UG.PA - Peugeot S.A.

Paris - Paris Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
23.48
-0.47 (-1.96%)
As of 11:23AM CEST. Market open.
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Previous Close23.95
Open23.44
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range23.35 - 23.85
52 Week Range17.17 - 25.40
Volume525,023
Avg. Volume2,094,442
Market Cap20.98B
Beta (3Y Monthly)N/A
PE Ratio (TTM)6.95
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target EstN/A
  • Reuters

    European automakers tell governments they must help sell electric cars

    Europe's carmakers are telling governments they must help build electric car charging points and provide consumer subsidies to boost sales of battery-powered vehicles and assist the industry in meeting stringent new emissions rules. German carmakers are accelerating plans to launch electric vehicles, under pressure from a European Union mandate to deliver a 37.5% cut in carbon dioxide emissions between 2021 and 2030, on top of a 40% cut in emissions between 2007 and 2021. Industry executives warned at this week's Frankfurt auto show that the EU rules could be disastrous for profits and jobs because mainstream customers were not buying electric vehicles.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 4-Carmakers near CO2 cliff-edge in electrification race

    PARIS/FRANKFURT, Sept 10 (Reuters) - Time is running out for European carmakers, which have waited until the last minute to try to meet ambitious EU emissions targets and face billions in fines if they fail to comply. Manufacturers from PSA Group to Volkswagen are using this week's Frankfurt auto show to reveal the new models and strategies they hope can slash carbon dioxide emissions within months. By next year, CO2 must be cut to 95 grammes per kilometre for 95% of cars from the current 120.5g average - a figure that has risen of late as consumers spurn fuel-efficient diesels and embrace SUVs.

  • Reuters

    REPEAT-Peugeot, Dongfeng agree to restructuring plan for Chinese venture

    Peugeot automaker PSA Group and its Chinese partner Dongfeng Group have hammered out a plan to restructure their joint venture operations, slashing costs in the short term and aiming to boost annual sales to 400,000 vehicles by 2025, PSA said on Thursday. Dongfeng Peugeot Citroen Automobiles (DPCA), the joint venture based in Wuhan, central China, plans to reduce the break-even point to below 180,000 vehicles in 2019 and further reduce to below 150,000 vehicles between 2020 and 2021, according to a post on PSA's social media account in China.

  • Peugeot, Dongfeng agree to restructuring plan for Chinese venture
    Reuters

    Peugeot, Dongfeng agree to restructuring plan for Chinese venture

    Peugeot automaker PSA Group and its Chinese partner Dongfeng Group have hammered out a plan to restructure their joint venture operations, slashing costs in the short term and aiming to boost annual sales to 400,000 vehicles by 2025, PSA said on Thursday. Dongfeng Peugeot Citroen Automobiles (DPCA), the joint venture based in Wuhan, central China, plans to reduce the break-even point to below 180,000 vehicles in 2019 and further reduce to below 150,000 vehicles between 2020 and 2021, according to a post on PSA's social media account in China.

  • Moody's

    Peugeot S.A. -- Moody's withdraws Peugeot S.A.'s short term MTN rating for business reasons

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has decided to withdraw Peugeot S.A.("Peugeot") (P)P-3 Backed Other Short Term rating. The (P)Baa3 Backed Senior Unsecured MTN rating on Peugeot's E5 billion Euro Medium term Note Programme remains unaffected. Please refer to the Moody's Investors Service Policy for Withdrawal of Credit Ratings, available on its website, www.moodys.com.

  • Could Peugeot S.A.'s (EPA:UG) Investor Composition Influence The Stock Price?
    Simply Wall St.

    Could Peugeot S.A.'s (EPA:UG) Investor Composition Influence The Stock Price?

    If you want to know who really controls Peugeot S.A. (EPA:UG), then you'll have to look at the makeup of its share...

  • Did Peugeot's (EPA:UG) Share Price Deserve to Gain 95%?
    Simply Wall St.

    Did Peugeot's (EPA:UG) Share Price Deserve to Gain 95%?

    Stock pickers are generally looking for stocks that will outperform the broader market. And in our experience, buying...

  • Exclusive: PSA, Dongfeng to drop two China auto plants, halve workforce - document
    Reuters

    Exclusive: PSA, Dongfeng to drop two China auto plants, halve workforce - document

    BEIJING/PARIS (Reuters) - Peugeot maker PSA Group and partner Dongfeng Group have agreed to cut thousands of jobs in China and drop two of their four shared assembly plants, according to a document seen by Reuters, in a last-ditch bid to curb mounting losses as the world's largest auto market loses steam. Dongfeng Peugeot Citroen Automobiles (DPCA), the carmakers' joint venture based in Wuhan, central China, will halve its workforce to 4,000 as it closes one plant and sells another under plans agreed last month between PSA boss Carlos Tavares and Dongfeng Chairman Zhu Yanfeng, the document showed.

