TSCDY - Tesco PLC

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
8.70
-0.15 (-1.69%)
At close: 3:49PM EDT
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Previous Close8.85
Open8.80
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range8.70 - 8.84
52 Week Range7.06 - 10.38
Volume187,380
Avg. Volume1,160,682
Market Cap28.795B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.67
PE Ratio (TTM)19.73
EPS (TTM)0.44
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.32 (3.72%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-05-16
1y Target Est8.58
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Moody's7 hours ago

    Tesco Corporate Treasury Services plc -- Moody's upgrades Tesco to Baa3; stable outlook

    Moody's Investors Service has today assigned a new long-term issuer rating of Baa3 to Tesco plc (Tesco), the UK's largest grocer. Concurrently, Moody's has upgraded the senior unsecured ratings of Tesco and its guaranteed subsidiary Tesco Corporate Treasury Services plc to Baa3 from Ba1 and the short-term of Tesco and its guaranteed subsidiary Tesco Treasury Services PLC to Prime-3 from Not Prime.

  • TheStreet.comyesterday

    Carrefour Beats Retreat in China, Following Walmart and Tesco

    After a quarter of a century selling groceries in China, Carrefour is beating a retreat. The deal leaves Carrefour with an interest in China without having to do any of the heavy lifting. Carrefour China currently operates 210 hypermarkets and 24 convenience stores, although its €4.1 billion (US$4.7 billion) in sales last year were down 5.9%.

  • Bloombergyesterday

    Billionaire's $6.6 Billion Bid Comes with Strings

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Even the most unloved companies in the least popular industries can attract takeover interest in the end.The tentative 5.8 billion-euro ($6.6 billion) offer for German’s Metro AG shows that investors can see value in the most unlikely places. Part of the allure must be that the food wholesaler’s defense options are so very limited.Metro split into two in 2017, hiving off its consumer electronics business into Ceconomy AG. Since then, the remaining wholesale business has struggled under CEO Olaf Koch: By July last year, 12 months on from the demerger, its shares were down by about 45%.In August, billionaire Daniel Kretinsky and business partner Patrik Tkac acquired a stake from the Haniel family, one of Metro’s three big shareholders. Now the duo are back with an attempt to buy most of the company through their vehicle EP Global Commerce VI GmbH. The Haniels have pledged their remaining stake.The offer is clearly opportunistic. At 16 euros a share, it is just 3% above Friday’s close. That widens to a 35% premium to the price in August. Identifying the undisturbed share price here isn’t easy: Metro has gained on the expectation of a bid, but Koch, too, has been working hard to turn the company around.The CEO will have difficulty fighting this off. Finding alternative bidders will not be easy given the challenges facing the industry. Sales have been declining and private equity firms are likely to be wary. Metro might look superficially tempting to Tesco Plc, which bought U.K. wholesaler Booker last year. But notably absent from the grocer’s investor update last week were any plans to expand Booker internationally.If there’s any prospect of a counter-bid, it would most plausibly come from Asia. Metro is in the process of selling its Chinese arm perhaps for as much as $2 billion. Potential buyers may now see the opportunity to buy the whole group.Koch can really only try to argue that shareholders would miss out on a recovery by selling now. EP Global would bring no industrial synergies to a deal: There is nothing it can do that Metro shouldn’t be able to do by itself. The snag is that Koch has been around for seven years and has had ample chance to try.The attitude of the big shareholders will be critical. The Haniels seem to be losing patience. What Meridian Stiftung, with 14%, and Otto Beisheim foundation, with 7%, think isn’t yet clear.If Kretinsky's offer gets him to about 75% ownership, he could reach a so-called domination agreement, giving him control of the group’s cashflow without having to buy the whole company. If other shareholders consent, he might be able to secure such an accord with a lower stake. They might well do so, as these deals typically involve a guaranteed backstop price for minorities and decent dividends in the meantime.If Metro finds a buyer willing to pay more, Kretinsky would still get out at a profit. Or, if he struggles to get enough support, he could walk away. The offer is provisional. EP Global already had options to buy shares from the Haniels and others that would have taken it above the 30% threshold that would force a mandatory bid under German rules. Instead, it has structured the offer as conditional on reaching an as yet unstated acceptance hurdle. That keeps EP off the hook – hence the shares haven't risen much above the price being dangled.Credit to Kretinsky: He appears to win in every scenario. Koch by contrast, has a fight on his hands.\--With assistance from Andrea Felsted.To contact the author of this story: Chris Hughes at chughes89@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Edward Evans at eevans3@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Hughes is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals. He previously worked for Reuters Breakingviews, as well as the Financial Times and the Independent newspaper.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Bitter Contest for China’s Online Shoppers
    Bloombergyesterday

