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TAL Education Group (TAL)

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
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4.3600-0.1700 (-3.75%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Chart Events
Neutralpattern detected
Previous Close4.5300
Open4.4200
Bid4.3400 x 1200
Ask4.4000 x 3100
Day's Range4.2500 - 4.5300
52 Week Range3.7600 - 90.9600
Volume18,747,988
Avg. Volume17,114,355
Market Cap2.812B
Beta (5Y Monthly)-0.01
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateMay 09, 2017
1y Target EstN/A
  • InvestorPlace

    3 Chinese Education Stocks to Buy on the New Regulation Rumors

    Chinese education stocks have had an interesting ride throughout 2021. And investors should be keeping an extra careful eye on this sector. Why? For-profit education companies represent a sizable chunk of the Chinese economy. However, due to Beijing’s crackdown on the sector earlier this year, investors are reluctant to take the plunge. In recent months, the Communist Party of China has stepped up restrictions on private education. They also intensified their scrutiny and control over companies

  • Benzinga

    Why TAL Education And New Oriental Education Shares Are Rising

    Shares of Chinese education companies, including TAL Education Group (NYSE: TAL) and New Oriental Education & Tech Grp (NYSE: EDU) are trading higher amid overall Chinese market strength. The sector may also be reacting to Monday reports China plans to issue licenses allowing companies to offer after-school tutoring. Shares of Chinese education stocks are volatile on continued regulatory-driven in the sector. Chinese education stocks have been trading lower in recent months following a policy fr

  • Bloomberg

    China’s Tech Crackdown Is Upending Lives From Beijing to Kentucky

    (Bloomberg) -- For the past five years, Catrina Cowart started most of her days at 5 a.m. with a live-streamed call from China. Through a tutoring app called VIPKid, the freelance writer in Lexington, Kentucky earned $21 an hour teaching English to Chinese kids, more than what she would have made at a local school. But her routine ended this summer after Beijing decreed a large portion of its $100 billion private education sector illegal.Most Read from BloombergAmazon Sued Over Crashes by Driver

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