UL - The Unilever Group

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
58.79
-0.23 (-0.39%)
At close: 4:02PM EST
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Previous Close59.02
Open58.59
Bid0.00 x 1300
Ask58.83 x 800
Day's Range58.56 - 58.88
52 Week Range50.80 - 64.84
Volume804,199
Avg. Volume779,606
Market Cap154.5B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.40
PE Ratio (TTM)23.26
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield1.81 (3.06%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-10-31
1y Target EstN/A
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    3 Dow Stocks for Dividend Investors to Buy as Stock Market Keeps Climbing

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  • Can We See Significant Institutional Ownership On The The Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) Share Register?
    Simply Wall St.

    Can We See Significant Institutional Ownership On The The Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) Share Register?

    A look at the shareholders of The Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) can tell us which group is most powerful. Large companies...

  • Fires and Floods Make Saudi Aramco IPO a Hard Sell
    Bloomberg

    Fires and Floods Make Saudi Aramco IPO a Hard Sell

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It is a bad time to buy into an oil company whose major asset is reserves in the ground that can sustain current production levels of the carbon-laden fossil fuel until near the end of the century. Oil lost its place in the power generation market after the oil shocks of the 1970s, and it is now starting to see serious competition for powering cars, buses and trucks along with the first signs of viable alternatives for fueling maritime transport. Oil’s domination in air transport looks safer for now, and the industry forecasts the strongest growth in petrochemicals that go into everything from plastics and fertilizers to electronic gadgets and clothing. But the tide of history is moving firmly against fossil fuels.Saudi Aramco may boast that it holds the rights to the largest reserves of crude with the lowest carbon footprint to extract, but that rather misses the point. The climate concerns around oil are not about the carbon cost of getting it out of the ground, but of what is done with it afterward.The oil age may not be over — far from it — but oil is facing unprecedented headwinds. Here’s a sample from recent weeks and months:Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro said last week that climate change is menacing the historic maritime city, which suffered its second-highest tide on record. Parts of northern England are suffering their worst flooding in decades, and millions were displaced as Cyclone Bulbul hit Bangladesh and northern India.Storms and floods are not new, but they are becoming more severe, more frequent and causing more damage as sea levels rise and the climate changes — developments that are linked, at least in part, to the burning of fossil fuels.Unprecedented bushfires are ravaging parts of eastern Australia rendered tinderbox dry by a two-year drought. Wildfires forced hundreds of thousands of Californians to flee their homes earlier this month. Russia is suffering one of its worst years this century for forest fires. Once again, climate change is contributing to the creation of the hot, dry conditions that have allowed the fires to spread.Climate change is also melting Russia’s permafrost. Not a problem for Saudi Aramco, perhaps, but certainly one for Russia’s oil industry, which relies on infrastructure built in the 1970s on ground that is no longer able to support the weight it was 40 years ago.Mounting climate concerns are inexorably turning public opinion against hydrocarbons, including oil.What’s more, pollution caused by leaking pipelines, accidents involving oil tankers, or drilling rigs are all increasing the pressure on the oil and gas industry.  Particulate emissions from burning fossil fuels are behind elevated mortality rates, leading to stricter controls on ship fuels, measures to push cars and vans out of city centers and increasing pressure on airlines to find alternatives.Aramco has a solution to the predicament the industry is in — petrochemicals. The company wants to turn 40% of its crude into chemicals, according to Abdulaziz Al-Judaimi, Saudi Aramco’s senior vice president for downstream. But petrochemicals are under pressure, too.Globally more than 200 businesses, from Coca-Cola Co. to food and consumer goods giant Unilever NV  have made commitments to reduce plastic waste, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. Unilever aims to halve its use of virgin plastic by 2025. Coca-Cola’s goal is for its bottles to contain an average of 50% recycled content by 2030. Initiatives like those will make a serious dent in the projected demand for new plastics.And then there’s an issue that is specific to Saudi Aramco — the security of its facilities. The company did a spectacular job of restoring output levels after a devastating attack on its oil facilities in September, using spare capacity elsewhere to boost flows. But the very fact of the attacks has raised concerns among potential investors about Saudi Arabia’s ability to protect its oil infrastructure.The time to bring private investors into Saudi Aramco was when everybody wanted a piece of the action. Twenty years ago investors would have fallen over each other beating a path to Saudi Aramco’s door. It’s a much tougher sell now.To contact the author of this story: Julian Lee at jlee1627@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Julian Lee is an oil strategist for Bloomberg. Previously he worked as a senior analyst at the Centre for Global Energy Studies.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Lloyds Banking, Unilever, BP, RELX and Vodafone
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    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Lloyds Banking, Unilever, BP, RELX and Vodafone

