DOMO - Domo, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
16.33
+0.02 (+0.12%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

16.33 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:00PM EDT

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Previous Close16.31
Open16.24
Bid16.34 x 1100
Ask17.85 x 800
Day's Range15.89 - 16.57
52 Week Range13.28 - 47.08
Volume262,678
Avg. Volume836,335
Market Cap449.155M
Beta (3Y Monthly)N/A
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-4.80
Earnings DateSep 5, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est26.83
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Some Domo (NASDAQ:DOMO) Shareholders Are Down 14%
    Simply Wall St.

    Some Domo (NASDAQ:DOMO) Shareholders Are Down 14%

    The simplest way to benefit from a rising market is to buy an index fund. When you buy individual stocks, you can make...

  • GlobeNewswire

    Announcing Domo for Square, a New Application to Help Merchants with Multiple Square Accounts Easily Unlock Real-Time Business Insights and Value from All their Square Data

    Domo (DOMO) today announced a new application, Domo for Square, which empowers merchants that have multiple Square accounts to easily unlock real-time business insights and value from all their Square data. With the Domo for Square app, sellers that have multiple Square accounts receive consolidated reporting of all their Square data through a pre-built Domo experience that’s available to them on any device. Once the data is consolidated in Domo, sellers have a variety of interactive and powerful visualizations to better understand what’s happening across their business.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Domo Ranked as an Overall Experience Leader and a Credibility Leader in Dresner Advisory Services' 2019 SME Business Intelligence Market Study

    Domo (NASDAQ: DOMO) today announced that it was ranked an Overall Experience Leader and a Credibility Leader in Dresner Advisory Services’ 2019 Small and Mid-Sized Enterprise (SME) Business Intelligence (BI) Market Study.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Assurance Financial Partners With Domo to Unlock End-To-End Customer Journey Data

    Domo announced today that Assurance Financial has chosen the Domo platform to help its efforts to boost marketing efforts and ultimately, originate more loans. As an award-winning home loan expert and a top mortgage finance company licensed in 41 states, Assurance Financial offers a full range of online and in-person services.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Domo Ranked Leader in Two New G2 Crowd Reports

    Domo (DOMO) today announced it has been named a leader in two of G2 Crowd’s latest Grid® reports for Business Intelligence (BI) platforms. Domo ranked first in the BI Platforms category and second among Enterprise BI platforms, receiving high scores for ease of use, quality support and ease of doing business. Domo also achieved a user satisfaction rating of 90 and 94 percent in each respective report.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Domo Recognized on the Utah Valley BusinessQ UV50 List of Fastest Growing Companies

    Domo ranked no. 23 among the fastest-growing Utah Valley companies. Utah Valley BusinessQ divides the UV50 list into three parts: the 30 fastest-growing companies by revenue, 10 economic engines and 10 startups to watch. Domo is a winner of UV50’s “triple crown,” having appeared on all three lists in prior years.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Domo Welcomes Jeff Kearl, Stance Co-Founder and Chairman, to its Board of Directors

    Domo (DOMO) today announced that Jeff Kearl, Stance co-founder and chairman, has joined its board of directors. Kearl also served on the board of directors for SkullCandy for almost a dozen years. Kearl is an active investor, having invested in approximately 50 private companies.

  • We’ve Seen the WeWork Saga Before. It’s Called Domo.
    Bloomberg

    We’ve Seen the WeWork Saga Before. It’s Called Domo.

