VHT - Vanguard Health Care Index Fund ETF Shares

NYSEArca - NYSEArca Delayed Price. Currency in USD
161.47
+0.33 (+0.20%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close161.14
Open161.69
Bid158.72 x 800
Ask164.37 x 900
Day's Range159.00 - 162.52
52 Week Range149.55 - 181.92
Volume461,041
Avg. Volume282,014
Net Assets10.71B
NAV161.24
PE Ratio (TTM)66.86
Yield1.70%
YTD Return1.09%
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.07
Expense Ratio (net)0.10%
Inception Date2004-01-26
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Can Q1 Earnings Lift Healthcare ETFs Higher?
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    With negative earnings revisions, the healthcare sector is expected to witness earnings growth of 1.8% in the first quarter, suggesting smooth trading for healthcare ETFs.

  • UnitedHealth Falls Despite Q1 Beat, Healthcare ETFs in Focus
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  • The Market Is Strong, Even With Rising Risks — What to Buy Now?
    InvestorPlace4 days ago

    The Market Is Strong, Even With Rising Risks — What to Buy Now?

    Stocks are up over 16% so far this year, as tracked by the S&P 500 Index. That's astonishing given that last year, from the start to the top on Sept. 20, 2018, the S&P 500 Index was up only 9.62%.S&P 500 Index Total Return Source BloombergInvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsSo, what's driving all of the buying?I'll start with FOMO. Fear of missing out is a powerful motivator in the markets -- the idea that if you don't get in and buy, you'll miss out on the big rally. I believe that's a big part of getting more investors, from hedge funds to individuals, to reduce their money market funds or buying power in their brokerage accounts and shift to stocks.And as the market builds on gains and the financial and Main Street media reports more and more on the upward progress, it only fuels the buying. And this isn't a new thing. Take any of the past big up market moves of the past decades and you'll see FOMO kick in and remain until fear takes over after some big down days. We saw examples of that at the start of February and October of last year. * 10 S&P 500 Stocks to Weather the Earnings Storm Next is the Federal Reserve and its Open Market Committee (FOMC). The FOMC bungled its messaging last year. It laid out the plan to watch core inflation as measured by the Personal Consumption Expenditure Index (PCE) and said it wanted to see the PCE reach 2% and then some before it would need to act. Then it acted anyway, reducing the bond portfolio and stoking fears of more aggressive actions alongside raising its target range for Fed Funds.Then, with the stock market slipping and politics coming in on the play, it punted, and now it's pretty clear that it's going to be passive for a while. This means that the bond market will continue to be supported with the FOMC keeping its bond portfolio more or less intact. And with easy money with interest rates still not far from post-crisis levels, the credit market supports a buoyant stock market.Moving it forward is the concept of Modern Monetary Theory or MMT. This is a spin on an old theory attributed to many, including German economist George Knapp. And in very brief summary, MMT holds that the government that issues fiat money can do so largely at will and can control inflation via taxes or bond issuance. This way, government can spend at nearly at will.Of course, this works until it doesn't, when money isn't recognized, and no one will buy government bonds except the central bank.But it is being rolled out as a politically pleasing means of not only keeping the FOMC's bond portfolio, but potentially for having even larger government budgetary spending for all sorts of things.Next up is the bond market. The U.S. 10-year Treasury is sitting near 2.59% and remains well bought in the market. This, in turn, is aiding the market for mortgages, which lenders and traders use as benchmarks for modeling prices and yields. So, mortgage rates should remain low, providing further economic stimulus as well as consumer confidence all good for stocks.And it isn't just because of the FOMC. Demand by bond buyers, from wealthy investors to insurance companies and pension funds, remains strong. And given the demographics of the U.S. market aging further, that demand should keep a lid on yields for a while.And in turn, with lower Treasury yields, the corporate and other bonds, including municipal bonds, look even more attractive for the same bond investors -- all helping the economy and the general stock market.And last up is the U.S. dollar. The dollar, as measured by the Bloomberg US dollar Index, which tracks a basket of 10 major currencies, is up nearly 7% over the past year. That makes the U.S. a prime destination for global investment.This shows up in U.S. Treasury tracking of foreign government and private inflows of capital that are buying U.S. stocks and bonds. And while there were some outflows in the downturn in the fourth quarter for U.S. stocks, overall, the