  • Peugeot Sale Makes Sense for Dongfeng
    Bloomberg

    Peugeot Sale Makes Sense for Dongfeng

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- France SA’s romance with the Chinese car industry could be nearing its end.Dongfeng Motor Corp., a state-owned giant that runs joint ventures with PSA Group, Nissan Motor Co. and Honda Motor Co., is looking at options for its 12.2% stake in PSA including a sale or bond issuance backed by the stock, people familiar with the matter told Bloomberg News on Thursday.On purely financial terms, such a move makes a great deal of sense. Dongfeng bought the shares as part of a 2014 bailout of the maker of Peugeot and Citroen cars, brokered by the French government. That investment has done rather well: PSA has seen the third-best share performance in Bloomberg’s Global Automobile Valuation peer group over the past five years, after Geely Automobile Holdings Ltd. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV. The 800 million euros ($897 million) Dongfeng spent at the time is now worth around 2.2 billion euros. On top of that, the operational ventures that underpinned the shareholding have seen better days. Listed subsidiary Dongfeng Motor Group Co.’s sales of Peugeot- and Citroen-branded cars fell by about half in the first six months from a year earlier and are running at less than a quarter of their level in 2015. In the key crossover SUV market, models like Citroen’s C5 Aircross and Peugeot’s 4008 have simply failed to catch fire against competition from Asian and domestic rivals.Unless there’s a serious pick-up in the second half, Dongfeng’s PSA production lines, dedicated to turning out as many as 600,000 vehicles a year, will be running at little better than 25% utilization – levels at which it should be hard for the business to make money. Losses at Dongfeng’s PSA venture were already running at the equivalent of $251 million in 2018; it would hardly be surprising if they were worse this year.Management in China clearly see little sign that sales are about to pick up. Dongfeng’s dealer network for PSA-branded cars shrank by almost 80% between 2015 and 2018, and now stands at just 666 outlets compared with 1,186 for Renault-Nissan marques. The showrooms that remain suffer low productivity, shifting an average of 400 PSA vehicles each in 2018 compared with 1,431 at Nissan outlets and 761 at Honda-branded locations. (For what it’s worth, Renault does even worse, on just 204 vehicles).There’s a more proximate issue, too. Cash has been looking a little tight for Dongfeng’s listed subsidiary of late, owing largely to a huge increase in working capital, two years of negative Ebit, and net debt of 2.15 billion euros that was running at 8.1 times Ebitda at the end of December. In the 2018 fiscal year, operating cash flows actually turned negative to the tune of about 1.25 billion euros, a relatively rare event for carmakers that aren’t in the grip of a financial crisis or corporate scandal.Dongfeng still has ample liquidity. Its ratio of short-term assets to short-term liabilities was 1.36 at the end of December, above the industry average. But China’s auto market is grim, with sales declining from a year earlier for 12 straight months even as the government ratchets up pressure to spend money on the switch to electric vehicles. Faced with such headwinds, 2.2 billion euros could come in handy.At present there’s no word that Dongfeng is planning to unwind the JV to manufacture PSA cars in China – but it would probably welcome such an outcome, especially if it could persuade its European affiliate to pay to take more control of the partnership in the manner of the deal last year between BMW AG and Brilliance China Automotive Holdings Ltd.Dongfeng’s partnerships with Nissan and Honda are clearly the better performers, and PSA may feel it needs more of a free hand to turn around its Chinese operation. If a sale of a strategic stake can help ease the path toward that happier outcome, both sides stand to benefit.To contact the author of this story: David Fickling at dfickling@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Trump says auto tariffs never off the table in EU trade talks

    President Donald Trump on Friday blasted the European Union for its use of trade barriers and revived his threat to impose U.S. tariffs on European automobiles if he does not see progress in stalled negotiations between the longstanding partners. Trump made the comments shortly after signing a deal to sell more U.S. beef to Europe, an event at which he startled participants by joking that his administration was working "on a 25% tariff on all Mercedes-Benz and BMWs coming into our nation". "The EU has tremendous barriers to us," Trump told reporters later at the White House.

