UN - The Unilever Group

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
60.52
+0.88 (+1.48%)
At close: 4:01PM EST
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Previous Close59.64
Open60.47
Bid59.65 x 3000
Ask61.00 x 2900
Day's Range60.20 - 60.65
52 Week Range52.08 - 63.62
Volume1034759
Avg. Volume1,161,530
Market Cap159B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.39
PE Ratio (TTM)23.95
EPS (TTM)2.53
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield1.81 (3.03%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-10-31
1y Target Est70.00
  • Should You Like The Unilever Group’s (AMS:UNA) High Return On Capital Employed?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Like The Unilever Group’s (AMS:UNA) High Return On Capital Employed?

    Today we are going to look at The Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) to see whether it might be an attractive investment...

  • Hedge Funds Are Buying The Unilever Group (UL)
    Insider Monkey

    Hedge Funds Are Buying The Unilever Group (UL)

    The latest 13F reporting period has come and gone, and Insider Monkey is again at the forefront when it comes to making use of this gold mine of data. We have processed the filings of the more than 700 world-class investment firms that we track and now have access to the collective wisdom contained in […]

  • Hot Scoop! Ben & Jerry's Needs to Watch Out
    Bloomberg

    Hot Scoop! Ben & Jerry's Needs to Watch Out

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Nestle SA Chief Executive Officer Mark Schneider just proved his ability to be both strategic and creative as he methodically shapes the Swiss food giant, scooping and scraping up where he can.The company, which spans water, pet food and coffee, on Wednesday agreed to sell its U.S. ice cream business for $4 billion to Froneri, the joint venture it created three years ago with private equity group PAI Partners. The price equates to 2.2 times Nestle’s U.S. ice cream sales in 2018, similar to the multiple European rival Unilever NV achieved when it sold its spreads business to KKR & Co. almost exactly two years ago. That looks reasonable for Nestle’s unit, which includes the Haagen-Dazs brand in the U.S.With the sale, Schneider, a German-American educated at Harvard Business School, is very close to his target of changing up 10% of Nestle’s portfolio, helping to keep activist investor Dan Loeb happy. An outright sale would have been cleaner. But given that Froneri already holds Nestle’s European ice-cream assets, it was probably the easiest option.Nestle and PAI will each inject some funds into the joint venture to facilitate the deal. Even so Nestle should still receive between $3 billion and $4 billion in cash from the proceeds.Most importantly, there is scope for a fuller exit in time. PAI could acquire Nestle’s stake in the joint venture, or, more likely, the two could pursue an initial share sale for Froneri. Increasing sales growth, elevating profitability by developing Haagen-Dazs and cutting costs could potentially generate further value for Nestle in a few years’ time.That Nestle has been able to find a creative way to offload ice cream is encouraging. Schneider had already tackled many of the obvious disposal candidates within the group, including the U.S. confectionery and skincare divisions.Stay tuned for more. He may be equally imaginative with other parts of the group, such as its joint ventures in cereals with General Mills Inc., the U.S. maker of Cheerios, and in chilled dairy with Lactalis International, the French milk and cheese company.For example, Nestle has a few more ice cream divisions in Canada, Latin America and Asia that could be folded into Froneri in due course. But it’s likely Nestle didn’t want to rush it to avoid a bout of indigestion. There are other disposal candidates elsewhere in the group. It is already selling its Herta cooked meats business, while Bloomberg News has reported that it’s weighing the $1 billion sale of two Chinese brands.At least some parts of  the U.S. frozen-food division, such as pizzas, could be put on the block, although Nestle has so far stressed its commitment to staying in the business of frozen food. It doesn’t want to miss out on the latest trends with people cooking less and cutting down on meat, which has created a boom in vegetarian and vegan dishes. And although Nestle has restructured its waters business, indicating it wants to keep this division rather than offload it, it could always decide to carve out for sale the part that delivers bottles and dispensers directly to homes and offices.And of course there is Nestle’s stake in L’Oreal SA, although so far the group has remained committed to this. Nestle doesn’t need the money. Even with returning $20 billion to shareholders, year-end net debt is estimated just 1.4 times Ebitda. Deleveraging isn’t part of the strategy, indicating further capital returns. A wild card would be a big deal, for example in medical nutrition.In the meantime, it’s a question of delivering on Schneider’s strategy of steering a steady course between revenue-driven start-ups that make little profit and companies that prioritize margin expansion at the expense of investing in growth. So far, this has paid off for Nestle shareholders, with the stock up 27% this year. But the turn of events may be slightly worrying for Magnum owner Unilever, which now faces a more muscular competitor in ice cream.While Schneider has exhibited laser-like focus in M&A, Unilever’s relatively new CEO Alan Jope and incoming chairman, Nils Andersen, face the challenge of integrating the plethora of small acquisitions the Anglo-Dutch owner of Ben & Jerry’s has made over the past few years, all while trying to elevate sales growth.That was already a tall order. Now they’ll need to add avoiding a malfunction in the frozen aisle to their to-do list.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Ad agency founded by Britain’s ‘Mad Men’ issues profit warning, sending shares plunging 46%
    MarketWatch

