YCL - ProShares Ultra Yen

NYSEArca - NYSEArca Delayed Price. Currency in USD
54.38
+0.14 (+0.26%)
At close: 10:41AM EDT
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Previous Close54.24
Open54.43
Bid54.35 x 900
Ask54.38 x 1100
Day's Range54.38 - 54.43
52 Week Range53.53 - 61.96
Volume102
Avg. Volume2,322
Net Assets5.56M
NAV54.25
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
Yield0.00%
YTD Return-5.71%
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.85
Expense Ratio (net)1.01%
Inception Date2008-11-24
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Treasury Yields and Trade War Fears Driving USD-JPY Price Action
    Market Realist10 months ago

    Treasury Yields and Trade War Fears Driving USD-JPY Price Action

    The Japanese yen (JYN) returned to weakness against the US dollar as political uncertainty in the euro area fell at the end of the week that ended on June 1. The Japanese yen (FXY) closed the week at 109.55, falling 0.15% against the US dollar (UUP) for the week that ended on June 1. Many developments last week, including renewed tariffs from the US government, should have increased the demand for the yen due to its safe-haven characteristics, but investor indifference to these developments limited any gains.

  • Will Safe-Haven Demand Push the Japanese Yen Higher?
    Market Realist11 months ago

    Will Safe-Haven Demand Push the Japanese Yen Higher?

    Last week, the Japanese yen (JYN) managed its first weekly gain against the US dollar in nine weeks as global risk aversion increased in response to political and geopolitical uncertainties. The yen (FXY) closed the week at 109.39, rising 1.2% against the US dollar (UUP). The news about US President Donald Trump canceling the US–North Korea summit and political uncertainties in Europe increased the demand for safe-haven assets, including the yen.

  • Why Fed Minutes Could Put Further Pressure on the Yen
    Market Realist11 months ago

    Why Fed Minutes Could Put Further Pressure on the Yen

    Last week, the Japanese yen (JYN) depreciated against the US dollar for the eighth consecutive week as the dollar continued its upward surge. It was the best run for the dollar against the yen since October 2014. The primary reason for the yen’s weakness is the widening spread between the US and Japanese treasuries, which is being driven by strong US economic performance compared to Japan.

  • Could There Be Respite for the Falling Yen?
    Market Realist11 months ago

    Could There Be Respite for the Falling Yen?

    The US Iran nuclear deal pullout failed to increase demand for haven bids such as the yen. The yen (FXY) closed last week at 109.39 against the US dollar (UUP), depreciating by 0.25%. A weak yen is positive for the export-dependent Japanese economy.

  • Will the Japanese Yen Continue to Depreciate against the US Dollar?
    Market Realist11 months ago

    Will the Japanese Yen Continue to Depreciate against the US Dollar?

    Last week, the Japanese yen (JYN) depreciated against the US dollar for a sixth consecutive week as the US dollar continued to rally. The US dollar rallied due to the Fed’s hawkishness and continued economic improvement. As Japanese markets were closed for three days last week, there was limited data reported from the Japanese economy. In the week ended May 4, the yen (FXY) closed at 109.1 against the US dollar (UUP), depreciating 0.06%. The yen’s (YCL) dream run seems to be done for now, and yen speculators have moved into bearish territory after staying net long for a little over four weeks.

  • What’s Next for the Yen after Global Risks Recede?
    Market Realistlast year

    What’s Next for the Yen after Global Risks Recede?

    The Japanese yen (JYN) depreciated against the US dollar for a fifth consecutive week, as the US dollar continued to rally on the back of higher bond yields and the prospect of a faster rate hike pace from the US Fed. The Bank of Japan had its April meeting and left all policy rates unchanged, and the key takeaway was removing the target date to achieve the 2% inflation target. Japanese yen (YCL) speculators are moving back into short territory after staying net-long for four weeks. As per the latest “Commitment of Traders” (or COT) report, released on April 27 by the Chicago Futures Trading Commission (or CFTC), speculators on the Japanese yen had a net long position of 583 contracts, compared to 2,591 long contracts the week before.

  • Bank of Japan: Weak Data Might Mean More Easing
    Market Realistlast year

    Bank of Japan: Weak Data Might Mean More Easing

    The Japanese yen (JYN) continued its depreciating trend in the previous week. Risk aversion receded and the US dollar rallied following higher bond yields and commodity prices. Now that geopolitical risks have declined, the demand for the yen as a safe haven will likely be low and could lead to more depreciation.