I:VIX Sep 2020 29.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
1.1000
0.0000 (0.00%)
At close: 11:51AM EST
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Previous Close1.1000
Open1.1000
Bid0.9000
Ask1.3000
Strike29.00
Expire Date2020-09-16
Day's Range1.1000 - 1.1000
Contract RangeN/A
Volume50
Open Interest164
  • Expert: Wall Street has a fire sale and no one shows up
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Expert: Wall Street has a fire sale and no one shows up

    Stocks are on pace for their worst week since the 2008 financial crisis. Thomas Hayes, Great Hill Capital Chairman joins Dan North, Euler Hermes' Chief Economist and Yahoo Finance's Seana Smith on The Ticker to discuss.

  • Options markets point to a potential bounce for U.S. stocks
    Reuters

    Options markets point to a potential bounce for U.S. stocks

    Activity in stock options points to a possible rebound for battered U.S. equities, after markets notched their steepest weekly drop since the financial crisis as the coronavirus outbreak accelerated beyond China's borders. The rapid rise in market volatility has lifted the price of short term futures on the Cboe Volatility Index above longer term ones - an event that has historically been followed by a 7% median gain for the benchmark S&P 500 within 30 days, according to research from market analytics firm Arbor Data Science. The S&P 500 fell 11.5% on the week.

  • Stock market’s ‘fear index’ may have just flashed a buy signal
    MarketWatch

    Stock market’s ‘fear index’ may have just flashed a buy signal

    Did the VIX just flash a contrarian buy signal? This is illustrated in the chart below, which reflects what I found upon dividing all days since 2000 into two equal-sized groups: The first contained all days in which the VIX was below its median, and the second contained the 50% of days with above-median readings.

  • Barrons.com

    Fear Has Overtaken This Market. How to Use It to Turn a Profit.

    Investors can selling downside put options on blue-chip stocks that they can hold for at least a few years. But there’s another trade worth considering—one that is still under the radar.

