AMZN - Amazon.com, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
1,777.43
+10.05 (+0.57%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

1,796.50 +19.07 (1.07%)
Pre-Market: 7:32AM EDT

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Previous Close1,767.38
Open1,773.33
Bid1,792.57 x 800
Ask1,795.00 x 2200
Day's Range1,770.62 - 1,786.08
52 Week Range1,307.00 - 2,035.80
Volume2,643,572
Avg. Volume3,262,000
Market Cap879.216B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.63
PE Ratio (TTM)73.74
EPS (TTM)24.10
Earnings DateOct 24, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est2,301.86
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • September retail sales drop for the first time in seven months
    Yahoo Finance Video

    September retail sales drop for the first time in seven months

    Retail sales dropped for the first time in seven months in September. Unexpectedly falling 0.3% last month. Analysts polled by Bloomberg had estimated a 0.3% increase. Charcy Evers, Retail Trends analyst joins Yahoo Finance's Akiko Fujita to discuss.

  • Retail sales unexpectedly decline 0.3% in September
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Retail sales unexpectedly decline 0.3% in September

    Yahoo Finance’s Alexis Christoforous and Brian Sozzi dig into the retail sales numbers with Gregory Daco, Chief U.S. Economist at Oxford Economics.

  • MarketWatch

    Ford introduces electric charging network with 12,000 stations, teams with Amazon on home installation

    Ford Motor Co. introduced Thursday an electric-vehicle network with more than 12,000 charging stations, and more than 35,000 charge plugs in North America. The automaker said it was teaming up with Amazon.com Inc.'s home services business to offer installation of home charging setups. Ford shares edged up 0.15 in premarket trading and Amazon's stock gained 1%. Ford said it is providing two years of free access to the electric charging network. The company said it was collaborating with Electrify America to provide DC fast chargers, in which an estimated 47 miles of range could be added in 10 minutes at a 150-kilowatt charger, and customers can charge their batteries from 10% to 80% full in 45 minutes. Ford's stock has lost 12.2% over the past three months while the Dow Jones Industrial Average has slipped 0.8%.

  • Barrons.com

    Amazon Stock Is Still Underpriced, Credit Suisse Says

    A team of analysts say the stock has 35% upside, citing growth in retail, streaming products, and Amazon Web Services.

