WFC - Wells Fargo & Company

NYSE - Nasdaq Real Time Price. Currency in USD
53.80
+0.31 (+0.58%)
At close: 4:03PM EST

53.80 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:27PM EST

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Previous Close53.49
Open53.78
Bid53.72 x 1200
Ask53.73 x 1100
Day's Range53.43 - 53.94
52 Week Range43.02 - 55.04
Volume10,768,243
Avg. Volume20,243,516
Market Cap228.393B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.10
PE Ratio (TTM)11.57
EPS (TTM)4.65
Earnings DateJan 14, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield2.04 (3.83%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-11-07
1y Target Est50.92
  • 5 Stocks Warren Buffett Is Selling (And 2 New Stakes)
    Kiplinger

    5 Stocks Warren Buffett Is Selling (And 2 New Stakes)

    Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B), oversaw a relatively quiet third quarter of buying and selling stocks. Berkshire made a new investment in the retail sector, pumped up its exposure to the oil patch and pared off a sliver of Apple (AAPL), among other moves. We know what the greatest long-term investor of all time has been doing because the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission requires all investment managers with more than $100 million in assets to file a Form 13F quarterly to disclose any changes in share ownership. These filings add an important level of transparency to the stock market and give Buffett-ologists a chance to get a bead on what he's thinking.When Buffett starts a new stake in some company, or adds to an existing one, investors take that as a vote of confidence. On the other hand, if he pares his holdings in a stock, it can spark investors to rethink their own investments.Here's the scorecard for what Berkshire Hathaway bought and sold during the three months ended Sept. 30, based on the most recent 13F that the company filed on Nov. 14. (And remember: Not all "Warren Buffett stocks" are actually his picks. Some smaller positions are believed to be handled by lieutenants Ted Weschler and Todd Combs.) SEE ALSO: Every Warren Buffett Stock Ranked: The Berkshire Hathaway Portfolio

  • Every Warren Buffett Stock Ranked: The Berkshire Hathaway Portfolio
    Kiplinger

    Every Warren Buffett Stock Ranked: The Berkshire Hathaway Portfolio

    The Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B) portfolio, most of which was selected by Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett, brings to mind ubiquitous blue-chip stocks such as American Express (AXP), Coca-Cola (KO) and, more recently, Apple (AAPL).But a deep dive into Berkshire Hathaway's equity holdings reveals a more complicated picture.Berkshire Hathaway held positions in 48 separate stocks as of Sept. 30, according to the most recent regulatory filing (Nov. 14) with the Securities and Exchange Commission - up from 47 during the second quarter of this year. But the portfolio of "Buffett stocks" isn't as diversified as the number might suggest. In some cases, BRK.B holds more than one share class in the same company. Also, some holdings are immaterial leftovers from earlier bets that the Oracle of Omaha has mostly exited, just not completely.In fact, Berkshire Hathaway's equity portfolio is actually pretty concentrated. The top six holdings account for almost 70% of the portfolio's total value. The top 10 positions comprise a little more than 80%. Banks and airlines, to cite a couple of industries, carry quite a load in this portfolio. Then there's the fact that several Buffett stocks were picked by portfolio managers Todd Combs and Ted Weschler.Here, we examine each and every holding to give investors a better understanding of the entire Berkshire Hathaway portfolio. SEE ALSO: 50 Top Stocks That Billionaires Love

  • Business Wire

    Wells Fargo & Company Declares Cash Dividends on Preferred Stock

    Wells Fargo & Company today announced dividends on 11 series of preferred stock.

  • Dodge & Cox Buys Encana, Acquires More Occidental
    GuruFocus.com

    Dodge & Cox Buys Encana, Acquires More Occidental

    A look at the mutual fund’s third-quarter portfolio updates Continue reading...

  • Benzinga

    Q3 13F Roundup: How Buffett, Einhorn, Ackman And Others Adjusted Their Portfolios

    The latest round of 13F filings from institutional investors is out, revealing to the world the stocks that some of the richest and most successful investors have been buying and selling. Takeaways From ...