  • Markets Are in Crisis, Not the Financial System
    Bloomberg

    Markets Are in Crisis, Not the Financial System

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Financial-market volatility is painful. From mom-and-pop investors suddenly seeing red in their 401(k) plans to large institutions scrambling to hedge their gigantic portfolios, this past week has been record-setting in any number of ways. The one example that’s bound to be repeated often: The S&P 500 Index plunged the most since 2008. Minds tend to wander in the same direction when hearing that particular year. So let me just say this right now: There’s virtually no evidence that the world is veering toward another financial crisis. The rapid decline in Treasury yields and the fastest correction ever in stocks is, at least as of now, purely a market-driven phenomenon. That’s bound to strain some mutual funds, no question. Maybe some hedge funds, too. But it’s hardly apocalyptic. Here are just a couple of examples of scary charts that truly don’t reflect anything about the health of the financial system; rather, they are just another way of measuring the quick sell-off in equity markets.First there’s the often-cited market “fear gauge,” the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX). It jumped to as high as 49.48 on Friday, the highest level since the so-called Volmageddon episode in early 2018. Then there’s the fact that the Bloomberg U.S. Financial Conditions Index has been absolutely crushed in recent days and reached its lowest level since early 2016. But the inputs to this index are largely market-based, like the levels of the S&P 500 and the VIX, as well as yield spreads between Treasuries and corporate bonds rated triple-B and below investment grade, which have both widened significantly.So what sorts of metrics are worth watching to determine whether a banking crisis is unfolding beneath the market chaos? Some traders look to the London interbank offered rate and other money-market benchmarks. There, the three-month Libor plunged 11.8 basis points on Friday to 1.46275%, the steepest one-day drop since December 2008. This isn’t what you would expect to see if financial institutions were facing any sort of turmoil, given that it’s the rate at which large global banks lend to one another. The drop merely reflects expectations of significant central-bank easing in the near future. A spread known as FRA/OIS, which measures market expectations for the gap between Libor and the Overnight Index Swap Rate, are rising a bit but still remain comfortably below levels seen in each of the past two years and certainly nowhere near the levels of the crisis.Then, of course, there’s the Federal Reserve. There’s a lot of frustration that policy makers haven’t yet indicated that interest-rate cuts are imminent. “I wouldn’t want to prejudge the March meeting,” St. Louis Fed President James Bullard said on Friday, mimicking comments earlier this week from other policy makers. “We are going to want to monitor events right up until the meeting.” This could be contributing to the market’s angst.Fed Chair Jerome Powell attempted to quell that concern with a somewhat rare statement on Friday afternoon: “The fundamentals of the U.S. economy remain strong. However, the coronavirus poses evolving risks to economic activity. The Federal Reserve is closely monitoring developments and their implications for the economic outlook. We will use our tools and act as appropriate to support the economy.” Those 44 words didn’t have much immediate impact.Still, few can dispute that the central bank has made significant strides to insulate the banking system from market stress. The Fed’s balance sheet expanded rapidly in the final months of 2019, which, somewhat ironically, had been cited by some investors as the reason behind the surge in equity prices. Stocks may be tumbling, but reserves at the Fed sure aren’t: They reached $4.18 trillion earlier this month, up from $3.76 trillion at the end of August. Expanding out to include the European Central Bank, the Bank of Japan and the Bank of England, their balance sheets as a percentage of gross domestic product remains close to a record. It’s an open question whether that’s a good thing for the health of their respective economies, but it makes it easier for the banking sector to withstand a severe slowdown.That’s not to say financial system is impenetrable. September’s repo meltdown served as a stark reminder of what can happen when critical market plumbing stops working. The Fed was able to step in, though, and it’s mostly functioning normally now.There’s still room for improvement. That’s why it was such a big deal this week that JPMorgan Chase & Co. said it plans to borrow funds through the Fed’s emergency lending facility from time to time this year in an exercise designed to break the stigma attached to it. The discount window is intended to provide emergency liquidity to banks that otherwise have healthy balance sheets. Randal Quarles, the Fed’s vice chairman for banking supervision, has said better access to the window would reduce demand for excess reserves at the Fed which in turn would enhance liquidity in repo and other money markets.I have written before about how the financial crisis caused a fundamental shift in who shoulders market risk now. Instead of Wall Street banks holding troves of corporate bonds and other risky assets, and stepping in when the markets are chaotic, they’ve tended to reduce their inventories over the past decade. That means asset managers, which are far less essential to the underpinnings of the global economy, will be increasingly on their own when losses start to mount. That’s a healthy development.As Bloomberg News’s Sebastian Boyd put it, in 2008 “reasonable minds could wonder out loud whether we were watching the death throes of global capitalism.” You wouldn’t be rational saying that today. Investors are witnessing the outbreak of a virus that governments around the globe are struggling to contain, which in turn has caused pockets of the global economy to grind to a standstill. Germany is quarantining 1,000 people. Switzerland is banning large events, including the Geneva car show. Milan looked like a ghost town. In such an environment, is it any wonder that the share prices of global companies have repriced, or that sovereign debt markets are bracing for a severe hit to growth?The coronavirus has infected markets, the economy and the habits of people worldwide. But if it’s any consolation, the financial system is proving so far to be immune.(Adds comments by Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell in the ninth paragraph. )To contact the author of this story: Brian Chappatta at bchappatta1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brian Chappatta is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering debt markets. He previously covered bonds for Bloomberg News. He is also a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • IPO Edge Editor Jannarone: What Short Sellers Have to Fear in Coronavirus Rout – Cheddar TV
    IPO-Edge.com

    IPO Edge Editor Jannarone: What Short Sellers Have to Fear in Coronavirus Rout – Cheddar TV

    Short sellers on Wall Street are aware of a single risk that could spoil their party: A surprise rate cut or even liquidity injection from the Federal Reserve. That's according to IPO Edge Editor-in-Chief John Jannarone, who joined Cheddar TV live at the closing bell late Thursday as the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial […]

  • Barrons.com

    Stocks’ Quick Fall Pushes ‘Fear Gauge’ to Highest Level Since Financial Crisis

    Stocks have plunged, falling for seven trading sessions in a row, but one market indicator is taking off

  • Stocks Are Free-Falling - Will This Area Act as Support?
    TheStreet.com

    Stocks Are Free-Falling - Will This Area Act as Support?

    Investors don't have it easy right now with the S&P; 500 down more than 15% in just a few trading sessions. Here are some must-know levels to watch.

  • Benzinga

    Airline, Hotel, Casino Stocks Likely To Be In Focus As Coronavirus Worries Continue

    What the market has been doing this week is repricing where it thinks earnings should be in light of the hit to global economic growth that is expected from the coronavirus. Meanwhile, Best Buy Co (NYSE: BBY) had nice earnings, but the stock couldn’t capitalize.