  • Amazon Holiday Toy List Slots Can Cost Brands Up to $2 Million
    Bloomberg

    Amazon Holiday Toy List Slots Can Cost Brands Up to $2 Million

    (Bloomberg) -- Amazon.com Inc. just released its annual holiday toy guide, telling customers the Lego Disney castle, VTech’s Magical unicorn and more than 100 other items were “thoughtfully curated to help shoppers quickly tackle even the lengthiest holiday shopping lists.”What Amazon doesn’t mention are the millions of dollars it charges the toy industry just to be considered for a spot on the popular gift guide.Amazon sells Holiday Toy List sponsorships for as much as $2 million, according to documents reviewed by Bloomberg. The more sponsors pay, the more products they can nominate to be on the list and the more prominently their own products will be featured on the popular website. Amazon aimed to sell at least $20 million in sponsorships for this year’s list, the documents show. Amazon also published a summer toy list with lower sponsorship prices.It’s perfectly legal for Amazon to sell advertising on its site. It becomes a problem when the world’s largest online retailer tells shoppers recommendations are curated by experts but doesn’t disclose the money it gets from the toy industry, said Robert Weissman, president of the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen. Because consumers place more value on recommendations from independent sources, he said, companies prefer to keep their financial involvement hidden.“They don’t write ‘paid ad’ on it because it completely changes how consumers perceive the information,” Weissman said. “If the list is entirely or in part paid advertising, people have a right to know.”Amazon likened the payments it received to the money brands pay stores to be included in advertising circulars or to get prominent shelf space. In an emailed statement, the company said: “Every product on our annual Holiday Toy List, which features family gift ideas from new releases to customer favorites, is independently curated by a team of in-house experts based on a high bar for quality, design, innovation and play experience. We source product ideas from many places, including our selling partners who have an opportunity to nominate their best toys for the season and increase visibility of those toys.”Gift lists are a time-tested way for toy manufacturers to stand out in the critical holiday rush when busy parents are desperate for ideas. Toymakers are eager to appear on these lists because the companies generate about half their annual sales during the holiday season.Walmart Inc. charges toymakers $10,000 monthly per product to appear on its “Buyer’s Picks” toy list in November and December, according to documents reviewed by Bloomberg. The company produces other lists, including “Top Rated by Kids,” which uses feedback from children who test and rate more than 100 toys in July. Walmart and its toy suppliers partner to determine which 100 toys will be tested. Spokeswoman Leigh Stidham said suppliers and brands cannot pay to be included on the latter list, but didn’t comment on “Buyer’s Picks.”Parents looking for independent recommendations can turn to toy lists produced by third-party reviewers such as Toy Insider and Toys, Tots, Pets & More (TTPM). But in an era when customer reviews can be gamed and social-media influencers push products without always disclosing that they’re getting paid, consumers sometimes struggle to distinguish between objective online recommendations and paid promotions.The law is murky about precisely what should be disclosed and when. The Federal Trade Commission, which enforces deceptive advertising laws, issues general guidelines. A full-page magazine photo of a thirsty runner guzzling from a glistening bottle of Fiji water is so obviously an advertisement it doesn’t have to be disclosed. If the same water brand pays the magazine to publish what appears to be a news story about the health benefits of its product, it must be clearly labeled an advertisement so consumers aren’t confused.While federal regulators are taking a closer look at advertising these days, they can’t possibly monitor all the promotional activity out there. So the FTC occasionally cracks down to send a message, as it did in 2017 with letters to more than 90 influencers and marketers reminding them about the need to disclose paid promotions in social media. The spotty enforcement presents a big gray area for the toy industry.The lists are a powerful negotiating tool for retailers, according to industry insiders familiar with the process. Toymakers are led to understand that if they buy marketing space on the lists they will get bigger orders, the people said. Sometimes manufacturers get better visibility if they agree to sell a product exclusively through the retailer, they said. Retailers include only toys on the list that they are actually selling.Lists are a fast-growing part of Amazon’s advertising business. Amazon holiday gift guides promoting toys, electronics and home goods combined to generate more than $120 million in revenue in 2017, up about 40% from the previous year, according to documents reviewed by Bloomberg.What sets Amazon apart from other retailers is how much it charges for space on its toy page over the holidays. A narrow strip across the top of the web page costs $500,000 per month in November and December, up from $150,000 the rest of the year, according to documents reviewed by Bloomberg. A billboard ad atop the toys page runs $300,000 per month, up from $75,000 the rest of the year.Similar spots atop Walmart’s toy page cost $180,000 in November and $132,000 in December. According to Comscore, Amazon generates about twice as much web traffic as Walmart, which could explain the discrepancy in pricing.Public Citizen, the watchdog group, in July lodged a complaint with the FTC about Amazon’s annual summer sale Prime Day, alleging the retailer didn’t do enough to help shoppers differentiate between paid promotions and genuine recommendations. The FTC confirmed receiving the complaint. The annual toy list presents similar concerns, Weissman said.“When Amazon presents a top 100 toy list,” he said, “it’s a mistake to assume that shoppers understand this is just paid billboard space versus a list Amazon curated itself.”To contact the reporters on this story: Spencer Soper in Seattle at ssoper@bloomberg.net;Matt Townsend in New York at mtownsend9@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Robin Ajello at rajello@bloomberg.net, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Morningstar

    These U.S. Sectors Are More Global Than You Think

    As companies begin issuing third-quarter earnings this week, investors will be watching to see what impact ongoing trade tensions will have on results and guidance. Using Morningstar data, we've dug into the global revenue sources of various sectors, which provides some insight into which areas of the market may be more vulnerable to ongoing trade tensions. The technology, basic materials, and consumer defensive sectors generate the largest portion of their revenues abroad.

