TSN - Tyson Foods, Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
80.97
-1.45 (-1.76%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close82.42
Open81.66
Bid80.90 x 900
Ask0.00 x 800
Day's Range80.79 - 82.05
52 Week Range49.77 - 94.07
Volume1,802,040
Avg. Volume2,590,398
Market Cap29.91B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.43
PE Ratio (TTM)13.55
EPS (TTM)5.97
Earnings DateNov 12, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield1.50 (1.82%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-11-26
1y Target Est94.67
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Beyond Meat breakfast sandwiches steamroll into 9,000 Dunkin' stores
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    Beyond Meat breakfast sandwiches steamroll into 9,000 Dunkin' stores

    Beyond Meat strengthens its relationship with Dunkin'.

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  • MarketWatch

    Beyond Meat stock slides after CFRA initiates at sell with competition rising

    Beyond Meat Inc. stock fell 5.2% in Friday trading after the plant-based meat company was initiated at sell at CFRA with a $120 12-month target. Analyst Arun Sundaram expects Beyond Meat to face increased competition from large food companies. Tyson Foods Inc. and Kellogg Co. are among the businesses that have entered the space with their own plant-based alternatives. "We think larger packaged food companies will end up as the category leaders in the space given their vast global footprint and embedded relationships throughout the supply chain," CFRA said. Beyond Meat stock has tumbled 34.6% over the last three months while the S&P 500 index is up 19.4% for the period.

  • Tyson Bans Pig-Fattening Drug in Bid to Target China Demand
    Bloomberg

    Tyson Bans Pig-Fattening Drug in Bid to Target China Demand

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. meat companies are changing how they source pigs in a bid to target Chinese demand, after an African swine fever outbreak decimated the Asian nation’s hog herd and caused an acute pork shortage.A unit of Arkansas-based Tyson Foods Inc. became the latest supplier to say it will prohibit ractopamine in hogs it buys from farmers, as it seeks to eliminate the feed additive banned by China from its supply chain. The move positions the companies to step up exports to fill the shortfall, as China negotiates to end an 18-month trade war with the U.S.“This paves the way for rapid and increasing shipments to China,” said Dennis Smith, a senior livestock analyst and broker with Archer Financial Services. With the ASF disease decimating hog herds across Asia, Vietnam and South Korea are also likely to need more pork, while North Korea is also reportedly having hog problems, he said.Swine fever is spreading across Asia, infecting millions of pigs and causing unprecedented losses. Hardest hit is China, home to half of the world’s hogs, where prices of pork have soared. The nation’s companies have bought U.S. agricultural products including 20 million tons of soybeans and 700,000 tons of pork so far this year and will accelerate its purchases, Foreign Ministry Spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters on Tuesday.China suspended meat imports from Canada earlier this year after detecting ractopamine in a shipment from a Quebec-based processor. While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the feed additive’s use in 1999, the Asian nation has banned it since 2002, arguing the drug can harm people who consume meat raised with it.Earlier this month, Brazilian meat company JBS SA said its U.S. operations would eliminate ractopamine -- which is banned by several other nations as well -- from its pork supply chain to maximize export opportunities. Smithfield Foods Inc., owned by China’s WH Group Ltd., also doesn’t use the drug.“They can sell to China, or sell to the countries the EU and other suppliers used to sell to,” said Alan Brugler, president of Brugler Marketing & Management LLC. There are “way more” nations that ban ractopamine than those that allow it, he said, adding that maintaining a split supply chain where only some meat is free of ractopamine adds to costs.Tyson has told suppliers feed samples will be taken from farms and sent to a lab to test for ractopamine, a spokesman for the company confirmed. Testing of pigs will happen at the company’s plants.If all U.S. suppliers were to prohibit ractopamine, that would reduce American pork production by 110 million pounds a year because pigs would be leaner, according to Dan Basse, president of AgResource Co.Tyson said farmers were notified of the change Wednesday and have until Feb. 4 to meet the new requirement. The company has been offering limited ractopamine-free pork to export customers by working with farmers who raise hogs without it, and by segregating the animals and products at processing plants. These programs no longer adequately meet growing global demand, Tyson said. Its prohibition will begin February 2020.“This is a reaction to JBS doing the same thing, so they can open up their export opportunities to China,” said Michael McDougall, a broker at Paragon Global Markets in New York. It’s going to take China “a long time to recover, allowing countries like the U.S., Brazil and the EU to export.”Shares of Tyson were down 0.6% at 2:53 p.m. in New York. They have risen 31% over the past 12 months. JBS’s stock, which has soared 209% over the past year, was 0.9% lower in Brazil.(Updates with Tyson testing of feed samples in eighth paragraph, shares in last.)\--With assistance from James Attwood.To contact the reporters on this story: Isis Almeida in Chicago at ialmeida3@bloomberg.net;Michael Hirtzer in Chicago at mhirtzer@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tina Davis at tinadavis@bloomberg.net, Pratish Narayanan, Joe RyanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Tyson Foods bans growth drug from U.S. hog supply as meat firms chase China demand

    Tyson Foods Inc in February will stop buying U.S. hogs raised with a growth drug banned by China, the company said on Thursday, as global meat suppliers seek an edge in boosting sales to Chinese buyers facing a huge pork shortage due to an outbreak of a fatal pig disease. The halt in the use of the drug, ractopamine, reflects a change in strategy for Tyson, company watchers say. The company previously sought to profit by filling holes in U.S. supplies that were left when industry rivals like Smithfield Foods and JBS USA sent American pork to China.