net amount of foreign investment in the U.S. is vastly higher in the most recent data than were it was back in 2016.And all of this comes as the underlying themes that I've been writing about recently about consumer comfort and business confidence to invest in long-term capital spending remain intact. The Big WorryNow, where will the cracks show up?I think that the biggest risk for the U.S. stock market is the reality of company performance. One of the reasons for the selloff in the fourth quarter last year was the fear that sales growth and, more importantly, earnings growth would slow from the stellar numbers of last year into 2019.For the fourth calendar quarter of 2018, the members of the S&P 500 Index reported sales growth, on average, about 6% and earnings growth around 12%. But what may be coming for the coming quarters looks a lot slower. And so far, as earnings for the first calendar quarter are rolling in, it has been a mixed bag with more risks on the horizon in the coming weeks. Tech Stocks -- Stocks to Buy, or Topping Out?This is particularly threatening for the information technology sector. This segment of the S&P 500 Index has been a big driver of the performance of the index this year, and is one of the more highly valued. Any disappointments in the earnings from the first calendar quarter of this year will most likely have a negative impact on the overall index -- and the market.So, while many companies turned in some nice numbers from the fourth quarter, the risk is that as more folks take a look at the expectations for slowed growth in sales and earnings, the compelling case to buy fades and selling comes back.Source: BloombergAnd at the core of the risk sector would be the information technology stocks, particularly found in exchange-traded funds (ETFs) such as Vanguard's Information Technology ETF (NYSEARCA:VGT). This ETF has soared, with a price gain alone from Dec. 24, 2018 to date of over 35%. It is the underlying, synthetically represented stocks that have the greatest risk for earnings disappointment.This is why I continue to recommend plenty of safer, more income-focused investments and defensive investments in the model portfolios of my Profitable Investing.But that said, I do believe that even in some downturns for the general market that there are plenty of stocks in industries that worked in tougher times and will work going forward. But above all else -- keep your focus on the dividend and income paying investments right now.Source: BloombergIn particular, look at a few key segments stating with real estate investment trusts (REITs). REITs have been one of the stellar performing sectors but still remains a value. The Bloomberg US REITs Index has generated a trailing year's return of 19% and was one of the better-performing indexes, losing less during the broad U.S. stock selloff in the fourth quarter of 2018 than many peers. One of the easiest means for synthetic exposure is in the Vanguard Real Estate ETF (NYSEARCA:VNQ).Source: BloombergNext is the utilities market sector. Again, like with REITs, utilities provide defense with better yield and the added benefit of having both regulated and unregulated businesses. The S&P 500 Utilities Index has a trailing year's return of 19% and was again a better performer during the selloff late last year. The go-to ETF for exposure can be found in the Vanguard Utilities ETF (NYSEARCA:VPU).Source: BloombergAnd last up is the healthcare sector. With U.S. healthcare spending solidly on the rise -- regrettably due to an ever-aging and more unhealthy population -- this makes for a defensive sector with growth still in the works. The ETF for broad synthetic exposure is the Vanguard Health ETF (NYSEARCA:VHT).The key to dealing with a toppy-looking market is to be aware of what got it there, the threats that are rising and where to begin to diversify ahead of the next pull-back or sell-off.Neil George is the editor of Profitable Investing and does not have any holdings in the securities mentioned above. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Stocks to Buy for Spring Season Growth * This Is How You Beat Back a Bear Market * 7 Dental Stocks to Buy That Will Make You Smile Compare Brokers The post The Market Is Strong, Even With Rising Risks -- What to Buy Now? appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • JNJ Beats, Ups Sales Growth View: Healthcare ETFs in Focus
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  • Health Day Checkup of Medical ETFs: 5 Top Picks
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  • InvestorPlacelast month

    Invest in America’s Rising Healthcare Costs With These Stocks

