DHR - Danaher Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
148.52
-2.78 (-1.84%)
At close: 4:03PM EST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close151.30
Open151.18
Bid147.99 x 1300
Ask148.55 x 1400
Day's Range148.28 - 152.06
52 Week Range94.59 - 153.02
Volume64,102,583
Avg. Volume6,968,817
Market Cap107B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.83
PE Ratio (TTM)44.06
EPS (TTM)3.37
Earnings DateJan 27, 2020 - Jan 31, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield0.68 (0.45%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-12-26
1y Target Est153.21
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  • Can Danaher Carry Momentum Into 2020?
    InvestorPlace

    Can Danaher Carry Momentum Into 2020?

    After a relatively muted year in 2018, Danaher (NYSE:DHR) has turned in a remarkable performance in the markets this year. Specifically, shares of DHR are up nearly 50% year-to-date. Just as importantly, the life sciences specialist has found robust momentum late into the year under very impressive volume.Source: Shutterstock Of course, most of these gains are associated with Danaher's acquisition of General Electric's (NYSE:GE) life sciences business. As The Motley Fool's Lee Samaha argues, the deal, while mutually beneficial for both organizations, substantially favors DHR stock. For GE, they get to divest in an asset to make their organization leaner and help reduce debt.But for Danaher, the acquisition is a real shot in the arm for its own finances. In 2012, Danaher's revenue jumped to nearly $18.3 billion. However, in the trailing 12-month period, the company is looking at $20.4 billion in top-line sales. That's not exactly an impressive growth rate when the time to get there is accounted for.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsHowever, with General Electric's biopharmaceutical and pharmaceutical diagnostics businesses under DHR's belt, the acquisition promises to revitalize the organization. Over the last several quarters, GE's life sciences unit has witnessed strong growth. On the other hand, GE's healthcare systems unit has started to go flat. * The 10 Worst Dividend Stocks of the Decade Following the details of the DHR-GE deal in General Electric's most recent third-quarter earnings report, shares of Danaher jumped higher. In fact, since the close of Nov. 14, DHR stock has gained 11%. Further, volume almost hit the 74 million shares mark. Throughout most of the year, volume was in the low-millions level.With all the enthusiasm toward DHR stock, should you buy in? Danaher Must Prove Itself Beyond the DealDepending on your time frame and overall investment strategy, DHR will either appeal to you or it won't. On one hand, not much is going wrong for the company. Aside from the slow revenue trend, Danaher consistently generates per-share profitability. Also, it generates strongly positive free cash flow, a metric that should improve even more with the GE unit acquisition.Notwithstanding this deal, is there much to be excited about?According to Deloitte's outlook on the global life sciences industry, this year and the next several years represent transition. With technological advances becoming especially pronounced in this sector, this dynamic has opened doors for disruption. Smaller organizations are able to forward transformative technologies, forcing the old guard to respond.Using Deloitte's language, "Data is now the currency of life sciences." In this regard, Danaher is taking the message of its core industry very seriously. For instance, GE's life sciences unit has pioneered several innovations in molecular imaging. Further, many of these innovations are backed by data points collected over several years.And as sector technologies improve, so will expectations for new and effective therapies. After all, the life sciences business isn't just about compelling research; at some point, people need to see tangible results.From the operational perspective, DHR's deal with GE makes perfect sense. But from the investor's point of view, this is a single albeit important catalyst. When the acquisition finalizes in 2020, the honeymoon phase will presumably end. Then, Danaher must start bringing home meaningful results.Given how much DHR stock has jumped this year, though, it's hard for me to imagine that shares will again have a banner year in 2020. DHR Appropriate for Very Patient InvestorsDon't read the above wrong: I'm not suggesting that Danaher is a sell. Far from it. Merely, I'm addressing the point that while the buyout of GE's life sciences unit is a net positive, when the deal closes, it will become very old news.And while Danaher is getting a great deal on paper - perhaps a bargain - there's a reason why GE sold: life sciences is a competitive field. Theoretically, DHR is better equipped to carry the inherent innovations forward, but it's no guarantee.As Deloitte pointed out, the industry is experiencing transformation and transition. Increasingly, next-generation technologies such as cognitive intelligence and blockchain have allowed smaller players to disrupt bigger ones.Bottom line: Danaher must stay on its toes while delivering substantive results. With DHR shares having jumped so strongly in 2019, from a tactical perspective, I think waiting is the right move.As of this writing, Josh Enomoto did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * The 10 Worst Dividend Stocks of the Decade * 7 Game-Changing Tech Stocks to Buy Now * 5 Chinese Stocks to Buy for the Big 2020 Rebound The post Can Danaher Carry Momentum Into 2020? appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • General Electric's (GE) GECAS Unit Divests PK AirFinance
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  • 4 Things You Should Know Before Investing in General Electric Stock
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    4 Things You Should Know Before Investing in General Electric Stock