    The Bitter Contest for China’s Online Shoppers

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Carrefour SA, Europe's largest retailer,  may be the latest Western company to pull back from China. It’s unlikely to be the last.On Monday, the hypermarket operator said it would sell 80% of its China business for 4.8 billion yuan ($699 million) in cash to Suning.com, the Chinese retailer backed by Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. Carrefour will retain a 20% stake. Over the past few years, the French company’s plans to shrink its China footprint has been one of the worst-kept secrets in banking. Though Carrefour sold the business pretty cheaply – with a valuation of 0.2 times 2018 sales, compared with the industry average of 0.84, according to Citigroup Inc. – loosening its ties to the mainland may be a smart move, whatever the price. With sales in the country flagging and losses piling up, the deal comes as China’s macroeconomic picture is also darkening.Yet the key challenge for Carrefour preceded the trade war. In recent years, online-only players such as Alibaba have been piling pressure on brick-and-mortar operations, with Tesco Plc, Best Buy Co. and Marks & Spencer Plc each announcing plans to pull back from the mainland market. Carrefour’s share of the country’s hypermarket segment fell to 4.6% last year from 8.2% in 2009, Citi writes.(1)   That’s a problem in a country with one of the world’s biggest rates of e-commerce penetration. China's online retail sales reached 3.86 trillion yuan in the first five months of this year, accounting for more than one-fifth of the country's total purchases of consumer goods, according to a recent report by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. To make matters worse, foreign brands no longer have the cachet they once enjoyed – at least in low-end consumer goods. In a survey last year, Credit Suisse AG said that Chinese consumers preferred domestic purveyors in categories like food and drinks and home appliances. With the trade war whipping up nationalist fervor, that trend may accelerate: The bank's latest poll of shoppers 18 to 29 years old showed that 41% preferred phones made by Huawei Technologies Co., up from 28%, while interest for Apple Inc.’s products fell to 28% from 40%.For many firms, ceding control to a local partner is probably the best way forward. Carrefour appears to be borrowing a page from the playbook of McDonald’s Corp., which sold 80% of its China business in 2017 to a tie-up between state giant Citic Group Corp. and private equity firm Carlyle Group LP.Or consider Walmart Inc., which sold its e-commerce delivery site to JD.com Inc. in 2016 in exchange for a stake in the Chinese retailer. The U.S. firm now aims to open 40 of its Sam’s Club stores in China by 2020. Costco Wholesale Corp. is also betting on China’s appetite for bulk buying, with plans to open its first bricks-and-mortar store in August. Whether Costco can pull this off without a local partner remains unclear.What is clear is that Carrefour won’t be the last retailer to rethink its China strategy. Germany's Metro AG is also looking to sell its $1.5 billion Chinese business. At a time when Chinese acquisitions overseas have dried up, bankers at least can thank Western firms for managing to drum up some business from the mainland. (1) The bank citesEuromonitor International research.To contact the author of this story: Nisha Gopalan at ngopalan3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nisha Gopalan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and banking. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones as an editor and a reporter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com6 days ago

    How to Win in the Cutthroat Grocery Business, According to Tesco CEO Dave Lewis

    Dave Lewis, one of our World’s Best CEOs of 2019, turned around Britain’s largest grocer. There are lessons here for the rest of the industry.

  • Britain's Tesco says no timetable for 'finest' store launch
    Reuters6 days ago

    Britain's Tesco says no timetable for 'finest' store launch

    Tesco, Britain's biggest retailer, said it is considering a trial of an upmarket convenience store under the 'Tesco finest' banner but has not disclosed when or where a pilot will be launched. Tesco hosted a capital markets day for analysts and investors on Tuesday at which it presented a slide flagging an opportunity for a 'Tesco finest' store concept with a 7% operating margin - significantly ahead of the group-wide target of 3.5% to 4%. The premium 'finest' range of grocery products is Tesco's most expensive.

  • Britain's Tesco targets further margin improvement
    Reuters7 days ago

    Britain's Tesco targets further margin improvement

    Tesco, Britain's biggest retailer, is targeting expansion of its profit margin beyond that of an existing multi-year recovery plan, it said on Tuesday. Celebrating its 100th anniversary, the group is deep into a turnaround programme under Chief Executive Dave Lewis after a 2014 accounting scandal capped a dramatic downturn in its fortunes. At a Capital Markets Day (CMD) presentation to analysts and investors, Tesco also said its priority for allocating capital was reinvesting in the business, maintaining its debt ratios and growing its dividend.