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The company badly needs an initial public offering to fund its cash-burning business. The chief executive is brilliant at pitching investors but also has ironclad power and milks his company to the benefit of himself and family members. Early financial backers are taking a bath on their investments.That description fits WeWork, the controversial office-leasing startup that is having a hard time with its planned IPO and may now face a boardroom fight to potentially remove its CEO. It also applied — minus the possible coup — to Domo Inc., a software company that held up in the first six months after its rocky 2018 market debut and then crashed. If those who owned shares of Domo before the IPO still have them, their investment has shriveled by as much as 86%.Each disastrous company is a disaster in its own way.(1)But Domo’s trajectory shows that even if a company built on an unsteady foundation completes an IPO, the weak spots still remain. Domo started in 2010 and was buzzy in cloistered tech circles. The founder and CEO, Josh James, helped start a marketing analysis startup called Omniture in the relatively early internet era and sold the company at a large windfall for himself and Omniture’s investors. James has said he started Domo to address a need for corporate bosses to easily keep tabs on basic metrics, such as real-time store sales or the risk of clients quitting. At Domo, James had a knack for charisma and raising money. Domo sold $700 million in stock and borrowed $100 million more. The company’s investor list and its board were stacked with respected technology startup backers including IVP, Benchmark, GGV and the investment-fund giants BlackRock and T. Rowe Price.By about 2015, Domo appeared to have trouble. Some of its investors marked down the value of shares purchased in private transactions. Last year, when Domo made its finances public for an IPO, it was eye-opening. The IPO document said that Domo needed a public stock sale or another source of cash urgently or it might have to slash costs to avoid running out of money. (A subsequent investor document toned down the urgency somewhat.) The pace of revenue gains was good but not great, and Domo was spending a fortune to grow. The filing disclosed that James had 40 times the power of other stockholders, which was notable even in this era of superpowered voting stock held by tech company founders. James had also billed Domo for use of his personal jet, and businesses part-owned by him and affiliated with two of his brothers had catered food for Domo and sold furnishings to the company. The combination of Domo’s heavy spending, precarious financial condition and the CEO’s self-dealing made me wonder how a company could have gone off the rails so badly without any apparent accountability imposed by supposedly savvy investors. It’s not an unfamiliar tale for young companies, but Domo seemed like an outlier — until WeWork took the worrying qualities of Domo to a whole other level, that is.  Like WeWork, Domo scaled back some of the financial arrangements with the CEO.(4)Its IPO got done, but not happily. Domo’s early backers had purchased stock at an effective price as high as $126.45,(2)and the company sold IPO shares at $21 each. Almost every investor who bought stock in the company’s history had nothing to show for it.Once it went public in June 2018, Domo put up quarterly results that were healthy for a while. The share price rose to a high of $44 in March. Things started to fade after that, and Domo’s stock price tumbled this month after the company cut its financial forecast and shook up its business and sales strategies.(5) Believers in Domo remain, and other young software companies haven’t figured out the right approach to selling their products. But the same red flags are still there. Domo has been spending about 77 cents in sales and marketing costs for each dollar in recorded revenue. It’s among the least efficient business software companies with its sales and marketing spending. Domo’s cash-burn rate has improved but remains high. Executives said recently that the company is committed to becoming financially self-sustaining and is willing to cut costs to get there, according to JMP Securities. That’s not the usual condition for a growth company. Investors don’t learn lessons when they should, but Domo is a cautionary tale for WeWork and others. Companies with wobbly financials, a track record of imprudent spending and a history of self-dealing don’t magically change when they go public — no matter if they are humbled by a valuation haircut or pare back some of the excesses.There are limits to the comparison between Domo and WeWork. I have never, ever seen a company like WeWork, and a potential effort to remove a founder-CEO on the eve of an IPO is an unimaginable drama.(6) But it remains a useful caution that Domo is a nine-year-old company that has not delivered anything good for investors. The company’s wayward operation and poor governance were exposed when it had to disclose them to the world.When people howl about unseemly financial arrangements with a CEO or a lack of accountability, it’s not because a company is violating a meaningless checklist of good governance. It’s because those are obvious hallmarks of companies built on weak foundations. (1) I sincerely apologize to Leo Tolstoy.(2) Domo noted that the company believed it got "favorable pricing" for James's jet and the catering and furnishings provided by his companies. That was not the point.(3) The pre-IPO stock prices have been adjusted for stock splits.(4) Like many companies priced for growth, Domo's share price has been volatile and could shoot back up just as it has crashed recently.(5) Another difference between Domo and WeWork: Domo's category of subscription software is a business model that is well understood and (for now) loved by stock market investors. No so much WeWork.To contact the author of this story: Shira Ovide at sovide@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Shira Ovide is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. She previously was a reporter for the Wall Street Journal.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Cloud Software Stocks Gaining Traction: 5 Join the Fray
    Zacks

