VOD Jan 2021 20.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
1.6500
-0.2500 (-13.16%)
As of 2:09PM EST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close1.9000
Open1.6500
Bid1.5700
Ask1.8400
Strike20.00
Expire Date2021-01-15
Day's Range1.6500 - 1.6500
Contract RangeN/A
Volume8
Open Interest2.93k
  • UK's BT, Vodafone may seek PM Johnson's support for Huawei: sources
    Reuters

    UK's BT, Vodafone may seek PM Johnson's support for Huawei: sources

    Britain's BT and Vodafone are considering urging Prime Minister Boris Johnson not to risk the rollout of next generation mobile networks by banning China's Huawei [HWT.UL], sources said, confirming a Sky News report on Friday. Britain is set to take a final decision on Huawei's role in building new 5G networks this month. U.S. government officials have pushed for a total ban on Huawei on security grounds, and reports said they presented new evidence on Monday about the risks of using the Chinese company's equipment, branding it "madness".

  • Franklin Cuts Vodafone Idea’s Debt Value to Zero on Court Snub
    Bloomberg

    Franklin Cuts Vodafone Idea’s Debt Value to Zero on Court Snub

    (Bloomberg) -- Franklin Templeton Asset Management (India) Pvt. marked down its debt exposure to Vodafone Group Plc’s India venture to zero, concerned by the operator having to pay $4 billion in back-fees as early as next week. The carrier’s shares suffered a record plunge.The payment deadline has led to “significant uncertainty with respect to our exposure” to the carrier, the fund house said in a statement on Friday. Shares of Vodafone Idea tumbled as much as 39%, reflecting concerns over the future of the beleaguered company.Local wireless operators including Vodafone Idea Ltd. and Bharti Airtel Ltd. suffered a blow Thursday, when the Supreme Court rejected their appeal against an October verdict requiring them to pay as much as $13 billion for spectrum and license fees. The companies were counting on some relief, such as a reversal of the earlier order, reduced liabilities or staggered payment.The court’s rebuff adds to the woes of India’s debt funds hit by a lingering shadow banking crisis that’s shaken the nation’s credit markets in the past 18 months. The order also puts a severe burden on the survivors of a tariff war sparked by the 2016 entry of billionaire Mukesh Ambani’s Reliance Jio Infocomm Ltd., an upstart that disrupted the industry with free calls and cheap data.Both Bharti Airtel and Vodafone Idea, with a combined net debt of about $30 billion, reported record losses in the September quarter.Vodafone CEO Says India Venture Is at Risk of Collapse“Experience in India suggests it is unwise to talk of uncertainties, but it is very hard to see how Vodafone Idea survives,” analysts at New Street Research LLP wrote in a report. “A 2-player outcome would therefore be by far the most likely outcome,” which is positive for Bharti, they said.While Bharti Airtel, run by tycoon Sunil Mittal, has managed to raise the $3 billion it needs to pay from a sale of shares and convertible bonds, Vodafone Idea’s billionaire Chairman Kumar Mangalam Birla has warned that the company may have to cease operations and file for insolvency if the government doesn’t ease their burden.Vodafone Group, the British carrier that owns 45% of the venture, wrote off the carrying value of its shares in Vodafone Idea in its earnings for the half-year through September after analysts flagged the possibility of further impairments.India is open to discussing ways to help ease the payment of these dues by wireless carriers, according to a government official with knowledge of the matter. Stripping out interest from the dues or paying the amount in tranches are some ideas that the government can discuss, this official said.Shares of Bharti Airtel climbed 5.5% at close on Friday in Mumbai after the court order raised the prospects of a telecom duopoly in India. The company’s perpetual, dollar-denominated bonds declined the most in more than two months.Not EasyThe court on Thursday also rejected requests by telecom companies for rehearing the petition seeking relaxations on penalties sought by the government and deadline for the payment.“We wonder how weaker operators like Vodafone Idea will make this payment, and not that Bharti Airtel is getting any respite as the amount has to be paid up,” said Gaurang Shah, vice president at Geojit Financial Services Ltd. “It isn’t easy to raise tariffs and retain customers. It remains to be seen how companies now respond to this decision because the court has twice spelled it out for them.”For two decades, the operators had challenged the way authorities calculated their annual adjusted gross revenue, a share of which is paid as license and spectrum fees. With the October ruling, the court upheld the government’s method, while rejecting the companies’ plea to exclude revenue from non-telecommunications businesses.“We are evaluating filing a curative petition,” Airtel said in a statement after the ruling, an option echoed by Vodafone Idea as well. “The industry continues to face severe financial stress and the outcome could further erode the viability of the sector as a whole.”The government had raised a total demand of around 920 billion rupees ($13 billion) against all telecom operators, including defunct ones, according to filings in the court.Here’s a list of companies and the amount they have to pay to the government:Last year, Vodafone Idea had raised 250 billion rupees from a rights issue.“Vodafone may have some cash through rights issue but it won’t be enough to meet the overall dues,” said Rajiv Sharma, an analyst at Sbicap Securities. “If there’s not enough relief, then it is going to be a matter of time before they shut down.”In the past decade, India has seen a consolidation in the telecommunications industry. Three non-state operators are left now, from about a dozen four years ago. While Vodafone’s local unit announced its merger with Birla’s Idea Cellular Ltd. in 2017, Aircel Ltd. and tycoon Anil Ambani’s Reliance Communications Ltd. slipped into bankruptcy last year. Others including Norway’s Telenor group and UAE’s Etisalat group exited the market.\--With assistance from P R Sanjai, Thomas Seal, Bijou George and Rahul Satija.To contact the reporter on this story: Upmanyu Trivedi in New Delhi at utrivedi2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Nagarajan at samnagarajan@bloomberg.net, ;Arijit Ghosh at aghosh@bloomberg.net, Bhuma Shrivastava, Ravil ShirodkarFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times