    Not a day goes by that healthcare costs aren't being discussed across each corner of media. With the 2020 election now underway, politicos are ratcheting up the rhetoric over healthcare costs and the political ads are already spinning the topic. And all of this is for good reason. Healthcare costs in the U.S. are high and rapidly rising, especially if you're of retirement age. According to the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) -- healthcare spending increased in 2017 by 3.90% to $3.9 trillion or $10,739 per person. This represents 17.90% of the then gross domestic product of the U.S. (GDP). In fact, in a recently published book, More than Medicine: The Broken Promise of American Health by Bob Kaplan, he argues that the U.S. pays way more than its mature economic peers.For example, the U.S. pays 18% of its gross domestic product (GDP) on healthcare whereas the European Union (E.U.) only pays 10% of its combined GDP. And, to make it worse, the U.S. has a lower life expectancy than many nations around the globe. Add in a high poverty rate, which can lead to further health challenges for young and old and other factors showing health troubles, including infant mortality, and the nation doesn't look too healthy. American healthcare may well get even more expensive, as the U.S. ages and becomes less healthy by the day. This isn't a good mix for one of the leading economies of the planet.In a recent study by the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. Census, by 2035, it is projected that 78 million folks will be 65 years or older. That same year, those at or under the age of 18 years will number just 76 million. America is becoming a nation of the elderly -- a significant change in the demographics of a nation traditionally known for its healthy and able folks. It's a shift that leaves many wondering where our economic productivity gains will come from. And, as we know, the elderly population requires the most attentive healthcare … no wonder healthcare spending is climbing.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * 10 Stocks on the Rise Heading Into the Second Quarter While this sounds bleak, there is a silver lining here for us as investors. And no, I'm not suggesting that we look at gym companies (although I am poking around at that market with some innovations that I'll be writing about in Profitable Investing in the near future). Rather, I'm suggesting that investing in healthcare stocks that pay dividends is a smart source for capital gains … WP Carey Click to Enlarge Source: Bloomberg One healthcare stock, in particular, comes to mind … I'm referring to WP Carey (NYSE:WPC), which I've written about extensively for InvestorPlace.WP Carey is a REIT, which since coming to the public market, has generated a return of 1,348.28% for an average annual equivalent return of 13.46%. That's not too shabby any way you cut it. The business itself is a curious one: WP Carey doesn't operate its properties, and it doesn't pay for maintenance, insurance, or taxes. Instead, it executes "triple net leases." This means that it locks up long-term cashflows with less risk in rising costs for the properties and the vagrancies of tax rates.Its tenants pay for all of that, thus WP Carey profits from other peoples' money.In the healthcare market, there is a specific equivalent in the following security. Well, this next security is technically a real estate investment trust (REIT) that owns and acquires healthcare facilities including inpatient and outpatient facilities as well as surgical centers and specialty healthcare facilities. Their properties amount to more than 120 properties in 25 states as well as some newer innovative investments in Germany. Scroll down to discover what it is … Medical Properties Trust (MPW) Click to Enlarge Source: Bloomberg Medical Properties Trust (NYSE:MPW) has properties that are leased on a net basis to operators that run the facilities and pay rent month after month for years. The portfolio has expanded dramatically over the recent year with only a small pause in the past year. But it continues to look to expand its portfolio with the right properties in an ever-expanding market.Revenues are climbing with gains running at over 11.30% in just the trailing year. And the funds from operations (FFO) which measures just the return rate from the cashflows from the property portfolio is ample at 11.60%, which is impressive for the REIT space. This contributes to an impressive return on its assets at 11.40% and is what delivers for shareholders with a return on equity of 24.30%.And the stock continues to reflect its performance as a company. Over the past ten years, the stock has delivered a total return of 994.12% for an average annual equivalent of 26.79%. It is a disciplined company when it comes to debt and leverage as its debt to capital is at only 47.00%. This provides the ability to easily service its current debts and provides eased access for credit to fund additional acquisitions. Valued at only 1.49 times its book value, MPW is a steal from a price-book (P/B) perspective. This ratio has climbed significantly over the trailing year, from 1.14 times back in October 2018.But it isn't just the P/B ratio that's rising, but the actual value of the assets. Over the past five years alone, the underlying book value per share has gone from $7.98 to a current $12.27, which represents an impressive gain of 53.76%. This is important