    Cloud Software Stocks Gaining Traction: 5 Join the Fray

    Having become an integral part in every walk of life, cloud-focused tech stocks have quite easily clicked with investors.

  • Domo Enters Oversold Territory
    Zacks

    Domo Enters Oversold Territory

    Domo, Inc. (DOMO) has been on a bit of a cold streak lately, but there might be light at the end of the tunnel for this overlooked stock.

  • ACCESSWIRE

    SHAREHOLDER ALERT: Pomerantz Law Firm Investigates Claims On Behalf of Investors of Domo, Inc. - DOMO

    NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / September 13, 2019 / Pomerantz LLP is investigating claims on behalf of investors of Domo, Inc. (“Domo” or the “Company”) (NASDAQ:DOMO). Such investors are advised to contact ...

  • Zacks

    Knocking on the Door of New Highs

    Knocking on the Door of New Highs

  • ACCESSWIRE

    Bronstein, Gewirtz & Grossman, LLC Announces Investigation of Domo, Inc. (DOMO)

    NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / September 11, 2019 / Bronstein, Gewirtz & Grossman, LLC is investigating potential claims on behalf of purchasers of Domo, Inc. (“ Domo ” or the “Company”) (NASDAQ:DOMO). Such ...

  • GlobeNewswire

    SHAREHOLDER ALERT: Pomerantz Law Firm Investigates Claims On Behalf of Investors of Domo, Inc. – DOMO

    NEW YORK, Sept. 11, 2019 -- Pomerantz LLP is investigating claims on behalf of investors of Domo, Inc. (“Domo” or the “Company”) (NASDAQ: DOMO).  Such investors are advised to.

  • TheStreet.com

    Domo Climbs After CEO Buys $1 Million of Shares

    Shares of cloud-based communication platform Domo were rising Wednesday after CEO Joshua James bought 60,000 shares of the company at an average price of $17 a share. Last week, shares of Domo dropped after the company reported a fiscal second-quarter loss that was narrower than analysts' forecasts but revenue that came up short, and issued and a less-rosy outlook for fiscal 2020.

  • GuruFocus.com

    Domo Inc (DOMO) Founder, CEO and Chairman Joshua G James Bought $1 million of Shares

    Founder, CEO and Chairman of Domo Inc (30-Year Financial, Insider Trades) Joshua G James (insider trades) bought 60,000 shares of DOMO on 09/10/2019 at an average price of $17 a share. Continue reading...

  • Why PagerDuty, Domo, and Slack Technologies Slumped Today
    Motley Fool

    Why PagerDuty, Domo, and Slack Technologies Slumped Today

    Even on a solid day for the markets, earnings troubles hit some stocks.

  • Why Domo Stock Got Utterly Destroyed Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Domo Stock Got Utterly Destroyed Today

    Second-quarter results met or beat expectations, but Domo cut its full-year guidance.