    Shares in Vodafone’s India venture plunge after court ruling

    Shares in Vodafone’s Indian joint venture plunged after the country’s Supreme Court upheld a ruling that telecoms companies must pay billions in retrospective licence and spectrum fees. requiring mobile operators to pay $13bn in historic levies. The shares recovered slightly to trade 26 per cent lower following a report that the company, in which the UK group holds a 45 per cent stake, may be able to approach India’s highest court for an extension to a January 23 deadline for it to pay about $7bn.

  • Bloomberg

    India’s Top Court Rules Phone Carriers Must Pay $13 Billion to Government

    (Bloomberg) -- Follow Bloomberg on Telegram for all the investment news and analysis you need.India’s Supreme Court ruled that wireless carriers including Bharti Airtel Ltd. and Vodafone Idea Ltd. need to pay $13 billion of dues to the government, rejecting an appeal by operators struggling to stem losses and reduce debt.A three-judge Supreme Court bench headed by Justice Arun Mishra on Thursday dismissed review petitions filed by the telecommunication companies against the October verdict, according to updates on the court’s website. Under that ruling, Vodafone Group Plc’s India venture has to pay $4 billion, while Bharti Airtel got a $3 billion bill -- all due on Jan. 24.The court also rejected requests by telecom companies for rehearing the petition seeking relaxations on penalties sought by the government and deadline for the payment.The court’s rebuff is the latest setback for the survivors of a brutal tariff war sparked by the 2016 entry of billionaire Mukesh Ambani’s Reliance Jio Infocomm Ltd., an upstart that disrupted the industry with free calls and cheap data. Both Bharti Airtel and Vodafone Idea, with a combined net debt of about $30 billion, reported record losses in the quarter through September, and were counting on the court to reverse its order.“We wonder how weaker operators like Vodafone Idea will make this payment, and not that Bharti Airtel is getting any respite as the amount has to be paid up,” said Gaurang Shah, vice president at Geojit Financial Services Ltd. “It isn’t easy to raise tariffs and retain customers. It remains to be seen how companies now respond to this decision because the court has twice spelled it out for them.”Eroding ViabilityFor two decades, the operators had challenged the way authorities calculated their annual adjusted gross revenue, a share of which is paid as license and spectrum fees. With the October ruling, the court upheld the government’s method, while rejecting the companies’ plea to exclude revenue from non-telecommunications businesses.“We are evaluating filing a curative petition,” Airtel said in a statement after the ruling. “The industry continues to face severe financial stress and the outcome could further erode the viability of the sector as a whole.”The government had raised a total demand of around 920 billion rupees ($13 billion) against all telecom operators, including defunct ones, according to filings in the court.Here’s a list of companies and the amount they have to pay to the government:Bharti Airtel recently raised $3 billion from sales of shares and convertible bonds to help meet the payment deadline. On the other hand, Vodafone Idea’s billionaire Chairman Kumar Mangalam Birla warned last month that the company would have to cease operations and head for insolvency if the government doesn’t provide relief measures.Last year, Vodafone Idea had raised 250 billion rupees from a rights issue.Vodafone’s India Unit Chairman Says End is Near If No Support“Vodafone may have some cash through rights issue but it won’t be enough to meet the overall dues,” said Rajiv Sharma, an analyst at Sbicap Securities. “If there’s not enough relief, then it is going to be a matter of time before they shut down.”In the past decade, India has seen a consolidation in the telecommunications industry. Three non-state operators are left now, from about a dozen four years ago. While Vodafone’s local unit announced its merger with Birla’s Idea Cellular Ltd. in 2017, Aircel Ltd. and tycoon Anil Ambani’s Reliance Communications Ltd. slipped into bankruptcy last year. Others including Norway’s Telenor group and UAE’s Etisalat group exited the market.(Updates with background throughout.)\--With assistance from P R Sanjai and Nupur Acharya.To contact the reporters on this story: Upmanyu Trivedi in New Delhi at utrivedi2@bloomberg.net;Ragini Saxena in Mumbai at rsaxena30@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Nagarajan at samnagarajan@bloomberg.net, ;Unni Krishnan at ukrishnan2@bloomberg.net, Bhuma ShrivastavaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 6 Stocks Trading With Low Price-Sales Ratios
    GuruFocus.com

