VIACA - ViacomCBS Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
32.80
-0.90 (-2.67%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous Close33.70
Open32.87
Bid0.00 x 800
Ask0.00 x 1800
Day's Range32.52 - 33.49
52 Week Range32.52 - 46.90
Volume134,832
Avg. Volume69,433
Market Cap17.764B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.26
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.96 (2.85%)
Ex-Dividend DateMar 12, 2020
1y Target EstN/A
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  • Tech Leads Stock Slide on Virus Fears; Gold Gains: Markets Wrap
    Bloomberg

    Tech Leads Stock Slide on Virus Fears; Gold Gains: Markets Wrap

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. equities slumped on concern that the coronavirus that originated in China will take a heavy toll on corporate earnings. The dollar jumped and gold climbed to a seven-year high as investors sought havens.Microsoft Corp., Apple Inc. and other big tech names led losses after Japan reported two deaths and South Korea confirmed its first fatality from the disease amid a report the illness was spreading in Beijing. ViacomCBS Inc. tumbled after sales missed estimates, while Morgan Stanley dropped after agreeing to buy E*Trade Financial Corp. for $13 billion. The S&P 500 Index pared the worst of its decline in the afternoon amid gains for automakers and real-estate companies.The yen extended its fall toward 112 per dollar amid disappointing economic news and early positioning before the fiscal year-end next month. Treasuries rallied.Sentiment turned negative Thursday, a day after equities reached record highs, as the infection that originated in China continues to expand beyond the mainland. Earnings misses are adding to the gloom, alongside fresh warnings on the pathogen’s impact from A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S, the world’s largest container shipping firm, and Air France-KLM. Goldman Sachs Group Inc.’s chief equity strategist said a near-term correction for the stock market is looking more probable.“It could be some larger players hedging against downside risk of the coronavirus spreading,” said Chris Zaccarelli, chief investment officer at Independent Advisor Alliance. “That, on top of the Goldman call that a correction is more likely, has people on edge.”Elsewhere, subpar results from AXA SA and Telefonica SA weighed on European equity gauges. Asia stocks traded mixed. Oil gained in New York.Here are some key events coming up:Earnings season rolls on, with results from Deere & Co. set for Friday.Euro-area PMI and inflation data are also due Friday.Group of 20 finance ministers and central bank chiefs are due to meet Feb. 22-23 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and are expected to discuss efforts to support growth amid the coronavirus threat.These are the main moves in markets:StocksThe S&P 500 Index fell 0.4% at the close of trading in New York.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index fell 0.9%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index sank 0.7%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index jumped 0.5%.The euro slipped 0.2% to $1.0787.The Japanese yen weakened 0.6% to 112.08 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries sank five basis points to 1.52%.Germany’s 10-year yield declined three basis points to -0.45%.Britain’s 10-year yield dipped two basis points to 0.57%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude gained 0.9% to $53.78 a barrel.Gold strengthened 0.5% to $1,619.80 an ounce.\--With assistance from Cormac Mullen, Adam Haigh, Todd White and Yakob Peterseil.To contact the reporters on this story: Vildana Hajric in New York at vhajric1@bloomberg.net;Claire Ballentine in New York at cballentine@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Brendan WalshFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • ViacomCBS’s Parts Might Add Up to a Greater Whole
    Bloomberg