as it shows genuine growth in the underlying company and not just the stock price. The dividend is currently at 25 cents per share and has been climbing in distribution by an average annual rate of 4.30% over the past five years. This equates to a current yield of 5.48%. * Top 7 Service Sector Stocks That Will Pay You to Own Them Medical Properties Trust makes for a great buy in the healthcare market (which should be purchased in a taxable account). This is due to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) which provides a tax deduction of 20% of the dividend distribution for U.S. individual investors making the taxable equivalent yield even higher. Other Stocks to Play HealthcareInside the Profitable Investing model portfolios, I have the overall market for healthcare synthetically invested in the Vanguard Healthcare ETF (NYSEARCA:VHT), which remains a buy in a tax-free account. Then, in my Incredible Dividend Machine portfolio inside Profitable Investing, I have three more plays on healthcare …I have the drugmaker Merck (NYSE:MRK), which continues to perform for shareholders. And I have another drugmaker in Pfizer (NYSE:PFE), which follows the success of Merck. Further, I also have Ventas (NYSE:VTR), which as a real estate investment trust (REIT) that owns a series of senior healthcare and related housing care facilities. VTR is doing quite well with the general REIT sector as we move further into 2019.One of the smartest investment lessons that I learned, from one of my best stocks within Profitable Investing, is to capitalize when the opportunity arises. That is, take risks while you lock in revenues! And the aforementioned stocks should continue to position themselves into the thick of the rising healthcare spending market while paying out an ample and rising dividend.Neil George is the editor of Profitable Investing and does not have any holdings in the securities mentioned above. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Invincible Stocks Leading The Bull Market Higher * 5 Dow Jones Stocks Coming to Life * 7 of the Best High-Yield Funds for 2019 and Beyond Compare Brokers The post Invest in America's Rising Healthcare Costs With These Stocks appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • InvestorPlacelast month

    5 Mutual Funds With Huge Minimum Investments

    One of the primary reasons so many advisors and investors gravitate to ETFs over mutual funds is the low fees available on ETFs. An often overlooked reason why so many retail investors embrace ETFs over mutual funds is minimum investments.As in many mutual funds require minimum investments while no ETFs do. Some mutual funds have tolerable minimum investments of $500 or $1,000. Others start at $2,500 or $3,000 while some other mutual funds require minimum investments that makes these funds off-limits to a large portion of investors.Another irksome point about mutual funds' minimum investments that the higher the required investment, the lower a fund's fees are likely to be. With ETFs, the expense ratio is the expense ratio, regardless of how much investors put into the fund.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips"The main thing to understand is that the lower the investment minimum, the higher the expense ratio usually is," according to Morningstar. "The reasoning is that it's more difficult to maintain many accounts with low balances than fewer accounts with lots of assets. So although the strategy and investment portfolio (and investment manager, if applicable) are the same across all share classes, the expense ratios will differ." * 7 Top Stocks to Buy From Goldman Sachs' Secret Portfolio Here are some examples of mutual funds with minimum investments that are likely to catch investors' eyes -- but not in a good way. Vanguard S&P Mid-Cap 400 Index Fund Institutional Shares (VSPMX)Minimum investment: $5,000,000.No need to do a double-take. The Vanguard S&P Mid-Cap 400 Index Fund Institutional Shares (MUTF:VSPMX) really does have a minimum investment of $5,000,000, according to Vanguard data.In fairness to this Vanguard mutual fund, VSPMX, at its name implies, is the institutional share class of a mutual fund with several share classes. But all of these have required investments that are significantly lower than $5,000,000.And for investors that want to dodge minimum investments altogether, the this mutual fund is available in ETF form via Vanguard S&P MidCap 400 ETF (NYSEARCA:IVOO). That ETF charges just 0.15% per year. Vanguard Health Care Fund Investor Shares (VGHCX)Minimum investment: $3,000There was a time when the Vanguard Health Care Fund Investor Shares (MUTF:VGHCX) had a minimum investment that was far higher than the $3,000 investors see today. This is an actively managed healthcare mutual fund with a lengthy track record."For more than 25 years, this actively managed fund has offered investors low-cost exposure to domestic and foreign companies involved in various aspects of the health care industry, such as pharmaceutical firms, medical supply companies, and research