VTIP - Vanguard Short-Term Infl-Prot Secs ETF

NasdaqGM - NasdaqGM Real Time Price. Currency in USD
48.76
+0.05 (+0.10%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close48.71
Open48.74
Bid47.83 x 1100
Ask49.76 x 1000
Day's Range48.72 - 48.76
52 Week Range48.52 - 49.66
Volume376,224
Avg. Volume413,525
Net Assets25.21B
NAV49.00
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
Yield1.51%
YTD Return0.45%
Beta (3y)0.28
Expense Ratio (net)0.06%
Inception Date2012-10-12
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Forbes4 days ago

    Best ETFs: TIPS

    Shutterstock These exchange-traded funds own Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities. After years of strenuous effort from the Federal Reserve, inflation is back. To cope, you could move some of your fixed-income money into funds that own inflation-protected bonds from the U.

  • FOMC: We Are Not Declaring a Victory on Inflation
    Market Realist10 days ago

    FOMC: We Are Not Declaring a Victory on Inflation

    The FOMC’s June statement was released on June 13, and the outlook for inflation remained upbeat. The highlight of the comments on inflation was the statement from FOMC Chair Jerome Powell, who said that he was not ready to declare victory on inflation. The statement indicated that on a 12-month basis, both inflation (CPI) and core inflation (which excludes food and energy) moved closer to the symmetric inflation (TIP) target, while the indicators of long-term inflation (VTIP) remained unchanged.

  • Why Has the FOMC Upgraded Its US GDP Forecast for 2018?
    Market Realist10 days ago

    Why Has the FOMC Upgraded Its US GDP Forecast for 2018?

    In its June FOMC meeting, the Federal Reserve increased the federal funds rate by 25 basis points and also released upgraded economic projections through its SEP (Summary of Economic Projections) report. Members’ projections for US economic growth, inflation (TIP), unemployment, and the federal funds rate are reported in the SEP report.

  • Why Does the Fed Expect Unemployment to Fall Further?
    Market Realist10 days ago

    Why Does the Fed Expect Unemployment to Fall Further?

    The US Federal Reserve has a dual mandate of achieving maximum employment and stable prices (TIP) in the economy. In recent months, the US unemployment rate has moved to multiyear lows, and it looks set to fall further, as there are more jobs available than the number of job seekers, according to the recent Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey. The strengthening of the job market was acknowledged in the June FOMC statement, and it remained the key reason for the Fed to comfortably tighten policy.

  • What the Fed Could Do after Inflation Breaches the 2% Mark
    Market Realist13 days ago

    What the Fed Could Do after Inflation Breaches the 2% Mark

    The Fed’s preferred inflation measure, the Personal Consumption Expenditures Price Index (or PCE), has remained below the 2.0% target for more than six years. The stubbornly low inflation (TIP) level has left the Fed members searching for reasons to explain the inability of inflation (VTIP) to tick higher, despite the increase in wages, low unemployment, and near-zero interest rates. Lower inflation growth was the primary reason that the Fed increased interest rates at a snail’s pace in 2015 and 2016, with only one rate hike per year.

  • InvestorPlace15 days ago

    How Income Investors Can Thwart Inflation with TIPS

    With interest rates on the rise, bond values, REITs and dividend-paying stocks have all been pressured lower as a means of adjusting for the prevailing interest rates of the day. It’s one reason why Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities, or TIPS for short is worth a look. Another reason is that, with the inflation outlook being largely uncertain there’s no end in sight to the frustration.

  • This Economic Data Point Decreased the Odds of a 4th Rate Hike
    Market Realist23 days ago

    This Economic Data Point Decreased the Odds of a 4th Rate Hike

    Personal consumption expenditure (or PCE), as defined by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (or BEA), is the value of the goods and services purchased by, or on behalf of, persons who reside in the United States. The Fed has a dual mandate of maintaining a low unemployment level and a steady price level in the economy. With US unemployment levels falling to a multi-decade low, inflation (VTIP) reaching 2.0% is the only unachieved target that is forcing the Fed to maintain an accommodative monetary policy.

  • Why the FOMC Isn’t Confident about Sustained Inflation Growth
    Market Realistlast month

    Why the FOMC Isn’t Confident about Sustained Inflation Growth

    The FOMC’s May meeting minutes indicated that some of its members had turned bearish on inflation (TIP). This information played a major role in changing investor’s assessment of the Fed’s plan for future rate hikes. If members feel that inflation can’t sustain above 2%, there’s the chance that they could limit the number of rate hikes going forward.

