutterstock Invesco S&P 500 High Dividend Low Volatility ETF (SPHD)Expense ratio: 0.30% per year, or $30 on a $10,000 investment.The Invesco S&P 500 High Dividend Low Volatility ETF (NYSEARCA:SPHD) is one of the best low volatility ETFs for investors looking for the benefits of reduced volatility and higher income. SPHD tracks an index comprised of the 50 S&P 500 stocks with the lowest trailing 12-month volatility and the highest dividend yields.The required combination of low volatility and high dividend yields can lead to some concentration risk at the sector level. After all, not all of the 11 sectors in the S&P 500 are considered light on volatility or high-yield plays. Not surprisingly, SPHD allocates about 49% of its weight to real estate and utilities names. Those sectors usually fit the bill as high-yield and less volatile than other sectors. * 7 Forever Stocks to Buy for Long-Term Gains For income investors, SPHD definitely makes sense as this low volatility ETF has a 12-month distribution rate of 4.06% -- almost double the S&P 500's dividend yield. SPHD has a five-star Morningstar rating.Source: Shutterstock Fidelity Low Volatility Factor ETF (FDLO)Expense ratio: 0.29% per year, or $29 on a $10,000 investment.Fidelity has an expanding lineup of cost-effective ETFs, including some factor-based strategies. The Fidelity Low Volatility Factor ETF (NYSEARCA:FDLO) is one of those funds.This low volatility ETF tracks the Fidelity U.S. Low Volatility Factor Index, "which is designed to reflect the performance of stocks of large and mid-capitalization U.S. companies with lower volatility than the broader market," according to Fidelity.Last year, FDLO beat the S&P 500 and was less volatile than the benchmark, but the Fidelity fund lagged the two largest low volatility ETFs. This year, FDLO is beating the biggest low volatility ETF. At the sector level, FDLO is unique relative to other low volatility ETFs. Technology is the largest sector weight in FDLO at 19.62% and FDLO allocates less than 7% of its combined weight to the real estate and utilities sectors.Todd Shriber owns shares of SPHD. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Stocks That Every 20-Year-Old Should Buy * 10 Best Dividend Stocks to Buy for the Next 10 Months * 10 Monster Growth Stocks to Buy for 2019 and Beyond Compare Brokers The post 3 Low Volatility ETFs for Smooth Sailing in 2019 appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • ETF Trends6 months ago

    Big Dividends, Small Volatility in This ETF

    Dividend stocks can be less volatile than their non-dividend counterparts. Some exchange traded funds ratchet up that concept by focusing on dividend stocks with favorable volatility characteristics. SPHD “is composed of 50 securities traded on the S&P 500 Index that historically have provided high dividend yields and low volatility,” according to Invesco.

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    Market Realist6 months ago

    Cummins Will Support the New EPA Norms

    On November 13, Cummins (CMI) said that it would support the EPA’s intended new standards on the low nitrogen oxides rule for heavy-duty engines like trucks on highways. The EPA is expected to release the new norms in 2020. The efforts are meant to reduce the nitrogen oxide and particulate matters.

  • Seek Shelter With These 7 REIT and Utilities ETFs
    InvestorPlace6 months ago

    Seek Shelter With These 7 REIT and Utilities ETFs

    After a wild October, one that saw the S&P 500 notch one of its worst October performances ever, equity market volatility remains a concern for investors. Stocks rallied following the midterm elections, but the S&P 500 quickly gave back those gains and is currently saddled with a month-to-date loss, suggesting some of that October volatility is seeping into November.

  • 5 Low Volatility ETFs for Skittish Investors
    InvestorPlace7 months ago

    5 Low Volatility ETFs for Skittish Investors

    Among exchange-traded funds (ETFs), departures have recently been widespread with investors yanking money from a variety of equity and fixed income funds. Low volatility ETFs can help investors stay engaged with stocks during tumultuous times. A perk of low volatility ETFs is that these funds are designed to endure lower drawdowns when stocks decline, but the rub is that they do not capture all the upside delivered in strong trending bull markets.

  • Treasury Yields at New 7-Year High: ETF Strategies to Play
    Zacks8 months ago

    Treasury Yields at New 7-Year High: ETF Strategies to Play

    Inside the rising U.S. treasury yields and ways to play the trend with ETFs.

  • 7 Best ETFs for Investors Nearing Retirement
    InvestorPlace8 months ago

    7 Best ETFs for Investors Nearing Retirement

    As is the case with life in general, investing life moves in cycles. Younger investors enjoy at least two valuable luxuries: time and the ability to take on more risk with retirement funds than their older counterparts. Investors nearing retirement face entirely different circumstances than those youngsters that are new to the workforce.

  • 7 Best Retirement Funds to Hold Forever
    InvestorPlace10 months ago

    7 Best Retirement Funds to Hold Forever

    Investing for retirement usually means investing for the long term. While long-term investing should include individual stocks, low-cost exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and index funds should also be part of the equation.

  • The 10 Best Dividend Funds to Buy Now
    InvestorPlace10 months ago

    The 10 Best Dividend Funds to Buy Now

    The best dividend funds on the market all share one thing in common: They’re not one-size-fits-all.

  • 7 ETFs Where Dividends and Low Volatility Meet
    InvestorPlace11 months ago

    7 ETFs Where Dividends and Low Volatility Meet

    Various historical data points and research confirm that dividend-paying stocks are usually less volatile than their non-dividend counterparts. Additionally, stocks that are less volatile, over the long-term, typically outperform rivals that experience larger drawdowns or have higher standard deviations.

  • Morningstar11 months ago

    How Much of Your ETF's Dividend Income Is Qualified?

    A version of this article was published in the March 2018 issue of Morningstar ETFInvestor. In this article, I'll zero in on an often overlooked source of tax costs and examine the topic of qualified dividend income, or QDI. The Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003 made dividend payments more attractive because it introduced a lower tax rate for qualified dividend payments.