firms," according to Vanguard. * 5 Warren Buffett Stocks You Can't Go Wrong With While it is not an ETF replica of VGHCX, the Vanguard Health Care ETF (NYSEARCA:VHT) is a suitable alternative for investors looking for lower-fee, no minimum investment product. VHT charges just 0.10% per year, making it one of the least expensive healthcare funds -- ETF or mutual fund -- on the market. Calamos Convertible I (CICVX)Minimum Investment: $1,000,000This share class of the Calamos Convertible I (MUTF:CICVX) really does require a minimum investment of $1,000,000. Fortunately, the issuer has a pair of other share classes for this mutual fund that have much more reasonable minimum investments of $500.Convertible bonds are popular with some fixed income investors because the bonds can be converted into common stock of the issuing company, giving convertibles higher correlations to stocks than other fixed income asset classes. Plus, convertibles often perform well when interest rates rise.Over half the bonds in this mutual fund are issued by technology and healthcare companies. The fund has a 30-day SEC yield of 1%. AQR Large Cap Defensive Style Fund (AUEIX)Minimum investment: $100,000 or $5,000,000The AQR Large Cap Defensive Style Fund Class I (MUTF:AUEIX) has a minimum investment of $100,000, but that is only for institutional investors. Individual investors that want to get involved with mutual fund face a minimum investment of $5,000,000, according to issuer data.Hey, at least this mutual fund does not have loads or redemption fees. In many ways, AUEIX is a standard large-cap mutual fund, looking to capture upside in bull markets while potentially experiencing less downside when markets decline. * 7 Growth Stocks Racing to All-Time Highs At the end of last year, AUEIX allocated almost a third of its combined weight to the defensive healthcare and consumer staples sectors. Technology and financial services stocks combined for 29.40% of the mutual fund's weight. Vanguard Consumer Staples Index Fund Admiral Shares (VCSAX)Minimum investment: $100,000.This is another case of a particular share class of a Vanguard mutual fund carrying a high required investment while also having several more affordable share classes. The Vanguard Consumer Staples Index Fund Admiral Shares (MUTF:VCSAX) is an index fund, not a mutual fund, tracking a sector that is popular with conservative, income-oriented investors.This mutual fund's roster "includes stocks of companies that provide direct-to-consumer products that, based on consumer spending habits, are considered essential to daily life," according to Vanguard.Investors can dodge the required minimum investment with the Vanguard Consumer Staples ETF (NYSEARCA:VDC), which is also one of the least expensive staples ETFs on the market.Todd Shriber does not own any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Growth Stocks Racing to All-Time Highs * 5 Warren Buffett Stocks You Can't Go Wrong With * Game On for These 3 Gaming Stocks Compare Brokers The post 5 Mutual Funds With Huge Minimum Investments appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • 7 of the Best ETFs to Buy for a Rock-Solid Portfolio
    InvestorPlace2 months ago

    7 of the Best ETFs to Buy for a Rock-Solid Portfolio

    The U.S. economy and markets are providing a collection of tailwinds for specific industries and investments. And it is resulting in a buoyant general stock market that has the S&P 500 Index up 11.25% year-to-date.But rather than just betting on the general stock market, I have a collection of market segments that will help you construct a better overall portfolio for growth and income, all with less risk and better-balanced returns for the year. * 10 Blue-Chip Stocks to Lead the Market Specifically, I'm talking about a few key exchange-traded funds (ETFs) to buy. With that said, let's dive into the best ETFs to buy for specific sectors.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsSource: Bloomberg BanksI'll start with one of the most stellar market segments that you've probably been ignoring: regional banks. Mention regional banks and many investors will yawn and look away, but this is not only one of the best performing segments of the stock market, but also one of the cheapest values right now. Here's the lead, the regional bank stocks embodied in the KBW Regional Bank Index as synthetically represented in the SPDR S&P Regional Banking ETF (NYSEARCA:KRE) has generated a YTD return of 20.88%.That's of course more than twice the S&P Index and there is more to come. Banks have been hobbled by legislative and administrative regulation over the past decade following the financial crisis of 2007-2008. The result has been that banking became a treacherous business resulting in the high-cost of loan origination as well as other consumer and business bank products. But last year saw a series of legislative reforms as well as administrative changes to provide relief for banks -- particularly for regional and smaller banks.In addition, with the Federal Reserve Bank's Open