  • Bloomberg

    Boris Johnson Is Playing With Fire on the Pound

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Boris Johnson has been the U.K.’s leader for only a week, but he and his “Brexit war cabinet” have achieved one milestone already: The pound has slumped to its lowest level against the U.S. dollar and the euro since 2017.The cause is Britain’s newfound eagerness to up the ante in its negotiations with the European Union, with Johnson refusing to even meet with EU leaders until they scrap the terms of his predecessor Theresa May’s Brexit deal. His “do-or-die” hardball strategy has been gleefully parroted by ministers such as the foreign secretary Dominic Raab, who say leaving without a deal would be an even better way to squeeze a trade deal out of “stubborn” Brussels and prove the naysayers wrong.In more normal times, the sight of a currency selloff greeting a new Conservative government – led by someone who promised to be the “most pro-business prime minister” in history – might lead to a rethink. But we know Johnson doesn’t worry much about big market moves: “The pound goes up, the pound goes down,” he once said.We also know that some Brexiters see weak sterling as a good thing. The former Brexit Secretary David Davis said back in February that forecasts of a 20% currency fall in the event of no deal were something to cheer: “Our goods will become 20% more competitive on the global market.” Robert Halfon, a Conservative member of Parliament, added this week that “hopefully holidaymakers will choose GB as a holiday destination.”There’s a dangerous and deceptive optimism at work here. Beyond the usual dismissal of any criticism of Brexit as “Project Fear,” there’s clearly a belief among some that threatening no deal is kind of a free hit: It can depreciate the pound, boost British exports and heap pressure on Brussels in one swoop. This is playing with fire.While it’s true that the trade-weighted sterling fall of 15% since the referendum means a theoretical knock-on effect on goods export prices, that might matter less than the Brexiters think. Johnson and Raab need to reflect more carefully on the chief reason investors are dumping the pound: The anticipated negative impact of breaking from the EU (something that gets worse the harder the prospective rupture looks). And this impact almost certainly means a less attractive and more costly environment for exporters, whether that’s via new tariffs, regulatory barriers or lower productivity growth.So rather than merely inciting companies to invest more in the U.K. and export to the world, the currency drop also signals the risks of doing so. That’s why U.K. business investment is lagging the G7, according to Bloomberg Intelligence, while data from EY shows more foreign investment projects are being delayed.Instead of dismissing businesses’ fears of a no-deal Brexit as “unbalanced,” Raab should listen to CEOs such as Carlos Tavares of Peugeot SA. In an FT interview, Tavares said he might have to pull production from the carmaker’s Cheshire plant and shift it to the continent if the post-Brexit economics didn’t work. The site exports most of its output to Europe and imports most of its parts; what Tavares wants isn’t a weaker pound but the visibility on customs charges that a no-deal scenario doesn’t give him. Try telling a carmaker it should cheer a depressed sterling when EU car import tariffs are 10% and a single component can cross the English Channel three times.As Tavares can attest, imports are an equally important part of the trade picture. Yet the more Panglossian Brexiters are ignoring the fact that a weakening currency makes them pricier. And this isn’t just about protecting parts-importing manufacturers. Britain sources half of what it eats from abroad, so it’s a little unwise politically to dismiss the threat.The U.K.’s risk of runaway inflation is pretty low right now, judging by Bank of England data and market forecasts, but we’ve seen bouts of consumer price rises since the referendum. The country’s real household disposable income has shrunk an estimated 0.3 percent on average between 2016 and 2019, according to the Resolution Foundation. Brexit is already making the U.K. worse off. The falling pound won’t help.To contact the author of this story: Lionel Laurent at llaurent2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Lionel Laurent is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Brussels. He previously worked at Reuters and Forbes.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of UG.PA earnings conference call or presentation 24-Jul-19 6:30am GMT

    Half Year 2019 Peugeot SA Earnings Presentation

  • Reuters

    British PM Johnson tells EU: Ready to talk Brexit when you shift position

    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has told EU leaders he will sit down for Brexit talks when they indicate that they are ready to shift position on the divorce deal, otherwise Britain will prepare for leaving without an agreement, his spokeswoman said. "The PM has been setting out to European leaders the position ... that the Withdrawal Agreement with the backstop has not been able to pass parliament on the three occasions it was put in front of parliament. "The prime minister would be happy to sit down when that position changes.

  • French carmaker Peugeot to seek European company legal status
    Reuters

    French carmaker Peugeot to seek European company legal status

    French carmaker Peugeot said it would be looking to take up the formal legal status of being a European company, which it said would better reflect the business and the integration of the Opel/Vauxhall businesses. "This business structure, used by a growing number of companies in Europe, is recognized in all member states of the European Union. It would reflect Groupe PSA's European scope, following the successful integration of Opel/Vauxhall," Peugeot said in a statement.

  • What Do Analysts Think About Peugeot S.A.'s (EPA:UG) Future?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Do Analysts Think About Peugeot S.A.'s (EPA:UG) Future?

    In December 2018, Peugeot S.A. (EPA:UG) announced its earnings update. Overall, analyst forecasts seem fairly subdued...

  • Can Peugeot S.A. (EPA:UG) Maintain Its Strong Returns?
    Simply Wall St.

    Can Peugeot S.A. (EPA:UG) Maintain Its Strong Returns?

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...

  • Why Formula E matters to brands like Porsche, Jaguar and Tag Heuer
    Yahoo Finance

    Why Formula E matters to brands like Porsche, Jaguar and Tag Heuer

    Despite Jean-Éric Vergne back to back world championship, the 2018-2019 Formula E season was especially exciting, resulting in a season that had 8 different winners over the span of 13 races. And while exciting is good for motorsports, that’s not the only reason why big manufacturers and brands spend small fortunes to compete in, and sponsor, motorsports.