TIP - iShares TIPS Bond ETF

NYSEArca - NYSEArca Delayed Price. Currency in USD
111.40
+0.04 (+0.04%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

111.44 +0.04 (0.04%)
After hours: 4:19PM EDT

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Previous Close111.36
Open111.31
Bid0.00 x 3100
Ask0.00 x 1300
Day's Range111.25 - 111.44
52 Week Range111.04 - 115.26
Volume674,133
Avg. Volume1,200,312
Net Assets24.73B
NAV112.71
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
Yield2.24%
YTD Return-1.01%
Beta (3y)0.92
Expense Ratio (net)0.20%
Inception Date2003-12-04
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Will Yield Spreads Continue to Decline?
    Market Realist5 hours ago

    Will Yield Spreads Continue to Decline?

    The US bond markets remained under selling pressure as bond yields, especially at the short end of the curve, continued to shoot up, while the long-term yields remained subdued. The US Fed through its May post-meeting statement said that inflation would reach the 2% target soon, which was interpreted as a signal for a faster pace of rate hikes. An inverted yield curve, where short-term (SHY) yields are higher than long-term yields (TLT) is considered a warning sign for future recessions, and thus the yield spread has a place in the leading economic index.

  • Why Gold Prices Could Rebound after Testing New Lows
    Market Realist4 days ago

    Why Gold Prices Could Rebound after Testing New Lows

    While there are some factors that could support gold, such as rising oil prices (USO), the opposing factors seem much stronger. The rise in oil prices is seen as positive for gold since it drives inflation and increases gold’s appeal as an inflation hedge.

  • When Do Global Fund Managers Expect the Next Recession to Come?
    Market Realist5 days ago

    When Do Global Fund Managers Expect the Next Recession to Come?

    As per the latest Bank of America Merrill Lynch (or BofAML) Global Fund Manager survey released on May 15, growth expectations have slipped to the lowest level in the last two years. The report indicated that global fund managers expect a slowdown in global growth with only 1% of the respondents thinking that the global economy would strengthen in the next 12 months. Only 2% of respondents were expecting a recession in 2018, while most of the respondents expect the next recession by the first quarter of 2020.

  • Could the US Dollar Slump Be Short Lived?
    Market Realist7 days ago

    Could the US Dollar Slump Be Short Lived?

    The US dollar depreciated against its major trading-partner currencies after the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on May 10 that US consumer prices grew 0.1% in April after falling 0.1% in March. The core consumer price index, which excludes volatile food and energy prices, rose 0.2%, marking a 2.1% year-over-year increase. The US dollar (UUP) fell after this report, as a slower rate of inflation (TIP) growth could mean a slower pace of rate hikes. In a developed economy, higher interest rates boost the currency. On May 10, the US dollar (USDU) index closed at 92.5. It appreciated by 0. ...

  • Bond Yields Fall after April Inflation Data Release
    Market Realist7 days ago

    Bond Yields Fall after April Inflation Data Release

    US bond market investors were relieved after the US Bureau of Labor Statistics’ April report, published May 10, indicated a lower-than-expected inflation growth rate. The latest inflation (VTIP) report indicated that core inflation increased at a slower pace of 0.1% in April, boosting hopes for a slower pace of rate hikes from the Fed. At its May meeting, the Fed stated that it would continue tightening and inflation (TDTT) would reach 2% in future months. The decline in bond yields after the disappointing jobs and inflation reports could be temporary, as inflation expectations may be fueled by higher crude prices.

  • Why Equity Markets Rose after April’s Inflation Report
    Market Realist7 days ago

    Why Equity Markets Rose after April’s Inflation Report

    US indexes (SPY) are reaching highs as investors ignore possible threats of the US pull-out from the Iran nuclear deal and focus on increasing crude prices. Markets have been driven higher by surging energy company stocks (XLE), which are expected to reap the benefits of higher crude oil prices. On May 10, the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ inflation (TIP) report gave investors another reason to pile on risk, with April inflation growth coming in below expectations, at 0.1%.