    If you're looking for short-term gains, General Electric (NYSE:GE) is not exactly what you'd consider a compelling buy. GE stock is regarded as a moderate buy on Wall Street, with potential upside of 4%.Source: Carsten Reisinger / Shutterstock.com The GE stock price is up almost 50% year to date, but this is still a far cry from where the company's shares were just a few years ago. But General Electric does have long-term potential, which could make it a good buy for the right investor. Consider the following four factors before investing in General Electric stock.1\. GE still has a heavy debt loadInvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsOne of the biggest issues General Electric has to address is its heavy debt load. In 2017, the company's total debt topped $135 billion. GE has pared down on this number since, but the company still has more than $115 billion in outstanding debt, far exceeding the company's yearly earnings.2\. General Electric's healthcare business is growingGeneral Electric is currently in the process of selling its biopharma business to Danaher (NYSE:DHR) for $21 billion. Once that's done, the company will be re-evaluating what's left of its healthcare business. * 10 Best-Performing Growth Stocks of the 2010s Simply put, GE Healthcare is a medical device company that brings in $17 billion in revenue and has strong free cash flow conversion. It's not the most profitable business segment, but it is growing at a stable rate.3\. Aviation could help GE stock take offOne of General Electric's most-valuable assets is its aviation segment. The company produces engines that power commercial airplanes, military planes, and helicopters. This segment alone generated $55 billion in new sales at June's Paris Air Show. The strength of GE's aviation business alone may make it worth holding onto the stock.4\. Wall Street is lukewarm on GE stock On Wall Street, General Electric is considered somewhat of a controversial topic. Most analysts are supportive of the company's not-so-new CEO, Larry Culp, and agree he's the right person for the job.Culp was able to pay down a substantial amount of GE's debt by selling off many of the company's assets. He's also been working to improve the company's operations. * 7 Energy Stocks That Are Still Worth Buying In 2020 But it's still up for debate whether Culp alone will be enough to propel GE stock forward. The stock is considered a moderate buy on Wall Street, and most analysts see very little upside in General Electric stock's future. Bottom Line on GE StockAll in all, most people are divided when it comes to GE stock. The company has acknowledged that 2019 is a rebuilding year, and GE has made a number of promising steps forward.The company has many promising business segments, but there are still many headwinds in its future. It may be a good idea to wait before investing in General Electric.As of this writing, Jamie Johnson did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * The 10 Worst Dividend Stocks of the Decade * 7 Game-Changing Tech Stocks to Buy Now * 5 Chinese Stocks to Buy for the Big 2020 Rebound The post 4 Things You Should Know Before Investing in General Electric Stock appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Danaher to Lower Stake in Envista, Finalizes Exchange Ratio
    Zacks

    Danaher to Lower Stake in Envista, Finalizes Exchange Ratio

    Danaher (DHR) sets the exchange ratio for each share of Danaher common stock at 5.5784 shares of Envista common stock.

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    Danaher Announces Final Exchange Ratio Of 5.5784 for Envista Exchange Offer

    Danaher Corporation (NYSE: DHR) announced today the final exchange ratio for its previously announced offer to holders of shares of Danaher common stock to exchange their shares of Danaher common stock for shares of common stock of Envista Holdings Corporation (NYSE: NVST) owned by Danaher.