    ViacomCBS’s Parts Might Add Up to a Greater Whole

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- “House of Brands” probably wasn’t the best choice of words by ViacomCBS Inc. in describing its streaming-TV strategy. It’s best for a company in its position to avoid what sounds eerily similar to another phrase — one that implies a shaky structure doomed to collapse. It’s also best not to remind people of the name of a hit series created by Netflix Inc., the very symbol of the end of times for cable networks like those owned by ViacomCBS. But the company may be on to something. Its house — er, collection — of TV and film brands were slapped together, just like its name, through the December merger of Viacom and CBS. Together, they have the potential to constitute an attractive streaming-TV offering for consumers different from existing ones. That means there’s at least hope for ViacomCBS, and that’s truly all investors and employees could reasonably expect right now. On Thursday, ViacomCBS posted unflattering results for its first quarter as a unified company, and its shares plunged 18%. It’s a reflection of the difficulty of stitching together two businesses with much different cultures — a challenge for any chief executive officer, but one that’s exacerbated in this case by the historical tensions between the two sides and the industry streaming wars that have threatened to make both of them irrelevant. Analysts predicted at least $7 billion of revenue for the period ended Dec. 31, but ViacomCBS took in only $6.87 billion amid a drop in traditional TV viewers, lower political advertising spending and a weak box-office showing. The merger closed on Dec. 5.But there were slivers of good news. Among them was the company’s announcement that it’s creating a new subscription-video service that will expand on the $6-a-month CBS All Access app ($10 for the commercial-free version) by stuffing it with more content from other parts of the empire. The company referred to it as a “House of Brands” product, the idea being that it can bring together its various entertainment, news, sports and film properties to reach a wider audience. The company’s biggest assets are CBS, MTV, Nickelodeon, BET, Comedy Central, Paramount Pictures and Showtime. It also owns Pluto TV, the advertising-supported service for consumers who want to stream for free, while Showtime targets the higher-end of the market with an $11-a-month online subscription.The strategy sounds a bit like the approach Comcast Corp.’s NBCUniversal is taking with its Peacock product, which is set to launch in April. Peacock will have a diverse library — everything from “Parks and Recreation” to “Jurassic Park” plus new shows — that most people will be able to access for free, with the option of paying $10 a month to cut out the ads. In contrast, Disney+, the fast-growing streaming service from Walt Disney Co., has more narrow appeal as it’s predominantly geared toward children and Marvel and “Star Wars” superfans; it has also shunned advertisers (for now). Peacock mimics the breadth of Netflix, whereas Disney+ looks more like a niche add-on option for Netflixers. A tremendous challenge for all the media giants, but especially ViacomCBS, is deciding where to put their content. ViacomCBS needs to continue to nourish its cable networks, the biggest moneymakers, while choosing which titles to save for CBS All Access to drive subscriber growth and which to sell to rival streaming services that are willing to pay for them. For example, the Paramount division previously produced the popular — and controversial — series “13 Reasons Why” for Netflix, a show that could have also appealed to MTV’s audience and potentially would have been a good fit for the expansion of CBS All Access. In that sense, it’s as if the different units within ViacomCBS are competing with one another. For once, though, Viacom and CBS are working under one clear leader, which is probably the biggest positive development following years of infighting and drama at both entities, both controlled by the Redstone family. Bob Bakish, Viacom’s well-liked, hard-nosed CEO of the last three years, is now in charge of the merged company, while Joe Ianniello, who had been Leslie Moonves’s No. 2 at CBS, is leaving next month. Moonves was ousted in September 2018 after a slew of sexual-harassment allegations came to light, ultimately paving the way for the merger of CBS and Viacom. Ianniello, though instrumental in getting the deal done — if only for the outrageous pay package used to placate him — was a symbol of the old regime and a possible wrench in Bakish’s salvage plan.Bakish has a lot of work to do, and fast. But his idea isn’t a bad one.  To contact the author of this story: Tara Lachapelle at tlachapelle@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Investopedia

    Investors Walking Away From ViacomCBS Stock

    ViacomCBS has attracted little or no buying interest since the December merger despite Wall Street happy talk.

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  • Hate TV Ads? Peacock May Change Your Mind
    Bloomberg