  • Financial Times7 days ago

    How do I doubt thee? Let me count Plus500 ways

    Plus500’s non-executive directors got off lightly at Tuesday’s annual shindig. About 14 per cent of shareholders in the Israel-based group — whose shares are a third of their peak when Plus500 moved to the main market a year ago — voted against the re-election of Penelope Judd as chairman. A fifth voted against the re-election of Stephen Baldwin, nomination committee chair, and 13 per cent voted against the senior independent director, Charles Fairbairn.

  • Financial Times7 days ago

    Tesco considers launching ‘Finest’ stores

    Tesco is considering launching upmarket convenience stores that would compete with brands such as Marks and Spencer’s Simply Food, as it attempts to build on a recent recovery in sales growth and profit margins. It showed an illustration of a branded store selling its premium product range that also included a café. Tesco suggested such stores could generate an estimated operating profit margin of 7 per cent — twice the level the company as a whole is making.

  • Financial Times9 days ago

    Women fight for equal pay at supermarkets

    Isobel Lodwick’s great grandmother was a suffragette who chained herself to Glasgow’s Govan Town Hall in protest that only men could vote. Decades later, Ms Lodwick is also fighting for women’s rights as one of 5,000 claimants bringing an equal pay case against Tesco, the UK’s largest retailer. If Asda, Tesco, Wm Morrison, J Sainsbury and the Co-op lose it is estimated that the total compensation bill could top £8bn and prompt people in other sectors to take similar action.

  • If You Like EPS Growth Then Check Out Tesco (LON:TSCO) Before It's Too Late
    Simply Wall St.11 days ago

    If You Like EPS Growth Then Check Out Tesco (LON:TSCO) Before It's Too Late

    Like a puppy chasing its tail, some new investors often chase 'the next big thing', even if that means buying 'story...

  • Tesco has no plans to exit central Europe: chairman
    Reuters12 days ago

    Tesco has no plans to exit central Europe: chairman

    British retailer Tesco has no plans to exit its central European operations, Chairman John Allan said on Thursday. At Tesco's annual shareholder meeting an investor asked if the group would still own central European operations by December 2020. "I've been taught never say never because things may change but at the moment we have no plans that the board has discussed or approved to exit central Europe," he said at the meeting held at Tesco's headquarters in Welwyn, north of London, which was webcast.

  • Amazon's Assault on Britain Has Gone Up a Notch
    Bloomberg12 days ago

    Amazon's Assault on Britain Has Gone Up a Notch

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The changing nature of food retailing was laid bare on Thursday with lower-than-expected U.K. sales growth at Tesco Plc and Amazon.com Inc. expanding its partnership with the smaller British chain Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc.Amazon’s agreement with Morrisons, while still fairly small right now, shows the ambitions of the online giant toward the U.K., already one of the world’s most competitive retail sectors. That will strike fear into the hearts of supermarket behemoths such as Tesco, Britain’s grocery leader. Tesco has been trying to bolster its defenses, and a slowdown in growth in the three months to May 25 shouldn’t be too surprising. All retailers face extremely difficult comparisons with the same period last year, when Britain was basking in sunny weather and enjoying a royal wedding. The company’s CEO, Dave Lewis, remains on course to hit his target for an operating margin of 3.5% to 4% by February next year.Still, the first-quarter slowdown doesn’t exactly inspire confidence about what happens once that margin target is reached. The company updates the City next week on how it can find ways to bolster sales and profit. It’s staying tight-lipped for now, but making more of its use of customer data — including through its Clubcard loyalty scheme — might be on the agenda. Lewis has talked before about developing the property around its stores. That could become a bigger part of cash flow, too.Tesco could also work more closely with Booker Group Ltd., a recently acquired food wholesaler. It’s experimenting already with putting cash-and-carry outlets in Tesco stores and introducing dedicated bulk-buy areas, with one eye on becoming Britain’s answer to America’s Costco Wholesale Corp. Wisely, it has also set up a purchasing alliance with Carrefour SA, the French supermarket chain.But as the quarter showed, life isn’t getting any easier for Tesco. Aldi and Lidl, the cutthroat German discount grocers, are still powering ahead in Britain, putting enormous pressure on the traditional giants.That makes Amazon’s advances all the more fraught. Morrisons, the U.K.’s fourth-biggest supermarket group, said on Thursday that it was expanding its super-fast grocery delivery service for Amazon customers. Nine regions in England and Scotland will now offer this, up from four. The aim is for nationwide coverage.The rapid roll-out of the Amazon partnership has been facilitated by another smart move by Morrisons chief executive David Potts, who started his supermarket career on the shop floor. He has negotiated an end to his company’s exclusive relationship with Ocado Group Plc, the specialist online grocer. That has opened the door to closer ties with Amazon.Beset by price-slashing German rivals on one side and savvy online operators on the other, Tesco and its ilk are going to have to work hard to keep food in their investors’ mouths.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesco CEO not ready to check out in tough UK retail climate
    Reuters12 days ago