  • Twitter Q3 2019 Earnings Preview: Buy TWTR Stock Up 40% in 2019?
    Zacks

    Twitter Q3 2019 Earnings Preview: Buy TWTR Stock Up 40% in 2019?

    Twitter (TWTR) stock has surged roughly 40% in 2019 to fall just behind Facebook's (FB) 45%. Despite the run of success, Twitter shares remain an enigma to many on Wall Street...

  • GuruFocus.com

    Be Humble and Learn From Your Mistakes Like Warren Buffett

    Investors should perform post-mortems on their mistakes Continue reading...

  • Amazon (AMZN) Q3 2019 Earnings Preview: AWS, Prime & Advertising
    Zacks

    Amazon (AMZN) Q3 2019 Earnings Preview: AWS, Prime & Advertising

    Amazon stock is down 11% in the last three months heading into its Q3 earnings release on Thursday, October 24. So let's see what to expect from the e-commerce giant, including AWS, Prime, and advertising...

  • NVTC CEO Bobbie Kilberg to retire in June
    American City Business Journals

    NVTC CEO Bobbie Kilberg to retire in June

    Kilberg has shepherded the trade association since 1998, serving as a fixture in the D.C. technology space at a time of significant digital transformation for the region.

  • IBM Misses Estimates as Red Hat Fails to Offset Declines
    Bloomberg

    IBM Misses Estimates as Red Hat Fails to Offset Declines

    (Bloomberg) -- International Business Machines Corp. reported third-quarter revenue that missed Wall Street estimates, with the long-awaited revenue infusion from Red Hat failing to compensate for continued declines in other parts of its business.Total revenue was $18 billion in the three months ended Sept. 30, down 3.9% from a year earlier, the Armonk, New York-based company said in a statement Wednesday. Analysts had forecast $18.2 billion. It marked the fifth consecutive quarter of shrinking sales at IBM, while analysts had been looking for signs that Red Hat, which was incorporated for the first time in these results, would change the narrative.In July, IBM completed the purchase of the open-source software provider for $34 billion – sealing the world’s second-largest technology deal. Adjusted revenue from Red Hat was $371 million in the third quarter, better than the $350 million IBM told investors it was expecting in August. Red Hat was folded into IBM’s cloud and cognitive software unit, which pulled in $5.3 billion in revenue, up 6.4% from a year earlier.Still, IBM’s overall sales declined due to divestitures from commerce software businesses, foreign currency effects and poor performance in one of its key units. Revenue from Global Technology Services, the company’s infrastructure and tech support unit, fell 5.6% to $6.7 billion. Global Business Services revenue, which includes IBM’s consulting arm, increased only 1% to $4.1 billion. The shares fell 3.2% in extended trading. They had gained 25% this year through the close of trading Wednesday.“The one thing IBM doesn’t need is a disappointing quarter,” Ian Campbell, CEO of Boston-based Nucleus Research, said in an interview before the results were released. “There have been so many quarters that have shown a downward trend in revenue. This quarter we need to see some change as IBM has fallen to the point where they have no name recognition.”Chief Executive Officer Ginni Rometty is pegging IBM’s future to a hybrid cloud strategy by using Red Hat to offer enhanced security services on private and multiple public clouds. IBM hopes this new plan will allow it to partner with top cloud rivals like Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Corp.’s Azure, rather than being left behind in a trillion-dollar market where it’s been seeking growth for a decade.Analysts and investors might have to wait a little longer to see any real uptick in revenue growth from Red Hat. Chief Financial Officer Jim Kavanaugh said in an interview that IBM will be back to a sustained level of revenue growth in 2020.Earnings excluding some costs were $2.68 a share, largely in line with the average analyst projection of $2.67. IBM reiterated it sees full-year adjusted operating profit of $12.80 a share. (Updates with forecast for full-year operating profit in final paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Olivia Carville in New York at ocarville1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Netflix stock spikes after Q3 earnings beat expectations
    Yahoo Finance

    Netflix stock spikes after Q3 earnings beat expectations

    Netflix (NFLX) beat third-quarter earnings expectations, just before competitors launch a new batch of streaming services next month.