  • MarketWatch

    Tyson Foods to ban use of ractopamine in hogs it buys, to help boost pork exports

    Tyson Foods Inc. announced Thursday plans to prohibit use of ractopamine in the hogs it buys from farmers starting in February 2020, in an effort to boost exports to countries that prohibit the feed ingredient. Ractopamine, a feed ingredient that helps increase the amount of lean meat in hogs, is deemed safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but some countries, such as China, ban the import of pork from hogs fed with ractopamine. "We believe the move to prohibit ractopamine use will allow Tyson Fresh Meats and the farmers who supply us to compete more effectively for export opportunities in even more countries," said Tyson Fresh Meats President Steve Stouffer. Tyson, which generates nearly $1 billion in pork export sales a year, said it notified farmers on Wednesday of the new requirement. Tyson's stock, which was still inactive in premarket trading, has rallied 53.3% year to date, while the S&P 500 has climbed 19.3%.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Tyson to Help Meet Growing Demand for U.S. Pork by Prohibiting Ractopamine Use

    In an effort to meet growing global demand for U.S. pork, Tyson Fresh Meats, the beef and pork subsidiary of Tyson Foods, Inc. (TSN), today announced plans to prohibit the use of ractopamine in the market hogs it buys from farmers beginning in February 2020. Ractopamine is a feed ingredient that helps increase the amount of lean meat in hogs. Tyson Fresh Meats has been offering a limited amount of ractopamine-free pork to export customers by working with farmers who raise hogs without it, and by segregating the animals and products at processing plants.

  • Why frozen food sales are rocking again in America
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    Why frozen food sales are rocking again in America

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  • Hormel Foods Boasts Strong Brands, Input Costs a Worry
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    Hormel Foods Boasts Strong Brands, Input Costs a Worry

    Hormel Foods' (HRL) Refrigerated Foods category is steadily growing on strong brand portfolio. However, rising input costs as well as weak turkey and grocery categories are concerns.

  • 6 Sectors Seen Leading 3Q Earnings Declines in Warning to Market
    Investopedia

    6 Sectors Seen Leading 3Q Earnings Declines in Warning to Market

    The reporting season for 3Q corporate profits will get underway soon, and stock analysts are painting a gloomy picture, calling for aggregate S&P 500 earnings to be down by more than 4% versus the same period in 2018, based on data compiled by S&P Capital, according to CFRA. This would represent the largest year-over-year (YOY) decline since 2016, one reason that the S&P 500 is down by 0.8% so far in October, for its worst start to a calendar quarter in more than three years. “If I had to tattoo something on my arm, it would be ‘stocks chase earnings,’” Mike Bailey, director of research at FBB Capital Partners, told the The Wall Street Journal about the impact of corporate earnings on equity prices.

  • Bloomberg

    Startup Hitches Ride on ISS to Make Space Meat

    (Bloomberg) -- In the world of artificial meats, you can’t get more alien than growing your beef in space.That’s what the Israeli startup Aleph Farms showed might be possible in an experiment on the International Space Station last week, where it grew small-scale muscle tissue from bovine cells using equipment made by the Russian company 3D Bioprinting Solutions.“We are working on a new method to produce the same meat, but in a way that uses less than half of the greenhouse gasses,” said Didier Toubia, co-founder and chief executive officer of Aleph Farms, noting that the experiment was preliminary and just a proof of concept. “The experiment in space shows that meat can be cultivated in the harshest conditions, meaning anywhere, anytime and for anyone.”Consumers, cutting down on meat intake for dietary reasons or concern for environment, have already been introduced to plant-based burgers, sausage and other meat-like products.Beyond Meat Inc., a company that touts its production process as more humane and sustainable than livestock production, has seen its stock soar since its early May debut price. The market for such plant-based products is expected to reach $27.9 billion by 2025 according to research firm Markets and Markets, and Beyond Meat already competes with Impossible Foods Inc. Kellogg Co., Nestle and Tyson Foods Inc., among others.While partly a publicity stunt, the experiment’s goal was to help the Aleph Farms advance its research into meat production in harsh conditions without depending on natural resources, the company said. The U.S.-based Meal Source Technologies and Finless Food also participated in the experiment. While Aleph Farms’ proof of concept in space was successful, even on Earth it will take at least three years before consumers will be able to buy its steaks or burgers, according to company estimates.“The mission of providing access to high-quality nutrition anytime, anywhere in a sustainable way is an increasing challenge for all humans,” said Jonathan Berger, CEO of The Kitchen accelerator that co-founded Aleph.Aleph Farms, which has raised about $13 million, has investors including Israel’s Strauss Group, Cargill Inc., New Crop Capital, and Vis Vires New Protein.(Updates with names of other companies involved in the experiment)To contact the reporter on this story: Gwen Ackerman in Jerusalem at gackerman@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Riad Hamade at rhamade@bloomberg.net, Giles TurnerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Solid Poultry Products to Aid Sanderson Farms Amid Cost Woes
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    Sanderson Farms' (SAFM) sturdy prices in poultry products and solid export sales bodes well. However, high freight costs and soft demand for big bird boneless meat remain concerns.