  • Key Takeaways from May’s FOMC Meeting Minutes
    Market Realistlast month

    Key Takeaways from May’s FOMC Meeting Minutes

    The most recent FOMC meeting was on May 1–2. The decision to leave the rate unchanged had been expected by the markets, but the FOMC used the meeting to announce a likely rate hike in June. FOMC meeting minutes are usually released three weeks after an FOMC meeting.

  • Could the US Dollar Slump Be Short Lived?
    Market Realistlast month

    Could the US Dollar Slump Be Short Lived?

    The US dollar depreciated against its major trading-partner currencies after the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on May 10 that US consumer prices grew 0.1% in April after falling 0.1% in March. The core consumer price index, which excludes volatile food and energy prices, rose 0.2%, marking a 2.1% year-over-year increase. The US dollar (UUP) fell after this report, as a slower rate of inflation (TIP) growth could mean a slower pace of rate hikes. In a developed economy, higher interest rates boost the currency. On May 10, the US dollar (USDU) index closed at 92.5. It appreciated by 0. ...

  • Bond Yields Fall after April Inflation Data Release
    Market Realistlast month

    Bond Yields Fall after April Inflation Data Release

    US bond market investors were relieved after the US Bureau of Labor Statistics’ April report, published May 10, indicated a lower-than-expected inflation growth rate. The latest inflation (VTIP) report indicated that core inflation increased at a slower pace of 0.1% in April, boosting hopes for a slower pace of rate hikes from the Fed. At its May meeting, the Fed stated that it would continue tightening and inflation (TDTT) would reach 2% in future months. The decline in bond yields after the disappointing jobs and inflation reports could be temporary, as inflation expectations may be fueled by higher crude prices.

  • Why Equity Markets Rose after April’s Inflation Report
    Market Realistlast month

    Why Equity Markets Rose after April’s Inflation Report

    US indexes (SPY) are reaching highs as investors ignore possible threats of the US pull-out from the Iran nuclear deal and focus on increasing crude prices. Markets have been driven higher by surging energy company stocks (XLE), which are expected to reap the benefits of higher crude oil prices. On May 10, the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ inflation (TIP) report gave investors another reason to pile on risk, with April inflation growth coming in below expectations, at 0.1%.

  • How April’s Inflation Data Relieved Markets
    Market Realistlast month

    How April’s Inflation Data Relieved Markets

    On May 10, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that US consumer prices rose 0.2% in April. In contrast, they fell 0.1% in March. The April growth kept the uptrend in inflation (TIP) growth intact. Over the last 12 months, US inflation has grown 2.5%, a steep increase from the 1.6% growth recorded in June 2017. Core inflation (VTIP), which excludes volatile food and energy prices, rose just 0.1%, the slowest growth since November 2017. Over the last 12 months, core inflation has grown 2.1%, above the 2% target rate set by the Fed.

  • Why US Job Openings Point to an Overheating Employment Market
    Market Realistlast month

    Why US Job Openings Point to an Overheating Employment Market

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (or BLS) released the “Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey” (or JOLTS) data for March on May 8. The BLS collects the data through a monthly survey of nearly 16,000 employers in the government, private (XLI), and non-farm sectors. The survey measures new employees hired, employees who have quit, employees who have been asked to leave, and other job separations.

  • Could there be a 4th Rate Hike in the Cards?
    Market Realist2 months ago

    Could there be a 4th Rate Hike in the Cards?

    The Bureau of Economic Analysis defines PCE (personal consumption expenditure) as the value of goods and services purchased by, or on behalf of, US residents. The Fed prefers this inflation (CPI) measure to assess price levels, as it reflects actual price increases for consumers.

  • Which Sector Posted Major Job Gains in April?
    Market Realist2 months ago

    Which Sector Posted Major Job Gains in April?

    The ADP March employment report was published on May 2. The report offered deeper insight into employment trends across different sectors in the US employment market. ADP and Moody’s Analytics prepared the monthly report.