  • EnLink's 20% Yield Is Everything Wrong With America's Pipelines
    Bloomberg

    EnLink's 20% Yield Is Everything Wrong With America's Pipelines

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- When a stock goes into free fall, one hope is that some acquirer out there will catch it. Sometimes, though, suitors come with their own complications. That brings us to EnLink Midstream LLC.EnLink operates gathering and processing pipelines and other oil and gas infrastructure across several onshore U.S. basins. In the summer of 2018, Devon Energy Corp., an exploration and production company, sold its stakes in various EnLink entities to Global Infrastructure Partners for just over $3.1 billion. After a subsequent simplification of EnLink, GIP owns 46% of the common units, now worth $1.2 billion.EnLink has been undone by weaker commodity prices. Earlier this month, Devon announced it had dropped the number of rigs operating in one of Oklahoma’s shale basins to precisely zero (how’s that for a coda to last year’s deal?). This confirmed a trend evident already in permitting and drilling data for the Anadarko basin, where just four companies account for the majority of activity; and, crucially, they have operations in other basins that are more competitive in terms of breakeven costs.The distribution yield on EnLink’s stock now scrapes 20% — on a par with the current yield on long-dated bonds of Chesapeake Energy Corp., which just issued a going-concern notice. There’s being paid to wait, as they say, and then there’s being paid to wait in that trash compactor from Star Wars.EnLink’s cash flow math is tight. Consensus forecasts — which have now had time to digest cost savings pledged on the latest earnings call — put Ebitda at $1.1 billion in 2020. Take off around $500-$550 million for cash interest and (much-reduced) capital expenditure, and that leaves about $550-$600 million versus current distributions of about $550 million. With Ebitda forecast to grow at just 1% a year through 2022, that tight squeeze won’t ease up. Wells Fargo & Co.’s analysts estimated in a recent report that, absent a change in distribution policy, current leverage of 4.2 times adjusted Ebitda could reach almost 6 times by 2025. By any rational measure, the distribution should be cut.The complicating issue is that EnLink’s leverage is compounded by more leverage at the GIP level in the form of a $1 billion term loan. Technically, it is separate from EnLink’s own finances. But as the company acknowledges in its own 10K filing, debt owed by an entity owning almost half the company plus its managing partner, and which is serviced by EnLink’s own distributions, is very much a risk factor. By my calculations, the loan requires roughly $80 million a year of EnLink distributions (GIP didn’t respond to requests for comment)(1). As of now, distributions amount to about $255 million. So, in theory, EnLink could slash its payout by about two-thirds and GIP could still service the loan.In practice, that would be a bitter pill to swallow. As it is, GIP’s common units in EnLink are now worth not much more than the value of the loan and way below the original investment. Cutting distributions would certainly help EnLink’s balance sheet; all else equal, a 67% cut would save enough cash to take leverage below 4 times adjusted Ebitda, in line with long-term targets. But this would almost certainly push the value of GIP’s stake even lower, at least in the near term. As Ethan Bellamy, analyst at Robert W. Baird & Co. Inc., put it to me:Does GIP leverage prevent EnLink from cutting the distribution and right sizing the ship? It wouldn’t be the first time we’ve seen parental leverage from a private equity sponsor lead to sub-optimal outcomes for the subsidiary public entity.On the other hand, if EnLink cuts and its price falls further, then GIP might be tempted to make an offer for the rest of the company in an effort to salvage things out of the public eye. Needless to say, a takeover premium on an even lower EnLink price would do very little to make up for the losses suffered to date. We are seeing this play out with Blackstone Group Inc.’s offer for another midstream company, Tallgrass Energy LP, although the pain there is compounded by an agreement between the buyer and Tallgrass’s executives that effectively shields the latter from losses (see this).EnLink captures so much of what has gone wrong in America’s pipelines business. There’s the misalignment of interest between ordinary investors and the sponsors steering the company’s destiny. There’s the exposure to commodity markets from which, in theory, midstream companies were supposed to be insulated. Above all, there’s the overcapitalization of this sector, with obligations piled onto assets (largely to fund outsize payouts to controlling sponsors) that ultimately couldn’t generate the profits to service them (largely because too much stuff got built).Almost exactly four years ago, Kinder Morgan Inc. presaged the midstream reckoning to come by slashing its dividend. The stock has been listless for much of the period since then; even with the cut, chipping away at debts in a post-boom environment is a laborious process. As this decade of nominal success for America’s shale boom draws to a close, EnLink’s predicament shows the hangover remains very much a work in progress.(1) This assumes the full $1 billion remains outstanding. Interest is charged at Libor plus 4.25%, equating to 6.15%, or about $62 million. A debt-service covenant ratio of 1.1 times takes this to $68 million. Mandatory annual amortization of 1% of the loan plus assumed G&A costs results in an estimated minimum requirement of about $80 million to service the debt. Details derived from Moody's Corp.'s initial rating report from July 2018.To contact the author of this story: Liam Denning at ldenning1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Gongloff at mgongloff1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Liam Denning is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering energy, mining and commodities. He previously was editor of the Wall Street Journal's Heard on the Street column and wrote for the Financial Times' Lex column. He was also an investment banker.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Warren Buffett's Berkshire Adds 2 Stocks to Portfolio in 3rd Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    Warren Buffett's Berkshire Adds 2 Stocks to Portfolio in 3rd Quarter

    Despite growing cash pile, portfolio managers did not increase any other positions Continue reading...