    Ad agency founded by Britain’s ‘Mad Men’ issues profit warning, sending shares plunging 46%

    M&C Saatchi stock plunged on Wednesday after the world’s largest independent ad agency issued a profit warning and revealed its accounting scandal would have a greater impact.

  • Unilever names Braams as new marketing head in expanded role
    Reuters

    Unilever names Braams as new marketing head in expanded role

    Unilever Chief Executive Alan Jope had previously said https://www.marketingweek.com/unilever-keith-weeds-replacement-cmo the company would not hire a direct replacement for Weed, and instead would tack on additional responsibilities to the role of chief marketing officer, a job he described as "CMO++". Braams, currently executive vice president of middle Europe, joined Unilever in 1990, and has held a variety of marketing and general management roles across key European and Asian markets, Unilever said.

  • Urbem's 'Wonderful Business' Series: Estee Lauder
    GuruFocus.com

    Urbem's 'Wonderful Business' Series: Estee Lauder

    A moaty play on the SHEconomy and emerging markets Continue reading...

  • Business Wire

    Sundial Brands Announces New Social Mission Board and Executive Leadership

    Sundial Brands, a leading haircare and skincare company recognized for its innovative use of high-quality and culturally authentic ingredients and maker of brands including SheaMoisture, today announced that founder Richelieu Dennis will transition from his roles as Chair and CEO of the company to establish and lead Sundial’s new Social Mission Board, as well as focus on his new entrepreneurial ventures, effective immediately.

  • Unilever denies reports that its tea business is up for sale
    Reuters

    Unilever denies reports that its tea business is up for sale

    "Contrary to reports, we are not exploring a sale of our tea business," a Unilever spokeswoman told Reuters. "PG Tips and Lipton are very popular brands, and although growth of black tea in developed markets has slowed down,...we are focused on turning this around, while also expanding the brands into herbal teas and other segments that are growing," she said.

  • TEST Business Wire Releases

    RECALL: Lipton, Knorr, and LeGoût Products Affected by a Poultry Recall

    Unilever United States is voluntarily recalling a limited quantity of Lipton, Knorr, and LeGoût chicken products that contain chicken from a supplier, which issued a recall on its poultry for potential contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

  • Can We See Significant Institutional Ownership On The The Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) Share Register?
    Simply Wall St.

    Can We See Significant Institutional Ownership On The The Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) Share Register?

    A look at the shareholders of The Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) can tell us which group is most powerful. Large companies...