  • Why 1Q18 Real GDP Estimate Raises Chance of 4th Rate Hike
    Market Realist2 months ago

    Why 1Q18 Real GDP Estimate Raises Chance of 4th Rate Hike

    The Bureau of Economic Analysis (or BEA) released its first estimate for 1Q18 real GDP on Friday. This reading was above the consensus estimate for a growth rate of 2% but below the 4Q17 real GDP growth rate of 2.9%. This positive surprise may have somewhat cemented the chances for three more rate hikes in 2018, and the Fed has no reason to back off from additional rate hikes this year.

  • Why Rising Inflation Failed to Raise Long-Term Yields
    Market Realist2 months ago

    Why Rising Inflation Failed to Raise Long-Term Yields

    The primary reason cited by the FOMC (Federal Open Market Committee) for holding off on interest rate hikes since 2016 was lagging inflation growth. Whenever the Fed signaled rate hikes, the yield curve flattened since investors were not convinced that inflation (TIP) growth would pick up the pace, which would limit the Fed’s ability to raise rates. The Fed has set a target of 2% inflation (VTIP) growth, at which point the economy is expected to be running at a normal pace.

  • What Makes the Yield Curve Turn Flat or Invert?
    Market Realist2 months ago

    What Makes the Yield Curve Turn Flat or Invert?

    It’s difficult to pinpoint a single reason for changes to the yield curve’s slope. First, any changes to the Fed’s interest rate immediately impact the yield curve at the short end, and the projections for long-term rates dictate the changes at the long end of the curve. For instance, the recent rate hike at the Fed’s March meeting had varying impacts on the US Treasury yield curve.

  • US Job Openings Still Near Highs
    Market Realist2 months ago

    US Job Openings Still Near Highs

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (or BLS) released the “Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey” (or JOLTS) data for February on April 13. The data for this survey is collected by a monthly survey on job openings, the number of new employees hired, the number of employees who have quit, the number of employees asked to leave, and other job separations. The JOLTS report is an indication of the demand for workers in the United States.

  • Why Bond Yields Weren’t Affected by the March Inflation Report
    Market Realist2 months ago

    Why Bond Yields Weren’t Affected by the March Inflation Report

    The most recent inflation (VTIP) report indicated that core inflation moved closer to the Fed’s 2% target, which could translate into further rate hikes from the central bank. At its recent meeting, the Fed clearly stated that it would continue tightening if supported by economic data. If interest rates and inflation (SCHP) start rising, bond (BND) yields could rise in response and bond prices could fall. US bond yields were largely unaffected by the inflation report favoring higher rates.

  • Why Rising Inflation Could Pose a Threat to Equity Markets
    Market Realist2 months ago

    Why Rising Inflation Could Pose a Threat to Equity Markets

    On April 11, market participants expected a volatile session after the US inflation report, but, to their surprise, Donald Trump’s tweet earlier in the day about Syria and missiles pushed markets lower. Had there not been any geopolitical tensions, the market reaction could have been negative despite the lower headline number. A faster pace of rate hikes from the Fed may have contributed to the market performance that day. The Fed has been increasing interest (SCHP) rates at a slower pace in the last two years despite employment picking up, citing low inflation as the reason for its slower pace.

  • Why March’s Inflation Numbers Could Pressure the Fed
    Market Realist2 months ago

    Why March’s Inflation Numbers Could Pressure the Fed

    The US Bureau of Labor Statistics has reported that US consumer prices fell 0.1% in March. The labor department reported that the consumer price index fell 0.1% in March after rising 0.2% in February. Though the headline inflation (TIP) was lower than expected, core inflation (VTIP), which excludes volatile food and energy prices, rose 0.2% in March, marking a YoY (year-over-year) increase of 2.1%, above the Fed’s 2% target. This increase in core inflation, following strong growth by the producer price index in March, could translate to higher inflation in the coming months.

  • 3 ETFs to Better Prepare for Aggressive Rate Hikes
    Zacks2 months ago

    3 ETFs to Better Prepare for Aggressive Rate Hikes

    U.S. Inflation increases at the fastest pace in a year, inducing fears of faster rate hikes.

  • FOMC Members Are More Confident about Inflation
    Market Realist2 months ago

    FOMC Members Are More Confident about Inflation

    The March FOMC meeting minutes indicated that the staff and FOMC members turned bullish on inflation. According to the minutes, all of the FOMC members expected the 12-month inflation (TIP) to increase in the coming months. The FOMC staff review indicated that PCE (personal consumption expenditures) inflation remained below the 2% target.