  • Are Investors Undervaluing Tyson Foods (TSN) Right Now?
    Zacks

    Are Investors Undervaluing Tyson Foods (TSN) Right Now?

    Here at Zacks, our focus is on the proven Zacks Rank system, which emphasizes earnings estimates and estimate revisions to find great stocks. Nevertheless, we are always paying attention to the latest value, growth, and momentum trends to underscore strong picks.

  • MoneyShow

    Tyson Fishes for Plant-Based Shrimp

    Tyson Foods (TSN) tumbled after the protein producer announced lower earnings targets for Q4 due to near-term challenges, explains Chris Quigley, contributing editor to The Prudent Speculator.

  • Beyond Meat Stock Rebounds After McDonald's Pilot
    Investopedia

    Beyond Meat Stock Rebounds After McDonald's Pilot

    Beyond Meat shares moved sharply higher after McDonald's announced a new pilot program at 28 restaurants evaluating the meatless patty.

  • Tyson Foods (TSN) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Tyson Foods (TSN) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Tyson Foods (TSN) closed at $86.46, marking a +0.57% move from the previous day.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-For U.S. beef exporters, Japan trade deal levels playing field but sales surge unlikely

    TOKYO/CHICAGO, Sept 26 (Reuters) - U.S. beef exporters, unhappy after President Donald Trump pulled out of a multilateral trade pact in 2017, stand to sell more meat in Japan after the two sides cut a deal to slice into tariffs. The deal Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe signed on Wednesday will cut tariffs on U.S. agricultural products, including beef, to around levels granted to countries that signed the multilateral Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) last year.

  • Here’s how Beyond Meat can lose the lead in the plant-based meat category to Tyson
    MarketWatch

    Here’s how Beyond Meat can lose the lead in the plant-based meat category to Tyson

    CFRA analyzes the plant-based meat space and the competition that’s heating up between a number of players.

  • Tyson Foods (TSN) Stock Moves -0.11%: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Tyson Foods (TSN) Stock Moves -0.11%: What You Should Know

    Tyson Foods (TSN) closed at $88.17 in the latest trading session, marking a -0.11% move from the prior day.

  • MarketWatch

    Tyson Foods launches refrigerated snack brand Pact

    Tyson Foods Inc. said Wednesday that it is launching a line of refrigerated protein snacks, Pact, that will be made with fruit and nuts along with ingredients like kombucha, macha and turmeric. Pact Snack Bites will also be a source of fiber, prebiotics and probiotics. Tyson said the line falls into the "functional foods" category, which offer health-and-wellness benefits. Pact Snack Bites will come in four varieties including "Gut Instinct," cranberry and kombucha probiotic snacks, and "Vibe On," made with mint matcha and blueberry. Pact will launch first on Indiegogo, the crowdfunding platform, in order to gather feedback. Tyson Foods stock has soared almost 65% in 2019 while the S&P 500 index is up 19.5% for the period.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Tyson Foods Launches Pact® Brand Refrigerated Snack Bites with Functional Benefits

    Tyson Foods, Inc. (TSN) today launched a new line of functional refrigerated protein snacks under its new brand, Pact®, created to help people harness the natural benefits of food. Developed by the company’s team of nutrition and culinary experts, Pact® Snack Bites are expected to tap into a growing functional food market projected to reach $100 billion in the U.S. by 20251. Functional foods have potential to offer positive effects on health and wellness and can help people fill gaps in nutrition. Pact Snack Bites are literally packed with nutrition.

  • Tyson Foods Gains From Protein Packed Brands, Costs High
    Zacks

    Tyson Foods Gains From Protein Packed Brands, Costs High

    Tyson Foods (TSN) is gaining from consistent growth in the Chicken and Beef units. However, rising input costs stemming from market volatilities are concerns.

  • Reuters

    CORRECTED-U.S. worker, food-safety advocates sound alarm over new hog slaughter rules

    U.S. food safety and the health of plant workers will be at risk from new federal rules that allow meat companies to slaughter hogs as fast as they want and shift the role of government inspectors, food and environmental advocates said on Tuesday. The USDA earlier on Tuesday published a final version of rules that will eliminate limits on how fast companies such as Tyson Foods and WH Group's Smithfield Foods can slaughter pigs - a change long sought by meatpackers.

  • Why this NYC official is demanding more diversity in the C-suite
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