Market Committee (FOMC) working to guide interest rates to more normalized levels, banks have begun to have breathing room to better price deposits and loans resulting in higher net interest margins.Then there is the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA), which has resulted in improving net profitability for domestic banks.The stock market didn't really care until now. But since many of the quality banks in the KRE ETF are still valued at either discounts or smaller premiums of book value than traditionally valued, banks are still very good value.Source: Bloomberg REITsNext up is another market segment that's done better than the S&P 500 for the year while continuing to provide better performance over last year as well. Real estate investment trusts (REITs) continue to benefit from the stronger U.S. economy, which fosters demand for properties and supports rising lease income. The result is that REITs are being recognized for their underlying good assets on top of the higher yields offered. * 10 Monthly Dividend Stocks to Buy to Pay the Bills One of the best REIT ETFs to buy is the Vanguard Real Estate ETF (NYSEARCA:VNQ). This ETF has exposure to some of the best REITs in the U.S. market. The YTD return is running at 11.87%. Moreover, REITs, much like banks noted above are still valued at a lower price-to-book ratio than tradition levels pre-2007. Add in the additional benefit of the TCJA providing individual investors with a 20% deduction of taxable income from REIT dividends and the REIT space looks even more lucrative.Source: Bloomberg Preferred StockSimilar to the other investment segments above, preferred stock is another overlooked sector of the market. Preferred stock provides a bond-like investment with higher established dividend yields that can be depended upon for income in any portfolio. And they also provide a good backstop for portfolios when, not just if, the general common stock market takes a pause or worse.Preferred stocks are faring well so far this year. And one of the easiest means for "synthetically" investing is in the iShares Preferred & Income Securities ETF (NASDAQ:PFF). The ETF has turned in a YTD return of 6.20%. And it offers a nice dividend yield currently running at 5.61%.Source: Bloomberg UtilitiesUtilities also provided a good alternative to the general stock market's downturns last year. And so far this year, utilities continue to perform well. Utilities are typically structured between regulated and unregulated business units. The regulated businesses provide core local essential services with rate charges and margins set by local public utility commissions (PUCs). This provides dependable profits that form the base for reliable dividends making utilities good hedges for vacillating general stock markets.The unregulated businesses are typically ancillary activities on a national or global scale often involving power generation and transmission or pipeline operations. It is this side of the utilities that provides companies and their shareholders with further growth opportunities as well as higher dividend distributions. * 8 Cheap Stocks That Cost Less Than $10 One of the best ETFs to invest in the utilities segment is the Vanguard Utilities ETF (NYSEARCA:VPU). The ETF has a YTD return of 7.02% and provides exposure to a great collection of utilities with regulated and unregulated business units. In addition, it also generates and pays a nice dividend along the way currently yielding 3.22%.Source: Bloomberg HealthcareThe U.S. is a nation that is aging and becoming ever less healthy. This isn't a good mix for one of the leading economies of the planet. In a recent study by the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. Census, by 2035, which is not that far away, it is projected that 78 million folks will be 65 years or older. And by that same year, those at or under the age of 18 years will be 76 million.This will be a significant change in the demographics of the nation, which has traditionally been a younger nation with more healthy and able folks to produce more for the economy.And it gets worse when it comes to the health of the overall population whether old or young. The Mayo Clinic recently released its extensive study of the health of the population and is saying that 3% or less is living a healthy lifestyle. This is not surprising as all that it takes is to take a stroll around many neighborhoods around the nation and do some people watching. We are a nation of fatter people that don't look like they could run up a flight of stairs let alone walk up one.The U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) just released a study and survey that indicates that 36.50% of the U.S. population is obese. This sets up the nation for more diabetes and all of the ancillary health effects of that disease. And then there is heart health and its complications. And if you're obese, slipping and falling is easier to do resulting in more injury risks.Add in a high poverty rate which can lead to further health challenges for young