    6 Stocks Trading With Low Price-Sales Ratios

    Vodafone makes the list Continue reading...

  • Vodafone Australian Unit Picks Nokia as 5G Network Vendor
    Zacks

    Vodafone Australian Unit Picks Nokia as 5G Network Vendor

    Vodafone's (VOD) Australian telco counterpart teams up with Nokia to supply 5G equipment and deploy seamless 5G technology across the country.

  • Benzinga

    Vodafone Hutchison Teams Up With Nokia To Start 5G Network In Australia

    The 50-50 joint venture of Vodafone Group Plc’s (NASDAQ: VOD) broadband services and Hutchison Telecommunications Hong Kong Holdings Ltd (OTC: HTHKY) will start its 5G network in Australia, with Nokia as the network vendor, said the companies on Monday. Vodafone Hutchison will use a Nokia-based network to start its 5G operations in Australia.

  • Vodafone Hutchison Australia partners with Nokia to kick off 5G rollout
    Reuters

    Vodafone Hutchison Australia partners with Nokia to kick off 5G rollout

    The 5G drive comes as the joint venture is caught in a legal appeal process against an antitrust regulator's move to block its proposed A$15 billion mega-merger with TPG Telecom Ltd . In a joint statement, the companies said Vodafone Hutchison Australia, the 50-50 joint venture, would kick off its 5G rollout in the first half of 2020 with Nokia as the network vendor.

  • Financial Advisors Put Facebook In Spotlight Amid Stock Upgrade, Cloud Gaming Rumors
    Insider Monkey

    Financial Advisors Put Facebook In Spotlight Amid Stock Upgrade, Cloud Gaming Rumors

    The US stock market managed to end yet another week well in the green territory as investors digested the Phase One US-China trade deal that is likely to be signed next month and shrugged off the impeachment of President Trump in the House of Representatives. Between December 16 and December 20, the S&P 500 gained […]

  • Is Vodafone Group Plc  (VOD) A Good Stock To Buy?
    Insider Monkey

    Is Vodafone Group Plc (VOD) A Good Stock To Buy?

    Does Vodafone Group Plc (NASDAQ:VOD) represent a good buying opportunity at the moment? Let’s quickly check the hedge fund interest towards the company. Hedge fund firms constantly search out bright intellectuals and highly-experienced employees and throw away millions of dollars on satellite photos and other research activities, so it is no wonder why they tend […]