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    Danaher Announces Quarterly Dividend

    Danaher Corporation (NYSE: DHR) announced today that its Board of Directors has approved a regular quarterly cash dividend of $0.17 per share of its common stock, payable on January 31, 2020 to holders of record on December 27, 2019. In addition, Danaher announced today that its Board of Directors has approved a quarterly cash dividend of $11.875 per share of its 4.75% Series A Mandatory Convertible Preferred Stock, payable on January 15, 2020 to holders of record on December 31, 2019.

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  • Larry Culp’s General Electric Depends on Restructuring Plan
    InvestorPlace

    Larry Culp’s General Electric Depends on Restructuring Plan

    Since becoming General Electric (NYSE:GE) CEO in October 2018, Larry Culp has made the company a favorite of turnaround lovers.Source: Sergey Kohl / Shutterstock.com If you picked up some shares one year ago, you're sitting on a gain of 54%. But it's all a matter of timing. If you bought the day Culp joined, you're still down 14%.The glory days of Jeff Immelt, when this was a $30 stock and a dividend aristocrat, are gone forever. Culp has frozen pensions, leading to talk of a general "pension crisis" sweeping the world.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsBut Culp has also remade his executive team, made hard decisions on what to keep and let new hires make forward-looking statements.From here, everything depends on execution. Hard DecisionsCulp's hardest decision may have been to let General Electric's biopharma unit go to his former employer, Danaher (NYSE:DHR). The cash is desperately needed to firm up the balance sheet, which still had $76 billion of debt on it, against a market capitalization of $94 billion, in September. * 7 Retail Stocks to Buy That Dominated Thanksgiving Shopping As I wrote in July, those numbers understate the case. The company also has $74 billion of "other liabilities" -- pensions and risks from old long-term care policies -- to deal with.The pension freeze helps with the former. The latter is a 25-year old legacy from former CEO Jack Welch, who took on re-insurance for long-term care policies before the cost of nursing care became apparent. Activists want Welch to turn in his retirement payout, as well as Immelt, whom I consider the greatest destroyer of shareholder value the world has ever known. It ain't happening. The New ToneThese moves have created a new tone around the company. Product rollouts are now called victories and buzzwords like "citizen developer" are gaining traction.Some analysts are coming around. Home Depot (NYSE:HD) co-founder Ken Langone says he likes General Electric again, saying Culp "is doing a hell of a job."But this is only tone. General Electric under Culp remains much as it was under Immelt and his successor, John Flannery, an industrial machine company. GE Power remains a drag on results, although the company now makes more from renewable energy equipment like wind turbines. Healthcare is mostly big machines. Boeing (NYSE:BA) remains a drag on GE Aviation, and GE Capital can no longer soften the blows.For the third quarter, General Electric reported a loss of nearly $6 billion, 69 cents per share, on revenues of $23.4 billion. Culp emphasized that losses from continuing operations were just 8 cents per share. He showed $650 million in industrial free cash flow. He also pointed to a backlog of orders that now totals $386 billion, mostly for jet engines and industrial turbines. Since then the shares are up 9%, against a 2.5% gain for the average S&P 500 stock.Not everyone is convinced. JPMorgan Chase (NYSE:JPM) analyst Stephen Tusa, who saw the Immelt disaster coming and may wear the label "GE Bear" to his grave, says General Electric is still missing targets set only in March. He believes numbers look good only because of restructured spending. The Bottom Line on General ElectricGeneral Electric remains an industrial goods company. Industrial goods are not a great business to be in. The company continues to struggle with enormous debt. The amount it will owe on those long-term care policies remains uncertain.I continue to wish Culp well, but from the sidelines. General Electric is, at best, a speculation. If you buy shares today, you're betting it can generate big profits from industrial revenue, and that it can grow. Hope is still not a plan.Dana Blankenhorn is a financial and technology journalist. His latest book is Technology's Big Bang: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow with Moore's Law, essays on technology available at the Amazon Kindle store. Write him at danablankenhorn@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter at @danablankenhorn. As of this writing he owned shares in JPM. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Retail Stocks to Buy That Dominated Thanksgiving Shopping * 6 Manufacturing Stocks to Buy as the Economy Recovers * The 7 Best Cryptocurrencies to Buy as Blockchain Heats Up The post Larry Culp's General Electric Depends on Restructuring Plan appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Was Danaher Corporation's (NYSE:DHR) Earnings Decline Part Of A Broader Industry Downturn?
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  • Is Danaher Corporation (DHR) A Good Stock To Buy ?
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    GE Named a New CFO. Why CEO Larry Culp Says It Hired the Right Woman for the Job.