    Tesco CEO not ready to check out in tough UK retail climate

    The boss of Tesco said he had unfinished business at Britain's biggest retailer after its quarterly sales growth slowed in a subdued grocery market under a cloud from poor early summer weather. Celebrating its 100th anniversary, Tesco is deep into a recovery plan under Chief Executive Dave Lewis after a 2014 accounting scandal capped a dramatic downturn in its fortunes. "I'm aware of all the chatter," he told reporters after Tesco published a first quarter trading update before its annual shareholders' meeting.

  • Financial Times12 days ago

    Tesco sales growth slows in ‘subdued’ UK market

    Tesco suffered a sharp slowdown in sales growth in its core UK business in the first quarter after a boost from the warm weather and royal wedding a year ago. Analysts had forecast a 0.8 per cent rise, according to Reuters. The grocer, which is nearing the end of a four-year turnround programme under chief executive Dave Lewis, said it had outperformed a “subdued” grocery market.

  • Update: Tesco (LON:TSCO) Stock Gained 34% In The Last Three Years
    Simply Wall St.25 days ago

    Update: Tesco (LON:TSCO) Stock Gained 34% In The Last Three Years

    By buying an index fund, you can roughly match the market return with ease. But if you buy good businesses at...

  • Reuters27 days ago

    Britain's 'Big Four' grocers lose market share - Kantar

    Britain's "Big Four" supermarkets all lost market share in the 12 weeks to May 19, market research company Kantar said, as like-for-like sales flatlined at leader Tesco and fell at Sainsbury's, Asda and Morrisons. Tesco's share fell to 27.3% from 27.7% a year ago, while Sainsbury's and Asda had equal shares of 15.2%, after sales fell by 1.7% and 0.2% respectively, Kantar said.

  • Reuters27 days ago

    Britain's 'Big Four' grocers lose market share-Kantar

    Britain's "Big Four" supermarkets all lost market share in the 12 weeks to May 19, market research company Kantar said, as like-for-like sales flatlined at leader Tesco and fell at Sainsbury's, Asda and Morrisons. Tesco's share fell to 27.3% from 27.7% a year ago, while Sainsbury's and Asda had equal shares of 15.2%, after sales fell by 1.7% and 0.2% respectively, Kantar said.

  • Reuterslast month

    UK's Tesco to sell $4.7 billion mortgage book as competition bites

    Britain's biggest retailer Tesco will stop mortgage lending at its banking business because of tough market conditions, it said on Tuesday, as rival lender Nationwide Building Society reported a drop in profit margins. Tesco Bank, which serves more than 23,000 mortgage customers with total balances of 3.7 billion pounds ($4.7 billion), said it would stop new lending and seek to sell its existing portfolio of home loans. "In recent years, challenging market conditions have limited profitable growth opportunities," said Tesco Bank Chief Executive Gerry Mallon.

  • Bestinfond's Top 5 Buys of the 1st Quarter
    GuruFocus.comlast month

    Bestinfond's Top 5 Buys of the 1st Quarter

    Spanish fund formerly run by Paramés seeks investments in the US and UK

  • Do Tesco PLC’s (LON:TSCO) Returns On Capital Employed Make The Cut?
    Simply Wall St.last month

    Do Tesco PLC’s (LON:TSCO) Returns On Capital Employed Make The Cut?

    Today we are going to look at Tesco PLC (LON:TSCO) to see whether it might be an attractive investment prospect. To be...

  • Barrons.com2 months ago

    Resurgent Tesco Stock Could Have More Good News Ahead

    After stumbling badly amid an accounting scandal, a horse-meat disaster, and a bungled foreign expansion, the British grocer has successfully returned to its local roots. The company’s coming investor day should offer more good news.