and old and other factors showing health troubles, including infant mortality and the nation doesn't look too healthy.And of course, last year we saw that life expectancy in the U.S. population stopped seeing improvements with some segments dropping in life years still to come. And as we know, the end of the line is where healthcare really ramps up to keep those alive a bit longer.No wonder that healthcare spending is big in the U.S. and climbing quickly. According to the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), healthcare spending increased in 2017 by 3.90% to $3.9 trillion or $10,739 per person. This represents 17.90% of the then gross domestic product of the U.S. (GDP).And it is getting worse. The CMS projects that spending between 2017 through 2016 will continue to rise by an average annual rate of 5.50%, reaching $5.7 trillion. And given projections for GDP for the period, that would come closer to 20% of the overall economy.Now this isn't good news for the U.S. population, but it does provide for a silver lining for us as investors as investing in health is a good source for income and gains, even though they come from the increasingly ill of the economy.One of the best ways to get general exposure to the healthcare market is through the Vanguard Health Care ETF (NYSEARCA:VHT). This ETF has generated a YTD return of 8.11% and provides for well-diversified exposure to the leading healthcare stocks in the U.S. market.Source: Bloomberg Information TechnologyInformation technology continues to be one of the more exciting market segments that is easy to grab the attention of individual investors. After all, who doesn't like the latest new gotta-have gadgets whether in hand-held devices or the latest apps. This segment has plenty of companies that grab headlines and consumers' interest year in and year out.But one of the bigger stories isn't just about the next new-new thing, but rather the new way of making profits. More technology companies are moving away from depending on unit sales of gizmos and apps and more toward subscription sales. This is resulting in the rise of recurring income, which is not only more reliable than one-off unit sales, but it also provides the ability for technology companies to build-up their technology empires with more certainty.The result is that the companies in this space that have been successfully shifting to recurring income are driving more profits and better performing shares. That was the case last year in the segment generating positive returns, but also so far this year. * 7 of the Best Biotech ETFs The easy way to invest in the best of the information technology segment is in the Vanguard Information Technology ETF (NYSEARCA:VGT). This ETF has generated a YTD return of a whopping 15.98% and given the demand for the underlying products and services including for cloud computing and the emergence of fifth-generation wireless communications (5G), this segment and the ETF should remain in the green for the year.Source: Bloomberg Oil & GasOil and gas remain a lucrative market as the U.S. continues to emerge as the world's leading producer of the petrol patch. Global demand remains robust for crude oil and refined products and natural gas particularly in more easily transportable liquified natural gas (LNG) is driving profits for U.S. companies.In addition, the softer pricing, particularly for crude oil, prior to last year provided the incentive for producers to increase their field exploration and production (E&P) efficiencies. This, in turn, is providing for profitability, even at lower crude oil and natural gas prices.And one of the limitations for U.S. companies has been the lack of additional capacities in pipeline and marine terminal facilities for both oil and gas. But thankfully to the current administration, approvals have spurred additional and expanded lines and facilities providing for more deliverable petrol for more cashflows for U.S. companies.And then we have the Organization of Petroleum Producing Countries plus Russia (OPEC+). OPEC+ has come through with production limits which is also aiding petrol prices and operating margins for U.S. petroleum companies.The best ETF to invest in this segment is the Energy Select Sector SPDR ETF (NYSEARCA:XLE). This ETF has exposure to the up, down and midstream petrol companies. And it has generated a great YTD return of 15.29% with many inside the market segment still valued at lower levels of underlying book and trailing sales. Add in the dividend yield of 3.22%, and it makes for another in my collection of best ETFs for growth and income.Neil George is the editor of Profitable Investing and does not have any holdings in the securities mentioned above. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Consumer Stocks to Buy and Hold for Years * 4 China Stocks Soaring on Trade Hopes * 3 Esports Stocks to Benefit From the Boom Compare Brokers The post 7 of the Best ETFs to Buy for a Rock-Solid Portfolio appeared first on InvestorPlace.

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