    Hate TV Ads? Peacock May Change Your Mind

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Comcast Corp.’s soon-to-launch Peacock service shows that advertising is the future of streaming TV. Consumers may be OK with that. On Thursday, the cable giant’s NBCUniversal entertainment division showcased Peacock to investors ahead of the app’s soft launch slated for April 15. Like Netflix, Disney+ and HBO Max (and to some extent, the content-lite Apple TV+), Peacock offers a library of movies; older and current network TV shows, such as “The Office” and “This Is Us”; and original programming made exclusively for its streaming audience. But it differs from the other services in one significant way: Peacock’s primary source of revenue will be ads, not subscriptions, allowing viewers the option of streaming for free. Let’s face it, paying for individual streaming-video apps at $7, $13 and $15 a pop isn’t all that cord-cutting was cracked up to be. The streaming-TV subscription model is brand new and broken. One app isn’t enough, yet having multiple subscriptions can get so expensive customers are left to wonder why they even got rid of cable. The streaming wars haven’t been a delight for the entertainment giants and their shareholders, either: These new apps are extremely costly to build and to stock with content, and they’ll cannibalize the larger revenue streams generated by traditional TV networks. Put it this way: TV just seems to work better for everyone when the consumer is the product, able to be sized up by advertisers desperate for a few moments of our time in hopes of activating a shopping reflex.Anecdotally, it’s said that viewers can’t stand ads. But in fact, research has shown that the No. 1 gripe for video subscribers is how much they’re paying. In a survey of about 6,000 North Americans conducted for TiVo Corp. toward the end of last year, about 70% said their reason for cutting the cord was that pay TV was too expensive. A separate survey by Ampere Analysis Ltd. similarly found price to be by far the biggest motivator for consumers switching to ad-supported apps, and 39% said they don't mind seeing ads while they watch. “We continue to believe consumers do not hate ads,” Rich Greenfield, an analyst for LightShed Partners, wrote in a report this week. “They hate heavy ad loads of un-targeted, repetitive ads in contrast to Instagram where the ads feel more like content.” Peacock is promising just five minutes of ads per hour.Media companies developing streaming services shouldn't underestimate the power of “free,” my colleague Sarah Halzack and I wrote last year in a column highlighting the appeal of ad-supported streaming offerings, such as Tubi, The Roku Channel and Pluto TV, which is now owned by ViacomCBS Inc. But compared to the quality of those apps, Peacock doesn’t feel free — it has plenty of premium content, carefully thought-out navigation and features, and with the option to watch some programming live and other stuff on-demand. A fuller content library can be accessed with Peacock Premium for $5 a month, although Comcast subscribers — even those who only have internet service — can get that version at no extra cost. For $10 a month, Peacock can be ad-free. But Comcast is probably hoping everyone will opt for the ads. About 70% of Hulu’s subscribers are on its ad-supported version, Peter Naylor, who heads up advertising sales for Hulu, said at a conference last year. And according to LightShed’s Greenfield, Hulu makes more money from its ad-supported version than from its ad-free subscriptions.For Comcast, it’s about “light advertising and bundling,” Jeff Shell, the newly installed CEO of the NBCUniversal unit, said during Thursday’s presentation. It’s one of the first signs of ”the great re-bundling” that I wrote about in November, as media giants realize they need to do something about the big consumer pain point of streaming: too many subscriptions.Comcast predicts Peacock will have at least 30 million active accounts and $2.5 billion of revenue by 2024, and that Ebitda will break even by then. Walt Disney Co. estimates Disney+ will turn profitable that same year, but it will take at least twice as many subscribers paying about $7 a month to do so. Similarly, AT&T Inc. is forecasting HBO Max won’t start making money until 2025, even though its fee is $15 a month. Meanwhile, Netflix has insisted it won’t adopt ads, despite the company’s $19 billion of content obligations as it burns through billions of dollars of cash each year.Of course, if ads are the name of the game, the industry has work to do to make them less annoying. Hulu, which is controlled by Disney, has been on the forefront of trying new advertising methods that are less interruptive than traditional commercials. It rolled out “pause ads” last year, which promote a brand’s product on screen while a video is paused.Comcast may be the only media giant to fully embrace ads so far for its streaming debut, but others will probably transition to a model more like Peacock’s over time. After all, birds of a feather flock together.To contact the author of this story: Tara Lachapelle at tlachapelle@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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    It would be 'super helpful if Netflix was willing to sell itself': analyst

    Needham and Co analyst Laura Martin said rising competition from Disney+ and Apple could cause the streaming giant to lose 4 million U.S. subscribers in 2020.