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    5 Stocks to Profit as U.K. Economy Hits Decade Low in Q3

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  • Barrons.com

    Unilever Stock Edges Up after Chairman’s Sudden Resignation

    (ULVR)’s stock edged up on Wednesday as the consumer goods giant’s chairman abruptly resigned. Marijn Dekkers was behind a failed bid to move the company’s headquarters from London to Rotterdam, which was met by a shareholder revolt. The Anglo-Dutch company had announced a partnership with Burger King to supply a new plant-based Rebel Whopper burger across Europe just a day earlier.

  • Unilever Chairman Leaves $162 Billion Role to Run $85 Million Fund
    Bloomberg

    Unilever Chairman Leaves $162 Billion Role to Run $85 Million Fund

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- And then there were none.Almost exactly a year after Unilever NV announced the departure of chief executive officer Paul Polman, the consumer goods giant’s chairman Marijn Dekkers is stepping down with immediate effect. Nils Andersen, a non-executive director since 2015, will replace him.In one sense it’s a natural time for a change. Dekkers has overseen the CEO succession, with Alan Jope starting last January. Unless something goes horribly wrong, that should be off the agenda for some time. Yet it jars that the chairman is leaving the post immediately after filling it for just three years.Unilever says he wants to concentrate on his responsibilities as founder and chairman of Novalis LifeSciences, an investment and advisory firm for the drugmaking industry. Novalis recently raised $85 million and plans to invest in at least eight companies. The suggestion was that this didn’t leave much time for leading the board of Unilever, whose market value is 147 billion euros ($162 billion).Dekkers, a former CEO of Bayer AG, will stay as a non-executive director. It’s strange nonetheless that Unilever didn’t wait until its annual shareholder meeting in April before standing him down. It’s hard not to link the wholesale change at the top of the Anglo-Dutch company to its botched attempt to simplify into a single Netherlands-based organization.After this unification effort was abandoned last year, the future of Unilever’s dual-headed corporate structure is unresolved. Andersen will need to address this, especially if the company wants to spin off its food business or use its shares to make a big acquisition in the U.S. Having two classes of shares makes this more difficult.That the new chairman is neither British nor Dutch (he’s Danish) is helpful given that the future domicile will probably be on the agenda again. However, hiring an outsider would have been better still for tackling such a profound question; Jope is a Unilever lifer.The new CEO may now find himself confronted by a stronger chairman given that Dekkers was damaged by the unification debacle. Andersen has relevant experience too: He was chief executive of the brewer Carlsberg A/S between 2001 and 2007.Jope has a difficult enough task in accelerating sales growth, which has been stubbornly sluggish despite Unilever’s strong portfolio of brands and enviable emerging market exposure. Making a success of the company’s many acquisitions, from fake meat to premium laundry, is another priority. Integrating these businesses, often created by entrepreneurial founders, into the Unilever culture isn’t easy.Longer term, Jope and Andersen must decide whether to stick with the food business after Unilver sold its spreads arm in 2017, or whether to go all in on the faster growing beauty and personal care brands. If they do decide on radical change, it will need to be better executed than the plan to ditch the British headquartersTo contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times

    Unilever chair Marijn Dekkers to step down after three years

    Unilever has replaced Marijn Dekkers as chairman, ending a tenure marked by controversy over a failed attempt to revamp the Anglo-Dutch company’s structure and move its headquarters to Rotterdam. Nils Anderson, the former chief executive of shipping company AP Moller-Maersk and beer brewer Carlsberg, will take over with immediate effect, the consumer goods group said in a statement. Mr Anderson has been on the Unilever board since 2015, and serves as the chairman of Dutch paint company Akzo Nobel.

  • Unilever Chairman Marijn Dekkers steps down
    MarketWatch

    Unilever Chairman Marijn Dekkers steps down

    Unilever PLC said Wednesday that Chairman Marijn Dekkers is stepping down from the board with immediate effect, and that Nils Andersen will replace him.

  • Unilever appoints Nils Andersen as chairman, replacing Dekkers
    Reuters

    Unilever appoints Nils Andersen as chairman, replacing Dekkers

    Andersen, a non-executive director on Unilever's board since 2015, comes in alongside Scotsman Alan Jope who took over as CEO earlier this year. Jope wants to carve out more market share for Unilever's foods, but faces a challenge in low-growth categories like tea, bouillon, mayo and condiments.