  • Fires and Floods Make Saudi Aramco IPO a Hard Sell
    Bloomberg

    Fires and Floods Make Saudi Aramco IPO a Hard Sell

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It is a bad time to buy into an oil company whose major asset is reserves in the ground that can sustain current production levels of the carbon-laden fossil fuel until near the end of the century. Oil lost its place in the power generation market after the oil shocks of the 1970s, and it is now starting to see serious competition for powering cars, buses and trucks along with the first signs of viable alternatives for fueling maritime transport. Oil’s domination in air transport looks safer for now, and the industry forecasts the strongest growth in petrochemicals that go into everything from plastics and fertilizers to electronic gadgets and clothing. But the tide of history is moving firmly against fossil fuels.Saudi Aramco may boast that it holds the rights to the largest reserves of crude with the lowest carbon footprint to extract, but that rather misses the point. The climate concerns around oil are not about the carbon cost of getting it out of the ground, but of what is done with it afterward.The oil age may not be over — far from it — but oil is facing unprecedented headwinds. Here’s a sample from recent weeks and months:Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro said last week that climate change is menacing the historic maritime city, which suffered its second-highest tide on record. Parts of northern England are suffering their worst flooding in decades, and millions were displaced as Cyclone Bulbul hit Bangladesh and northern India.Storms and floods are not new, but they are becoming more severe, more frequent and causing more damage as sea levels rise and the climate changes — developments that are linked, at least in part, to the burning of fossil fuels.Unprecedented bushfires are ravaging parts of eastern Australia rendered tinderbox dry by a two-year drought. Wildfires forced hundreds of thousands of Californians to flee their homes earlier this month. Russia is suffering one of its worst years this century for forest fires. Once again, climate change is contributing to the creation of the hot, dry conditions that have allowed the fires to spread.Climate change is also melting Russia’s permafrost. Not a problem for Saudi Aramco, perhaps, but certainly one for Russia’s oil industry, which relies on infrastructure built in the 1970s on ground that is no longer able to support the weight it was 40 years ago.Mounting climate concerns are inexorably turning public opinion against hydrocarbons, including oil.What’s more, pollution caused by leaking pipelines, accidents involving oil tankers, or drilling rigs are all increasing the pressure on the oil and gas industry.  Particulate emissions from burning fossil fuels are behind elevated mortality rates, leading to stricter controls on ship fuels, measures to push cars and vans out of city centers and increasing pressure on airlines to find alternatives.Aramco has a solution to the predicament the industry is in — petrochemicals. The company wants to turn 40% of its crude into chemicals, according to Abdulaziz Al-Judaimi, Saudi Aramco’s senior vice president for downstream. But petrochemicals are under pressure, too.Globally more than 200 businesses, from Coca-Cola Co. to food and consumer goods giant Unilever NV  have made commitments to reduce plastic waste, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. Unilever aims to halve its use of virgin plastic by 2025. Coca-Cola’s goal is for its bottles to contain an average of 50% recycled content by 2030. Initiatives like those will make a serious dent in the projected demand for new plastics.And then there’s an issue that is specific to Saudi Aramco — the security of its facilities. The company did a spectacular job of restoring output levels after a devastating attack on its oil facilities in September, using spare capacity elsewhere to boost flows. But the very fact of the attacks has raised concerns among potential investors about Saudi Arabia’s ability to protect its oil infrastructure.The time to bring private investors into Saudi Aramco was when everybody wanted a piece of the action. Twenty years ago investors would have fallen over each other beating a path to Saudi Aramco’s door. It’s a much tougher sell now.To contact the author of this story: Julian Lee at jlee1627@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Julian Lee is an oil strategist for Bloomberg. Previously he worked as a senior analyst at the Centre for Global Energy Studies.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    Unilever Stock Edges Up after Chairman’s Sudden Resignation

    (ULVR)’s stock edged up on Wednesday as the consumer goods giant’s chairman abruptly resigned. Marijn Dekkers was behind a failed bid to move the company’s headquarters from London to Rotterdam, which was met by a shareholder revolt. The Anglo-Dutch company had announced a partnership with Burger King to supply a new plant-based Rebel Whopper burger across Europe just a day earlier.