  • How April’s Inflation Data Relieved Markets
    Market Realist7 days ago

    How April’s Inflation Data Relieved Markets

    On May 10, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that US consumer prices rose 0.2% in April. In contrast, they fell 0.1% in March. The April growth kept the uptrend in inflation (TIP) growth intact. Over the last 12 months, US inflation has grown 2.5%, a steep increase from the 1.6% growth recorded in June 2017. Core inflation (VTIP), which excludes volatile food and energy prices, rose just 0.1%, the slowest growth since November 2017. Over the last 12 months, core inflation has grown 2.1%, above the 2% target rate set by the Fed.

  • How Iran Nuclear Deal Exit Is Affecting Bond Markets
    Market Realist10 days ago

    How Iran Nuclear Deal Exit Is Affecting Bond Markets

    The initial reaction of the bond (BND) market to President Trump’s decision to pull out of the Iran nuclear deal was a decline in bond yields across the board. The yields, however, failed to stay at these lower levels and quickly bounced back after President Trump’s speech.

  • Are Rising Inflation Expectations a Golden Opportunity for Investors?
    Market Realist13 days ago

    Are Rising Inflation Expectations a Golden Opportunity for Investors?

    The personal consumption expenditure (or PCE) price index climbed 2.0% year-over-year (or YoY) in March 2018, which was the biggest gain since February 2017. Excluding the volatile food and energy components, the core PCE index, the Fed’s preferred measure of inflation, rose by 1.9% YoY. Economists are now expecting PCE to hit 2.0% in May because of favorable base effects.

  • Could there be a 4th Rate Hike in the Cards?
    Market Realist18 days ago

    Could there be a 4th Rate Hike in the Cards?

    The Bureau of Economic Analysis defines PCE (personal consumption expenditure) as the value of goods and services purchased by, or on behalf of, US residents. The Fed prefers this inflation (CPI) measure to assess price levels, as it reflects actual price increases for consumers.

  • Higher Wages and Social Security Payments Boost Income
    Market Realist18 days ago

    Higher Wages and Social Security Payments Boost Income

    Could Personal Income Continue to Rise? The BEA (Bureau of Economic Analysis), which is a part of the US Department of Commerce, releases a monthly report on US consumers’ personal income, disposable personal income, and personal consumption expenditure. The BEA’s April 30 report indicated that the US workforce’s personal income rose 0.3% in March, the same increase seen in February.

  • Which Sector Posted Major Job Gains in April?
    Market Realist18 days ago

    Which Sector Posted Major Job Gains in April?

    The ADP March employment report was published on May 2. The report offered deeper insight into employment trends across different sectors in the US employment market. ADP and Moody’s Analytics prepared the monthly report.

  • 10-Year Yield at 3.0%—What Now for the Housing Market?
    Market Realist21 days ago

    10-Year Yield at 3.0%—What Now for the Housing Market?

    The rise was the result of increased inflation (TIP) expectations nurtured by recent strong US economic data and a hawkish FOMC (Federal Open Market Committee) bent on increasing short-term interest rates. The 3% yield on the 10-year bond is mostly a symbolic level for traders, as it’s been acting as a strong resistance in the last few years. Interest rates have been increasing steadily in the last two and half years, but the impact on the housing market (ITB) has been limited, as rates have been increasing very slowly.

  • Why 1Q18 Real GDP Estimate Raises Chance of 4th Rate Hike
    Market Realist22 days ago

    Why 1Q18 Real GDP Estimate Raises Chance of 4th Rate Hike

    The Bureau of Economic Analysis (or BEA) released its first estimate for 1Q18 real GDP on Friday. This reading was above the consensus estimate for a growth rate of 2% but below the 4Q17 real GDP growth rate of 2.9%. This positive surprise may have somewhat cemented the chances for three more rate hikes in 2018, and the Fed has no reason to back off from additional rate hikes this year.

  • What March Capacity Utilization Data Says about Economy
    Market Realist26 days ago

    What March Capacity Utilization Data Says about Economy

    Are Tax Cuts and Deregulation Boosting Industrial Production? The Federal Reserve publishes capacity utilization data along with industrial production data for US industries every month. Capacity utilization change is one of the few economic indicators that acts as a leading indicator for the economy and helps in predicting changes to the US business cycle.

  • Why Interest Rate Spreads Are Decreasing Again
    Market Realist27 days ago

    Why Interest Rate Spreads Are Decreasing Again

    What Do March Leading Indicators Signal for the US Economy? The US bond markets were back in focus as the chatter about the yield curve flattening has grown louder in recent weeks. The decision of the US FOMC during its March meeting to increase the Fed funds rate by 0.25% had an uneven impact on the yield curve.