  • Bank Stock Roundup: Ambiguity Over Trade War Remains, SunTrust & Citi in Focus
    Zacks

    Bank Stock Roundup: Ambiguity Over Trade War Remains, SunTrust & Citi in Focus

    Banking stocks depreciate on uncertainty over trade conflict along with other global concerns.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walt Disney, Wells Fargo, Vale, Shopify and TELUS
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walt Disney, Wells Fargo, Vale, Shopify and TELUS

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Walt Disney, Wells Fargo, Vale, Shopify and TELUS

  • Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway takes stake in Bay Area retailer, trims Apple, Wells Fargo
    American City Business Journals

    Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway takes stake in Bay Area retailer, trims Apple, Wells Fargo

    Berkshire Hathaway disclosed Thursday that it bought a 1.2-million-share stake in luxury furniture retailer RH, formerly known as  Restoration Hardware, during the third quarter, sending the Corte Madera retailer’s shares up 7% in after-hours trading. Berkshire, led by legendary investor Warren Buffett, also trimmed his stakes in Apple and Wells Fargo. Buffett has been steadily selling some of Berkshire’s Wells Fargo shares to keep its stake under 10 percent for regulatory reasons as the bank buys back stock.

  • Bonds Aren’t Believers in a Synchronized Upswing
    Bloomberg

    Bonds Aren’t Believers in a Synchronized Upswing

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The global bond market rallied for a second consecutive day on Thursday in an awkward development for the growing chorus of voices that have cropped up the last few weeks contending that the synchronized global slowdown was over. From China to Germany, and from Cisco Systems Inc. to freight shipments, the latest data show  it’s too soon to turn optimistic.In China, industrial output rose 4.7% in October from a year earlier, below the median estimate of 5.4%. Germany did post a surprise expansion in its gross domestic product for the third quarter, but that came with plenty of caveats. For one, the increase was only 0.1%, and the contraction for the second quarter was deeper than initially reported — negative 0.2% versus negative 0.1%. In the U.S., economists were passing around the latest Cass Freight Index for October, which fell 5.9% to mark its 11th consecutive year-over-year decline. This gauge has been around since 1995 and tracks freight volumes and expenditures by hundreds of companies in North America conducting $28 billion of transactions annually. More important, the compilers of the index noted in the latest survey that the index “has gone from ‘warning of a potential slowdown’ to ‘signaling an economic contraction.’” Cisco is not in the freight business, but comments by Chief Executive Officer Chuck Robbins late Wednesday after the computer company released fiscal second-quarter results echoed the sentiment in the freight industry. “Just go around the world and you see what’s happening in Hong Kong, you look at China, what’s happening in D.C., you’ve got Brexit, uncertainty in Latin America,” he said on a conference call with investors and analysts. “Business confidence suffers when there’s a lack of clarity, and there’s been a lack of clarity for so long that it’s finally come into play.”Maybe the global economy isn’t worsening, but it’s too soon to say an upswing is underway. Despite the sell-off in the bond market since September, yields are still showing caution. Yields on bonds worldwide as measured by the Bloomberg Barclays Global Aggregate Index stand at 1.45%, which is closer to its all-time low of 1.07% in 2016 than last year’s high of 2.27% in November.AWASH IN MORE DEBTThe Institute of International Finance came out with its quarterly look at the mountain of global debt, concluding that it rose by about $7 trillion in the first half of the year to a record of just more than $250 trillion. That increase is more double the $3.3 trillion expansion for all of last year. It pegs global debt, which it sees expanding to $255 trillion by the end of the year, at a lofty 320% of global GDP. It’s no surprise that the world is awash in debt, but yields show there seems to be a dearth of it for the public because of massive purchases by central banks. As of October, the collective balance-sheet assets of the Federal Reserve, European Central Bank, Bank of Japan and Bank of England stood at 35.7% of their countries’ total GDP, up from about 10% in 2008. Still, this is no time to be complacent. The IIF points out that much of the growth in debt has come in emerging markets, which is generally considered riskier than that of developed economies and where central banks are not doing things like quantitative easing. This could become an issue relatively quickly; the IIF pointed out that $9.4 trillion of bonds and syndicated loans from emerging markets come due by the end of 2021.CORPORATE CASH SHRINKSThe latest doubts about the strength of the economy kept the S&P 500 Index little changed for a second consecutive day. Perhaps that’s for the better because falling interest rates and bond yields are perhaps the single-biggest reason equities are up 23.4% this year in the absence of