  • Europe Edges Toward 5G Restrictions After Blast of U.S. Lobbying
    Bloomberg

    Europe Edges Toward 5G Restrictions After Blast of U.S. Lobbying

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. officials flooded Europe last week, and by the time they had departed, their efforts to persuade their allies to cut back in using Huawei Technologies Co. equipment appeared to finally be gaining traction.Europe has been caught between two major world powers, China and the U.S., over the question of whether to include Huawei in the roll-out of its future 5G mobile networks. Many European countries don’t want to anger Beijing, a significant trading partner, while the U.S., an important security ally, has repeatedly said it may reassess intelligence sharing with countries that utilize Huawei in their 5G networks.But on Tuesday the European Union agreed its member states should adopt a “comprehensive and risk-based” approach to the security of 5G, which includes using only trustworthy parties for components critical to national security, and should consider the laws of a supplier’s home country before buying their products.A day later, following a NATO summit U.S. President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel discussed “the need to exclude untrusted providers,” a White House spokesman said in a statement. The discussion came as the country’s largest phone carrier, Deutsche Telekom AG, announced it had stopped orders for 5G equipment due to Huawei’s uncertain status. Merkel has previously insisted that individual vendors such as Huawei should not be banned from the outset.While American diplomats see the new EU security conclusions as a sign of progress, it’s not yet certain it will lead to a change in Huawei’s status in Europe. Under current EU law, only member states can ban vendors from their markets. The countries are expected to agree to recommendations by the end of the year. These could include flagging specific vendors as untrustworthy, or suggesting updates to EU or national legislation.The ambiguities of European regulation haven’t stopped U.S. officials from declaring some form of victory.“We were very pleased to see the conclusions on 5G that the EU council released,” Rob Strayer, the U.S. State Department’s deputy assistant secretary for cyber, said on a conference call with reporters Thursday.Keith Krach, the State Department’s under secretary for economic growth, energy, and the environment also told reporters in Paris: “I would like to salute the EU leadership on the position they’ve taken on securing 5G.”For their part, EU officials said member states agreed to the 5G conclusions to safeguard the region’s own interests, not to appease any outside powers. They added that the U.S. and China weren’t mentioned in the discussions leading up to the agreement, nor were there any real controversial issues among the member states.Part of the U.S. optimism comes as European companies begin to turn their back on Huawei. Deutsche Telekom said it was hoping for “political clarity for the 5G build-out in Germany as soon as possible” as it announced it had stopped orders on 5G equipment due to Huawei’s uncertain status. No other major European telecommunications company has announced a full ban, although Vodafone Group Plc in January suspended purchases of Huawei gear for the core of its European networks.A key issue for European and U.S. officials is a 2017 Chinese law that mandates any organization and citizen to support and assist national intelligence in their investigations. The U.S. has argued that allies should only purchase equipment from countries that have independent court systems. Strayer has said he isn’t trying to get allies to ban a particular company, but instead, is urging allies to adopt a common security standard -- which Huawei doesn’t meet.“We’ve said for some time that we want to maintain our very close cooperation on law enforcement and military matters with governments around the world,” said Strayer said on Tuesday in an interview with Bloomberg TV. “But when we’re not able to share information securely, as would be the case when they have untrusted vendors in their 5G networks, we’re going to have to reassess how we share that information in the future.”A Huawei spokesman pointed Bloomberg News to a statement in which the company welcomed the EU’s “fact-based approach,” adding that the Chinese company is a trusted partner throughout Europe and that its 5G solution is “safe and innovative.”The political agreement by the European member states aims to set one approach on 5G across capitals, preventing any one country from being singled out or becoming a potential target for retaliation by China or the U.S.In the U.K., a key U.S. ally, Conservative party politicians are burnishing their hawkish security credentials during a general election campaign by dangling the prospect of a ban on a Chinese supplier. Prime Minister Boris Johnson, speaking at the NATO Summit in London on Wednesday, said he didn’t want Britain to be “unnecessarily hostile to investment from overseas,” but “we cannot prejudice our vital national security interests.”U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid appeared to echo Johnson’s stance. “When it comes to our national security, no cost is too high,” he said, speaking to LBC radio. The Conservatives are capitalizing on data that shows opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn polling badly on whether he can be trusted on national security issues.It wasn’t all a success for the U.S., however. The following day, Johnson was seen using what appeared to be a Huawei P20 smartphone to take selfies. His office said that the phone belonged to a staffer.\--With assistance from Kitty Donaldson and Rudy Ruitenberg.To contact the reporters on this story: Alyza Sebenius in Washington at asebenius@bloomberg.net;Natalia Drozdiak in Brussels at ndrozdiak1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Andrew MartinFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Vodafone to Introduce AWS Wavelength for 5G Cloud Computing
    Zacks