  • Unilever Chairman Leaves $162 Billion Role to Run $85 Million Fund
    Bloomberg

    Unilever Chairman Leaves $162 Billion Role to Run $85 Million Fund

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- And then there were none.Almost exactly a year after Unilever NV announced the departure of chief executive officer Paul Polman, the consumer goods giant’s chairman Marijn Dekkers is stepping down with immediate effect. Nils Andersen, a non-executive director since 2015, will replace him.In one sense it’s a natural time for a change. Dekkers has overseen the CEO succession, with Alan Jope starting last January. Unless something goes horribly wrong, that should be off the agenda for some time. Yet it jars that the chairman is leaving the post immediately after filling it for just three years.Unilever says he wants to concentrate on his responsibilities as founder and chairman of Novalis LifeSciences, an investment and advisory firm for the drugmaking industry. Novalis recently raised $85 million and plans to invest in at least eight companies. The suggestion was that this didn’t leave much time for leading the board of Unilever, whose market value is 147 billion euros ($162 billion).Dekkers, a former CEO of Bayer AG, will stay as a non-executive director. It’s strange nonetheless that Unilever didn’t wait until its annual shareholder meeting in April before standing him down. It’s hard not to link the wholesale change at the top of the Anglo-Dutch company to its botched attempt to simplify into a single Netherlands-based organization.After this unification effort was abandoned last year, the future of Unilever’s dual-headed corporate structure is unresolved. Andersen will need to address this, especially if the company wants to spin off its food business or use its shares to make a big acquisition in the U.S. Having two classes of shares makes this more difficult.That the new chairman is neither British nor Dutch (he’s Danish) is helpful given that the future domicile will probably be on the agenda again. However, hiring an outsider would have been better still for tackling such a profound question; Jope is a Unilever lifer.The new CEO may now find himself confronted by a stronger chairman given that Dekkers was damaged by the unification debacle. Andersen has relevant experience too: He was chief executive of the brewer Carlsberg A/S between 2001 and 2007.Jope has a difficult enough task in accelerating sales growth, which has been stubbornly sluggish despite Unilever’s strong portfolio of brands and enviable emerging market exposure. Making a success of the company’s many acquisitions, from fake meat to premium laundry, is another priority. Integrating these businesses, often created by entrepreneurial founders, into the Unilever culture isn’t easy.Longer term, Jope and Andersen must decide whether to stick with the food business after Unilver sold its spreads arm in 2017, or whether to go all in on the faster growing beauty and personal care brands. If they do decide on radical change, it will need to be better executed than the plan to ditch the British headquartersTo contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Unilever Chairman Marijn Dekkers steps down
    MarketWatch

    Unilever Chairman Marijn Dekkers steps down

    Unilever PLC said Wednesday that Chairman Marijn Dekkers is stepping down from the board with immediate effect, and that Nils Andersen will replace him.

  • Unilever appoints Nils Andersen as chairman, replacing Dekkers
    Reuters

    Unilever appoints Nils Andersen as chairman, replacing Dekkers

    Andersen, a non-executive director on Unilever's board since 2015, comes in alongside Scotsman Alan Jope who took over as CEO earlier this year. Jope wants to carve out more market share for Unilever's foods, but faces a challenge in low-growth categories like tea, bouillon, mayo and condiments.

  • Investing.com

    Premarket London: SSE Profit Rises; Wizz Air Soars

    Investing.com -- Here is a rundown of the regulatory news releases from the London Stock Exchange on Wednesday, 13th November. Please refresh for updates.

  • Burger King launching plant-based Whopper in Europe
    MarketWatch

    Burger King launching plant-based Whopper in Europe

    Burger King is introducing a plant-based burger in Europe. But it’s not the Impossible Whopper that’s been a hit with U.S. customers.