earnings growth. The second is probably share repurchases. But a new report from Societe General SA raises concern that the cash companies use to fund those buybacks is being depleted. “A boon for U.S. share buybacks” has left companies with less cash in their coffers, Societe Generale strategists Sophie Huynh and Alain Bokobza wrote in a report. Cash and money-market investments held by companies in the S&P 500 peaked in 2018’s first quarter on a per-share basis before falling 5.3% through the third quarter of this year, according to Bloomberg News’s David Wilson. S&P 500 companies have bought back the equivalent of 22% of their market value since 2010, the Societe Generale strategists noted in their report.CHILEAN CRISIS ENTERS NEW PHASEThe chaos in Chile, long known as the safest bet in Latin America, has become so bad that not even direct intervention by the nation’s central bank was able to reverse the slide in the peso. The currency fell about 1% Thursday, bringing its slide to 11.4% since mid-October. That’s the worst of the 31 major currencies tracked by Bloomberg and more than five times the next biggest loser, the Hungarian forint. What should have investors worried is that the peso depreciated even after the central bank announced a $4 billion currency swap program to ease liquidity in the market amid the worst civil unrest in a generation. “I don’t think it will help stop the sell-off in any way,” Brendan McKenna, a currency strategist at Wells Fargo, told Bloomberg News in reference to the swaps program. “There has to be some breakthrough on the political front for the currency to stabilize.” Foreign investors have been especially rattled since the government said Sunday that it backed plans to rewrite the constitution in response to four weeks of riots and protests in support of better pensions, wages, education and health care. If that were to happen, it’s possible the government would swing too far to the populist left to the detriment of the economy. FOLLOW THE CLIMATE CHANGE MONEYDespite the overwhelming evidence about climate change, there is still an alarming number of deniers. But if it was really all a big hoax or overblown, then why are the world’s biggest, most influential investment firms steering away from areas that are likely to be hit the hardest, such as the coasts? Goldman Sachs Group Inc. is considering real estate markets including Denver; Austin, Texas; and Nashville, Jeffrey Fine, a managing director at the firm’s merchant-banking division, said Thursday at a conference hosted by the NYU School of Professional Studies. Fine may not have specifically cited climate change, but according to Bloomberg News’s Gillian Tan, he did note that more companies and young people are moving away from the coasts. The Fed held its first conference on climate change last week in San Francisco, with one central bank official saying it has the potential to “displace people permanently” amid damaging wildfires in California and storms punishing the Eastern Seaboard. About 3 billion people — or some 40 percent of the world’s population — live within 200 kilometers (124 miles) of a coastline, according to Bloomberg News. It’s projected that by 2050 more than 1 billion will live directly at the water’s edge.TEA LEAVESThe idea that the U.S. consumer was strong and carrying the economy took a hit a month ago when Commerce Department data showed that retail sales in September fell unexpectedly. The 0.3% decline from August was directly opposite the 0.3% advance expected based on the median estimate of economists surveyed by Bloomberg. That’s why Friday’s update from the government on October retail sales is so critical, especially heading into the holiday sales season. Economists are calling for a 0.2% rebound. Bloomberg Economics isn’t so optimistic, saying that decelerating wage growth suggests household demand will moderate. It is forecasting no change in spending. Although the headline number will get the attention, the smart money will be looking at sales among a control group that are used to calculate GDP and exclude food services, auto dealers, building-material stores and gas stations. By that measure, sales are seen rising 0.3% from no change in September.DON’T MISS Stock Investors Could Use a Refresher on the Basics: Nir Kaissar You Care About Earnings? The Stock Market Doesn’t: John Authers Too Many Young American Men Still Aren’t Working: Justin Fox Brazil’s Politics and Economics Are Growing Apart: Mac Margolis Matt Levine's Money Stuff: You Can Buy Almost All the StocksTo contact the author of this story: Robert Burgess at bburgess@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Robert Burgess is an editor for Bloomberg Opinion. He is the former global executive editor in charge of financial markets for Bloomberg News. As managing editor, he led the company’s news coverage of credit markets during the global financial crisis.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Wells Fargo general counsel to leave the bank early next year
    American City Business Journals

    Wells Fargo general counsel to leave the bank early next year

    Wells Fargo & Co.'s general counsel Allen Parker is leaving to pursue other career opportunities, the bank said in a press release on Thursday.