    Vodafone to Introduce AWS Wavelength for 5G Cloud Computing

    Boasting Europe's largest 5G network across 58 cities and as a global leader in IoT with more than 90 million connections, Vodafone (VOD) is the first telco to bring AWS Wavelength in the country.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Netherlands to raise at least 900 mln euros in first 5G auction

    The Netherlands aims to rake in at least 900 million euros ($992 million) from its first auction of bandwidth for 5G networks, it said on Thursday, adding some equipment suppliers could be banned from the new networks if they raise security concerns. European governments are grappling with how to treat Huawei Technologies Co Ltd after the United States alleged the Chinese telecoms supplier's equipment could be exploited by Beijing for spying. Huawei strongly denies the allegations.

  • Reuters

    Dutch government sets out plans for auctions of 5G bandwidth

    The Netherlands unveiled plans on Thursday to auction bandwidth for 5G networks, saying some telecoms suppliers could be banned if they had close ties to foreign governments or intelligence agencies involved in spying. Secretary of State Mona Keijzer said in a statement that the government's first auction of the 700, 1400, and 2100Mhz ranges would take place by June 30 with a floor of 900 million euros ($992 million). An auction of the 3.5Mhz range most commonly associated with 5G is being delayed as the Dutch government moves a ground satellite system that would interfere with it to a new location.

  • Cell C Creditors Hire Moelis, Lawyers to Push for Telkom Takeover
    Bloomberg

    Cell C Creditors Hire Moelis, Lawyers to Push for Telkom Takeover

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Next Africa newsletter and follow Bloomberg Africa on TwitterCell C Pty Ltd.’s creditors aren’t giving up on a takeover offer from rival Telkom SOC Ltd., which South Africa’s third-largest mobile-network operator rejected last week.Senior debt holders have hired investment-banking firm Moelis & Co. and corporate lawyers Linklaters LLP and DLA Piper LLP to lobby for the Telkom proposal, people familiar with the matter said. They could block Cell C from pursuing an alternative recapitalization plan by forcing the carrier into liquidation or business rescue, said the people, asking not to be identified because talks are ongoing.A takeover by Telkom would return about 86 cents on the rand to lenders, while banks may have to take a deeper haircut if Cell C goes ahead with a transaction involving local investment company Buffet Group, they said. Creditors are also requesting that Cell C’s board act independently from Blue Label Telecoms Ltd., which owns 45% of the company, the people said.“Cell C and its various stakeholders, including the creditors, are working collaboratively to conclude a restructure that addresses all parties interests,” Cell C said in an email. “It is important to respect the confidentiality of these discussions. Information circulating in the public domain about these discussions should be viewed with a degree of caution. Cell C confirms that constructive discussions on the recapitalization are underway and will update the market on all material matters in due course.”Linklaters, DLA Piper and Moelis & Co. declined to comment, while Buffet Group could not be reached. Telkom said it hasn’t had any further communication from Cell C’s side.It’s not the first time Cell C has spurned advances from Telkom, which wants to combine the country’s two smallest network operators to better compete against industry leaders MTN Group Ltd. and Vodacom Group Ltd. After running into financial difficulties in 2016, Cell C opted for a deal with Blue Label.In July, Cell C missed interest payments and suspended future obligations, resulting in S&P Global Ratings cutting Cell C’s assessment to default. The company, which generates about 15 billion rand ($1 billion) in revenue, is struggling to repay about 9 billion rand of debt.Cell C agreed on an extended roaming agreement with MTN last month that will give it access to the network of South Africa’s second-largest wireless carrier. As part of that pact, Cell C will pay as much as 5 billion rand a year in roaming charges, from about 1.8 billion rand, the people said. Lenders haven’t been given a chance to review the deal, they said.(Corrects description of Blue Label stake in third paragraph and adds updated statement from Cell C in fourth paragraph for story published on Dec. 2)To contact the reporter on this story: Loni Prinsloo in Johannesburg at lprinsloo3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, Vernon Wessels, John BowkerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Orange Joins Phone Industry’s Big Infrastructure Sell-Off
    Bloomberg