  • Investing.com

    Premarket London: SSE Profit Rises; Wizz Air Soars

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  • Burger King launching plant-based Whopper in Europe
    MarketWatch

    Burger King launching plant-based Whopper in Europe

    Burger King is introducing a plant-based burger in Europe. But it’s not the Impossible Whopper that’s been a hit with U.S. customers.

  • Burger King picks Unilever to make plant-based Whoppers in Europe
    Reuters

    Burger King picks Unilever to make plant-based Whoppers in Europe

    Burger King on Monday rolled out a meat-free version of its Whopper burger in 25 European countries, using patties made by Unilever Plc to strengthen its foothold in the exploding market for plant-based food served in restaurant chains. Heightened concerns about health and the environmental impact of industrial animal farming are pushing plant-based proteins into restaurant menus and chilled meat aisles in stores. Companies from Beyond Meat Inc to Impossible Foods Inc are competing fiercely for deals with fast-food makers, as plant-based mania spreads across Europe and the United States.

  • Bloomberg

    Pakistan’s Shan Foods Considers Sale of Majority Stake

    (Bloomberg) -- Shan Foods Pvt. is considering the sale of a majority stake that could value the Pakistani spice maker at about $250 million, according to people familiar with the matter.The company is working with a financial adviser on the sale and has approached potential buyers including Unilever Plc., said the people said, who asked not to be identified as the discussions are private.A deal would give potential acquirers exposure to the world’s sixth most populous nation that was the fastest retail market globally until an economic crisis recently. The nation is looking to stabilize its economy after securing a $6 billion bailout from the International Monetary Fund.Deliberations are ongoing and Shan Foods can still decide to sell a non-majority stake or keep the business, the people said. Representatives for Shan Foods and Unilever declined to comment.Shan Foods, founded in 1981, is known for its small boxes with spices and recipe mixes that are used in South Asian cooking, according to its website. Its products are available in 65 countries, the website shows.Among measures to revive the economy, Pakistan discourages consumer good imports that makes it a boon for local manufacturers including Unilever’s operations there. Unilever Pakistan Foods Ltd.’s net sales rose 7% to 9.6 billion rupees ($62 million) for the first nine months this year, according to the company’s website.\--With assistance from Thomas Buckley.To contact the reporters on this story: Faseeh Mangi in Karachi at fmangi@bloomberg.net;Vinicy Chan in New York at vchan91@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fion Li at fli59@bloomberg.net, Jonas BergmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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    MarketWatch

    Meat companies are the worst at managing water risk — and it’s costing them, study finds

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  • Coca-Cola, Nestlé and Pepsi top this list of plastic violators, and there’s been a solar breakthrough from Sweden
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  • Tweedy Browne's 3rd-Quarter Buys
    GuruFocus.com

    Tweedy Browne's 3rd-Quarter Buys

    Fund buys Unilever and adds shares in US large caps Continue reading...

  • MarketWatch

    MediPharm names Robert Kwon its new CFO, to succeed Christopher Hobbs

    MediPharm Labs Corp. said Monday it has named Robert Kwon as its new chief financial officer, effective Nov. 18, succeeding Christopher Hobbs. The Canada-based cannabis extraction and purification company said Kwon was most recently senior vice president of Canada-based food and drug retailer George Weston Ltd., and has previously served as CFO, Canada at Unilever. Hobbs will continue to serve on MediPharm's board of directors. MediPharm's U.S.-listed stock has tumbled 14.2% over the pat three months but has nearly tripled (up 181.5%) year to date, while the ETFMG Alternative Harvest ETF has lost 21.4% this year and the S&P 500 has climbed 22.3% year to date.

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  • MrBeast and PewDiePie will ‘freaking do something about climate change’ by planting 20 million trees
    MarketWatch

    MrBeast and PewDiePie will ‘freaking do something about climate change’ by planting 20 million trees

    Evidence of the increasing effects of climate change is building, as are the investing opportunities and changes in consumer habits linked to environmental concerns and resource use. Here are select dispatches about the companies responding to customer demands and climate risk, the ESG investors and their advisers, and the policy-makers, enterprising individuals and scientists preparing for tomorrow. “It’s freaking time to do something about climate change.” That’s the motivating pledge from Jimmy “MrBeast” Donaldson, the social-media personality considered to be YouTube’s favorite stunt philanthropist.