  • Wall Street Weekahead: Main Street leans toward Sanders, but Wall Street says Trump
    Reuters

    Wall Street Weekahead: Main Street leans toward Sanders, but Wall Street says Trump

    Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders may be surging in the polls ahead of Super Tuesday, but some on Wall Street have made their own conclusions on what November will bring: four more years of President Donald Trump. Ninety-five percent of participants in a Deutsche Bank survey of investors, economists and other market participants released earlier this month said Trump, a Republican, was either "extremely likely" or "slightly likely" to win the general election. The latest Reuters/Ipsos poll, conducted Feb. 19-25, showed Sanders with a seven percentage-point lead over Trump in a hypothetical general election matchup.

  • Barrons.com

    The Dow Fell 1,191 Points in a Historic Plunge Because of Covid-19

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average now sits in correction territory after plunging with its greatest one-day point drop in history.

  • The coronavirus is a serious concern but the stock market’s selloff is not
    MarketWatch

    The coronavirus is a serious concern but the stock market’s selloff is not

    HOWARD GOLD'S NO-NONSENSE INVESTING The coronavirus was first identified in early January in China, but investors in U.S. stocks paid it little mind. Just last week, both the S&P 500 (SPX)  and the Nasdaq Composite (COMP) hit all-time highs, a feat the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) had achieved the week before.

  • ETFs to Invest in as Coronavirus Fears Accelerate
    Zacks

    ETFs to Invest in as Coronavirus Fears Accelerate

    We have highlighted some ETFs that could benefit investors' portfolio in the near term

  • Volatility ETFs Jump as COVID-19 Spreads
    Zacks

    Volatility ETFs Jump as COVID-19 Spreads

    The spike in number of COVID-19 cases has renewed fears that the outbreak would turn into a pandemic resulting in market volatility.

  • Stock Market News for Feb 25, 2020
    Zacks

    Stock Market News for Feb 25, 2020

    Wall Street routed on Monday following the severity of coronavirus outbreak across the globe.

  • Major Indices set to wrap up worst week since financial crisis
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Major Indices set to wrap up worst week since financial crisis

    Tom Essaye, founder of The Sevens Report, and Stephen Guilfoyle of Sarge 986 LLC joins Yahoo Finance’s Alexis Christoforous, Brian Sozzi and Julie Hyman to discuss the latest market action on The First Trade.

  • Top ETFs to hedge against market volatility
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Top ETFs to hedge against market volatility

    Investors looking for safe assets amid a volatile market driven by coronavirus fears. Morningstar Global ETF's Ben Johnson says these ETF picks could help hedge your portfolio. He joins Yahoo Finance's Seana Smith on The Ticker.

  • Major indexes try to mount comeback after coronavirus worries markets
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Major indexes try to mount comeback after coronavirus worries markets

    Gibbs Wealth Management President & CIO Erin Gibbs and Brigg Macadam Founding Partner Greg Swenson join Yahoo Finance’s Alexis Christoforous, Brian Sozzi and Jared Blikre to discuss the latest trends in market action on The First Trade.

  • Federal Reserve comments on the impact of the coronavirus
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Federal Reserve comments on the impact of the coronavirus

    Fears over the coronavirus and its impact have wipe $1.7 trillion in U.S. stock market value in 2 days, leaving the Federal Reserve to publicly comment on the virus. Yahoo Finance’s Brian Cheung joins Alexis Christoforus to discuss the details on The First Trade.

  • Market Recap: Tuesday, February 25
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Market Recap: Tuesday, February 25

    All three major indexes closed in the after Tuesday's trading session, continuing their steep declines after Monday's thousand-point plunge. The Final Round panel discusses the latest market action, and how the coronavirus outbreak could continue to affect markets.

  • Stocks sink as CDC warns of likely coronavirus outbreak in United States
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Stocks sink as CDC warns of likely coronavirus outbreak in United States

    Martin Currie Head of Investment Strategy Kim Catechis joins Yahoo Finance’s Seana Smith to discuss the market reaction as stocks plunge for a second day in a row amid renewed coronavirus concerns on The Ticker.

  • Moderna soars on vaccine progress for coronavirus
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Moderna soars on vaccine progress for coronavirus

    Confirmed cases of the coronavirus are toppling 80,000 worldwide, as the FDA has identified 20 drugs that are at risk of a shortage due to the outbreak. Yahoo Finance’s Anjalee Khemlani joins Seana Smith to discuss the details on The Ticker.