    Orange Joins Phone Industry’s Big Infrastructure Sell-Off

    (Bloomberg) -- Orange SA will seek to extract greater value from its telecom infrastructure, joining rivals in selling stakes in mobile-phone towers and fiber-optic networks.In a first step, France’s largest phone carrier is selling 1,500 mobile towers in Spain to Cellnex Telecom SA for 260 million euros ($288 million), it said Wednesday in a statement unveiling a five-year strategic plan.Orange will set up separate companies to house its 40,000 cellular towers and look for partners to help finance the costly roll-out of fiber networks in France and elsewhere in Europe.Its shares fell as much as 4.8%, the biggest intraday drop in more than three years, after the company issued new forecasts for profits and dividends in the near term that were weaker than analysts had expected. Orange Slides to Almost 3-Month Low as Investor Day DisappointsThe carrier is a relative latecomer to an industry push to hive off network infrastructure into separate businesses to boost its value and bring in new investors. There’s big demand for those assets among funds seeking reliable investment returns. Their involvement could help Orange to cut investment costs and boost a share price that’s barely changed in half a decade, frustrating the government, which owns almost a quarter of the company. The company’s new financial targets see capital spending starting to decline from 2022 once it’s made investments in radio-access network sharing deals in Spain and Belgium and completed the bulk of a fiber-to-the-home fixed-line deployment in France. Ecapex, Orange’s term for capital spending, is expected to grow by around 200 million euros in 2020, then stabilize in 2021 before starting to decline the following year.Read more: Orange’s Midterm Outlook Ambition Hindered by Pressures: ReactMaking the most of infrastructure is key to a new target to increase Ebitdaal -- its measure for adjusted operating income -- by 2% to 3% for 2021-2023. That’s after slightly increasing Ebitdaal in 2019 and aiming for “flat positive” Ebitdaal in 2020.The extra profit may not go to shareholders for now: the company set a minimum annual dividend of 70 euro cents until 2023 and said any increase would depend on the amount of organic cash flow.“We believe the short-term guidance is underwhelming versus consensus expectations,” said Barclays analysts in a note. “As such we expect some profit taking after the recent strong stock performance.”Orange stock has gained 1.5% this year through Tuesday, in line with the wider Stoxx Europe 600 telecommunications index, while independent wireless tower company Cellnex has doubled in value.Red LineFor now, Orange’s infrastructure plans are relatively limited compared to those of rivals. While Vodafone Group Plc has set up a separate towers business for which it plans an initial public offering or stake sale, Orange is looking on a market-by-market basis to consider selling non-strategic towers, and will hold on to what it sees as the most valuable sites. While the new tower companies in Europe seek to demonstrate infrastructure value, monetization so far is “very limited,” Jefferies analysts led by Jerry Dellis wrote in a note.Orange will only go so far in separating assets that it still sees as key to its future. Chief Executive Officer Stephane Richard said it is a “red line” for Orange to “keep control” of the infrastructure, while conceding that its share price doesn’t reflect the value of the assets under the current structure.U.S. carriers have been more radical than their European peers in the past decade, selling overall control of their towers to create a large, independent tower industry. Those deals sometimes led to higher costs for the carriers when the tower operators cranked up mast leasing costs.Orange said it will share future fiber broadband deployment in Spain and Poland with other carriers and may find partners for its French fiber rollout. Richard also raised the prospect of a possible IPO for Orange’s Africa and Middle East business, as previously reported by Bloomberg News. (Adds analyst comment in tenth paragraph, detail on fiber plans at end)\--With assistance from Kit Rees.To contact the reporter on this story: Angelina Rascouet in Paris at arascouet1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, Thomas Pfeiffer, Jennifer RyanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-France's Orange plans to set up European mobile mast company

    Orange said it planned to carve out its mobile towers in most European countries where it is present, in a move aimed at shoring up the telecom group's value as tough competition in the region has hampered its growth and margins. The French telecoms operator is following similar moves by other European companies that are looking at selling mobile networks as in valuations for infrastructure assets sky-rocket amid growing appetite from investors, such as U.S. private equity firm KKR and Spain's Cellnex. Bigger rivals Deutsche Telekom and Britain's Vodafone have separated their mast mobile assets and are seeking to sell part of them via a listing or a private sale.

  • MarketWatch

    Vodafone to collaborate with Amazon Web Services

    The U.K. telecommunications group said it will make AWS’s wavelength service available in Europe, to provide access to edge-computing capabilities to developers, Internet of Things, devices and end users.