    Analysts had been looking for GE to hire a “rock star” CFO, and the Street is weighing in now that a selection has been made. CEO Larry Culp has some thoughts on the choice too.

  • GE's New CFO Lacks 'Wow' Factor and That's Fine
    Bloomberg

    GE's New CFO Lacks 'Wow' Factor and That's Fine

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- General Electric Co.’s choice for its next chief financial officer lacks a “wow” factor but checks the right boxes.  The industrial giant announced on Monday that it had hired Carolina Dybeck Happe – currently the CFO at Copenhagen-based shipping company A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S – to help CEO Larry Culp carry out a turnaround that’s finally starting to yield some results. Jamie Miller announced her intention to step down as GE’s CFO in July, and the company’s been looking for a replacement ever since. Miller will officially hand over the reins to Dybeck Happe in early 2020.Dybeck Happe previously spent more than 15 years at Stockholm-based lock maker Assa Abloy AB, but she has little name recognition in the U.S. Certainly, this isn’t the kind of blockbuster hire that some investors had been hoping to see. Many had their eye on Daniel Comas, Culp’s previous right-hand man at Danaher Corp.  A hire like that would have gotten more reaction out of the stock. Instead, shares of GE traded up about 1% Monday amid a broader rally. Still, amid ongoing investigations by the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission into GE’s accounting practices, the value of simply announcing a hire and putting this matter to bed shouldn’t be discounted. And frankly, there is enough of a cult of personality already baked in to the current price. Most investors would tell you the stock could easily be 50% lower if it weren’t for Culp and the reputation for operational excellency he earned in his Danaher years.Culp has managed to so far avoid fresh nasty surprises in the long-term care insurance business and elsewhere at GE Capital, while the troubled power business no longer appears to be in free fall. There’s still a long way to go in this turnaround story, though. Remaining headaches for GE include a competitive market for what little demand remains for gas turbines in a world increasingly turning to renewable energy; the impact from divestitures; a fierce debate about the sustainability of its aviation unit’s free cash flow; and a continuing need to restructure, particularly in Europe where cost-cutting discussions can be notoriously difficult. Culp needs someone to help him execute on further operational changes, of course. He also could use the perspective of another outsider to continue to root out the cultural problems that led the company into this mess. Miller did a stint at insurance company WellPoint Inc., but she’s been with GE since 2008 and was likely too much of an insider to execute the kind of overhaul the company really needs. This includes finally breaking with its tendency to over-engineer its financial statements and prioritize optics over reality.There’s no reason why Dybeck Happe can’t be that person. Shares in Assa Abloy returned more than 150% to investors over the course of Dybeck Happe’s tenure as CFO there amid a spike in earnings, fueled in part by prudent cost control and in part by a steady stream of M&A. She’s only been at Moller-Maersk since January, but also sits on the board of Schneider Electric SE. Dybeck Happe’s European background could prove particularly helpful to GE on the cost-cutting dilemmas tied to its ill-fated acquisition of Alstom SA’s energy arm. And it’s nice to see a female executive replaced by another female executive for a change. Dybeck Happe was the first female CFO in Moller-Maersk’s 115-year history and was appointed there after at least one investor asked for more diversity, so her departure will be felt at the male-heavy company. Moller-Maersk’s loss may just be GE’s gain.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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    GE CEO Culp Really Has Been Doing What He Said He’d Do. Here’s Proof.

    Wall Street may want to give GE CEO Larry Culp more credit for calming down the situation at the company and for getting up to speed quickly. An analysis of the GE CEO’s statements. An analysis of his statements shows why.

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  • Danaher (DHR) Catches Eye: Stock Jumps 5%
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