  • Top Research Reports for Disney, Wells Fargo & Vale
    Zacks

    Top Research Reports for Disney, Wells Fargo & Vale

    Top Research Reports for Disney, Wells Fargo & Vale

  • NALCAB, LiftFund and Wells Fargo Announce Launch of Largest National Loan Fund for the Growth of Latino-Owned Small Businesses
    Business Wire

    NALCAB, LiftFund and Wells Fargo Announce Launch of Largest National Loan Fund for the Growth of Latino-Owned Small Businesses

    The Wells Fargo Foundation has made a historic $10 million grant to NALCAB — National Association for Latino Community Asset Builders — to support growth-oriented lending to minority-owned businesses nationwide through a network of Latino-led nonprofit business lenders. The new Acceso Loan Fund is designed to help diverse entrepreneurs scale to a greater size — expanding their revenue, impact on the economy and ability to provide jobs. The Acceso Loan Fund will provide small business loans in the range of $50,000–$500,000.

  • Apollo Global (APO) to Acquire Tech Data for $5.4 Billion
    Zacks

    Apollo Global (APO) to Acquire Tech Data for $5.4 Billion

    Continuing with strategic moves, Apollo Global (APO) signs deal to acquire Tech Data (TECD), with the aim to boost the latter's position in the market.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Wells Fargo former interim CEO Allen Parker to step down as general counsel

    Wells Fargo & Co on Thursday said its general counsel Allen Parker, who was formerly interim chief executive officer, would step down in March 2020. Parker joined Wells as general counsel in March 2017, served as interim CEO and president from March 2019 to October 2019, and then returned to the general counsel role. In September, the Wall Street bank named Charles Scharf as its next leader, after a wide-ranging sales practices scandal claimed two CEOs.

  • Why Is Wells Fargo (WFC) Up 7.5% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is Wells Fargo (WFC) Up 7.5% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Wells Fargo (WFC) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Wells Fargo former interim CEO Parker steps down as general counsel
    Reuters

    Wells Fargo former interim CEO Parker steps down as general counsel

    The departure, effective March 2020, comes at a time when Charles Scharf is beginning to put his own mark on the bank’s leadership team. Last week, the fourth-largest U.S. bank hired former JP Morgan Chase executive and previous White House official, William Daley, to head public affairs. The appointment of Daley, a former Bank of New York Mellon executive, was an early sign that Scharf might bring in more of his long-time lieutenants.

  • Business Wire

    Allen Parker to Leave Wells Fargo to Pursue Other Business Opportunities

    Wells Fargo & Company today announced that General Counsel C. Allen Parker has made the decision to leave the company effective March 31, 2020, to pursue other business opportunities. Parker joined Wells Fargo as General Counsel in March 2017, served as interim CEO and President from March 2019 to October 2019, and then returned to the General Counsel role. The company will commence a search for a new General Counsel immediately with the goal being that Parker will assist in a smooth transition to the new General Counsel.

  • Why Bank ETFs May Soar in 2020
    Zacks

    Why Bank ETFs May Soar in 2020

    Rising deposits, solid dividend payments, solid GDP growth and compelling valuations can fuel bank ETFs in 2020.

  • Barrons.com

    Wells Fargo Has a New CEO. Deutsche Bank Has Questions.

    Analyst Matt O’Connor laid out a series of questions for Charlie Scharf, who took the helm last month.

  • Stock buybacks of $570 billion next year may support the S&P 500 even if there’s a recession, report says
    MarketWatch

    Stock buybacks of $570 billion next year may support the S&P 500 even if there’s a recession, report says

    According to French bank Societe Generale, stock buybacks for S&P 500 companies may reach $570 billion in 2019.

  • Vendors squeezed in Wells Fargo cost cutting push
    Reuters

    Vendors squeezed in Wells Fargo cost cutting push

    Wells Fargo spokesman Peter Gilchrist said participation in the voluntary rebate would not be considered when awarding future contacts. The bank is expected to issue a new request for business proposals from its IT vendors in the first quarter of next year. Chief Financial Officer John Shrewsberry recently pointed to professional services, or work by consultants, as a expense line that analysts and investors can expect to be reduced in the next quarter.