  • Pass the Antacids for Cloud Software Stocks
    Bloomberg

    Pass the Antacids for Cloud Software Stocks

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- How do you feel about roller coasters? The nauseating jolt of a theme park ride is a useful metaphor for stock prices of young software companies this week. The stock prices of recently public Slack Technologies Inc., PagerDuty Inc. and CrowdStrike Holdings Inc. were punished after what seemed to be good or great earnings reports. But that volatility is the price of valuations that reached stratospheric levels. Shares of CrowdStrike, a cybersecurity software company, were down about 8% on Friday after it said fiscal second-quarter revenue nearly doubled from a year ago and it raised its annual forecast. That seems like good news, but it appeared there were some worries that CrowdStrike didn’t exceed its own revenue guidance by leaps and bounds.It was a similar story for PagerDuty, Zoom Video Communications Inc. and Slack this week, when healthy growth and optimistic forecasts caused at least temporary stock sell-offs. Another cloud software company, Domo Inc., reported lackluster sales gains and a worse-than-expected outlook on Thursday, and its shares were down 32% in early trading Friday.The share prices of Slack and the other software highfliers were destined for wild swings. Stock buyers are gung ho for fast-growing young companies that sell cloud software to businesses and are paying upward of $20 or more for each dollar of expected revenue. For comparison, the median of more than 150 software firms is less than $5 for each dollar of expected revenue, Bloomberg data show.With heady share prices of young business software firms, it is inevitable that any tiny blemish risks a sell-off. That’s the high price of a high-priced stock. There are understandable reasons for investors’ willingness to pay unprecedented sums to own these relatively young business software firms. Companies like Slack, Atlassian or Veeva Systems charge companies a subscription fee to access software that can make salespeople more efficient, help cubicle workers collaborate with colleagues or automate rote tasks for information technology departments. Companies come to rely on the useful software, and the annuity-like subscription business model makes investors believe they can plot sales growing to the moon at rich profit margins. I am not yet convinced that these young software companies can grow large enough to justify the enthusiasm of their investors, particularly if an economic downturn forces companies to rationalize their technology budgets. Something real is definitely happening with software that improves companies’ or their workers’ performance, but the question as always is whether investors are paying the right price. The cost of richly valued companies’ volatile share prices isn’t measured only in antacid. Stock swings can also make a company structurally vulnerable. A few years ago, there was a mini wave of M&A activity after uneven earnings results cratered companies’ share prices and made them ripe for takeovers.That’s what happened to LinkedIn, when a bad quarter and the resulting 50% wipeout in its share price invited Microsoft and other suitors to come knocking. On the flip side, high valuations for some young software companies may be a barrier to necessary consolidation in the category. Slack, Zoom Video and CrowdStrike went public in recent months, and it takes times for valuations to settle for such recently public companies. All signs, however, are that the top-tier of cloud software companies will remain richly valued. And that brings with it the thrills and potential spills of a roller coaster. To contact the author of this story: Shira Ovide at sovide@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Shira Ovide is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. She previously was a reporter for the Wall Street Journal.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Schaeffer's Investment Research

    Domo Stock Options in High Demand After Forecast Flop

    DOMO stock is headed for its biggest one-day drop ever

  • Domo (DOMO) Q2 Loss Narrower Than Expected, Revenues Rise Y/Y
    Zacks

    Domo (DOMO) Q2 Loss Narrower Than Expected, Revenues Rise Y/Y

    Domo's (DOMO) second-quarter fiscal 2020 results benefit from solid portfolio, expanding partner base and new customer wins.

  • Domo still can’t explain what it actually is, and the stock is getting killed
    MarketWatch

    Domo still can’t explain what it actually is, and the stock is getting killed

    When Domo Inc. went public last year, it was hard to discern what the company actually does, and how executives were going to turn it into a big business. Slightly more than a year later, Domo is showing why that should have scared investors away in the initial public offering.

  • TheStreet.com

    [video]Domo Plunges on Revenue Miss, Guidance Cut

    The cloud software company reports a fiscal second-quarter loss narrower than analysts' forecasts but revenue that comes up short and a less-rosy outlook for fiscal 2020.

  • Domo Inc (DOMO) Q2 2020 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Domo Inc (DOMO) Q2 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

    DOMO earnings call for the period ending July 31, 2019.

  • Domo, Inc. (DOMO) Reports Q2 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates
    Zacks

    Domo, Inc. (DOMO) Reports Q2 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates

    Domo, Inc. (DOMO) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 4.00% and 1.12%, respectively, for the quarter ended July 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?