  • Amazon Stock Gets Price-Target Boost Ahead Of Quarterly Earnings
    Investor's Business Daily

    Amazon Stock Gets Price-Target Boost Ahead Of Quarterly Earnings

    The price target on Amazon stock was raised about 35% from where the stock currently traded Wednesday, coming a week before the e-commerce leader is set to report second-quarter earnings.

  • Tech Stocks for Dividend Investors to Buy as Q3 Earnings Season Heats Up
    Zacks

    Tech Stocks for Dividend Investors to Buy as Q3 Earnings Season Heats Up

    We used our Zacks Stock Screener to search for companies within the broader technology sector that also pay a dividend that investors might want to buy as Q3 earnings season heats up...

  • Amazon ships jobs to Antioch with big new lease
    American City Business Journals

    Amazon ships jobs to Antioch with big new lease

    And with one potential additional lease, the retail giant could more than double its swelling area footprint.

  • Benzinga

    4 Ways To Reward Yourself For Grocery Shopping

    Some days, it can be hard to motivate yourself to go grocery shopping. For those who need a good family planning credit card or something that rewards you for grocery shopping, here are a few of the best options to help motivate you to go grocery shopping. This credit card from American Express (NYSE: AXP) is one of the best in the industry when it comes to grocery store rewards.

  • India's Sitharaman: US trade pact a 'good possibility,' should come soon
    Yahoo Finance

    India's Sitharaman: US trade pact a 'good possibility,' should come soon

    As U.S. President Donald Trump hammers out a partial trade deal with China, Washington is moving forward on another front: India.

  • MarketWatch

    Ex-Cisco CEO John Chambers, star team of engineers have a startup targeting Amazon’s AWS

    Pensando Systems, the ultra-secretive Silicon Valley company, announced Wednesday in New York it is has developed hardware and software that lets companies run their computer servers more efficiently, particularly in the cloud.

  • Marijuana stocks, after declines of over 50%, are now only ludicrously overpriced
    MarketWatch

    Marijuana stocks, after declines of over 50%, are now only ludicrously overpriced

    The pot bubble has burst, but many companies’ shares are still trading at unjustified levels, says Brian Livingston.

  • Momentum investors are now buying shares of Apple, Amazon and Netflix
    MarketWatch

    Momentum investors are now buying shares of Apple, Amazon and Netflix

    The stock market is near highs after rising for a decade. The best tool to answer the question is to look at segmented money flows. Please click here for a chart showing segmented money flows in 11 popular tech stocks.

  • Amazon's 1.4M SF warehouse plans north of Orlando head for final approvals
    American City Business Journals

    Amazon's 1.4M SF warehouse plans north of Orlando head for final approvals

    A proposed Amazon warehouse in Deltona will seek its official approvals next month, potentially spurring more commercial development nearby and changing the perception of the bedroom community north of Orlando. Atlanta-based developer Seefried Industrial Properties intends to build an 85-acre, 1.4 million-square-foot warehouse between Interstate 4 and Normandy Boulevard, south of Graves Avenue, in the city north of Orlando. Deltona's city commission likely will approve the project — which is expected to create hundreds of jobs — on Nov. 4 in a second reading after unanimously voting in favor of the proposed warehouse on Oct. 7.

  • Counterfeits Put Google in Trouble as InvenTel Lawsuit Cleared
    Market Realist

    Counterfeits Put Google in Trouble as InvenTel Lawsuit Cleared

    A federal judge in New Jersey has cleared InvenTel Products to proceed with its lawsuit against Google (GOOGL), Reuters reports.

  • Facial recognition AI can’t identify trans and non-binary people
    Quartz

    Facial recognition AI can’t identify trans and non-binary people

    New research takes AI software from Amazon, IBM, and Microsoft to task.