  • Should We Start Ignoring the Yield Curve Inversion?
    Market Realistlast month

    Should We Start Ignoring the Yield Curve Inversion?

    Based on comments from key members of the FOMC (Federal Open Market Committee) and the mismatch between the economic performance and signals of a flattening yield curve, it’s tempting to stop depending on the slope of the yield curve (BND) (AGG) as a tool to determine recession risk. It’s important to understand that no financial indicator is foolproof, and the same can be said about the flattening yield curve in the current economic climate. As Fed Chair Jerome Powell said, the indicator might not have relevance in a low-inflation (TIP) environment.

  • This Fed Member Predicts Yield Curve Inversion by the End of 2018
    Market Realistlast month

    This Fed Member Predicts Yield Curve Inversion by the End of 2018

    In a presentation given by James Bullard, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, he said the yield curve could invert by the end of 2018. Although the presentation was four months ago, it still holds true since the yield curve has flattened more than what it was in December 2017. In his presentation, Bullard laid out a few conditions that could lead to the yield curve inversion.

  • Why Rising Inflation Failed to Raise Long-Term Yields
    Market Realistlast month

    Why Rising Inflation Failed to Raise Long-Term Yields

    The primary reason cited by the FOMC (Federal Open Market Committee) for holding off on interest rate hikes since 2016 was lagging inflation growth. Whenever the Fed signaled rate hikes, the yield curve flattened since investors were not convinced that inflation (TIP) growth would pick up the pace, which would limit the Fed’s ability to raise rates. The Fed has set a target of 2% inflation (VTIP) growth, at which point the economy is expected to be running at a normal pace.

  • What Makes the Yield Curve Turn Flat or Invert?
    Market Realistlast month

    What Makes the Yield Curve Turn Flat or Invert?

    It’s difficult to pinpoint a single reason for changes to the yield curve’s slope. First, any changes to the Fed’s interest rate immediately impact the yield curve at the short end, and the projections for long-term rates dictate the changes at the long end of the curve. For instance, the recent rate hike at the Fed’s March meeting had varying impacts on the US Treasury yield curve.

  • IMF Warns of Inflation Surprise: Could It Be Good for Gold?
    Market Realistlast month

    IMF Warns of Inflation Surprise: Could It Be Good for Gold?

    The International Monetary Fund (or IMF) also warned on April 18, 2018, that the unexpected rise in US inflation could cause significant global tensions, which could force central banks to respond firmly. It added that a hike in inflation in the US could lead the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates faster than expected. The director of the IMF’s monetary and capital markets department, Tobias Adrian, said, “What we are flagging is that at some point markets see shocks in inflation that raise inflation uncertainty and when that happens, that is associated with a rise in long-term interest rates and that might lead to a tightening in financial conditions.” While he said that the uncertainty regarding US inflation is very low, markets could have an outsized reaction to any spike.

  • CNBClast month

    There’s an ‘interesting phenomenon’ happening with crude, and it could be sending a signal to bonds

    The Fed is sure to hike more than once this year, but the key question is how many times. One market watcher says investors could look in an unusual place for a clue on when the central bike is ready to strike.

  • CNBClast month

    There’s an ‘interesting phenomenon’ happening with crude, and it could be sending a signal to bonds

    The Fed is sure to hike more than once this year, but the key question is how many times. One market watcher says investors could look in an unusual place for a clue on when the central bike is ready to ...

  • Another Indicator Signaling Rising Inflation
    Market Realistlast month

    Another Indicator Signaling Rising Inflation

    The US Bureau of Labor Statistics releases a monthly report that tracks price trends in wholesale markets. Industries from the manufacturing sector (XLI) are surveyed for changes in input prices, and this survey data is used to construct the PPI (Producer Price Index). The survey comprises questions on raw material prices, production levels, and finished goods.

  • US Job Openings Still Near Highs
    Market Realistlast month

    US Job Openings Still Near Highs

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (or BLS) released the “Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey” (or JOLTS) data for February on April 13. The data for this survey is collected by a monthly survey on job openings, the number of new employees hired, the number of employees who have quit, the number of employees asked to leave, and other job separations. The JOLTS report is an indication of the demand for workers in the United States.