FB - Facebook, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
220.96
-1.18 (-0.53%)
As of 2:41PM EST. Market open.
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Previous Close222.14
Open222.15
Bid221.01 x 1200
Ask221.04 x 800
Day's Range219.12 - 222.37
52 Week Range142.52 - 222.63
Volume8,969,097
Avg. Volume13,700,551
Market Cap630.116B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.06
PE Ratio (TTM)35.32
EPS (TTM)6.26
Earnings DateJan 28, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est243.82
  • Facebook speeds up AI training by culling the weak
    TechCrunch

    Facebook speeds up AI training by culling the weak

    In order to better create these potentially useful systems, Facebook engineers derived huge efficiency benefits from, essentially, leaving the slowest of the pack behind. It's part of the company's new focus on "embodied AI," meaning machine learning systems that interact intelligently with their surroundings. Exactly why Facebook is so interested in that I'll leave to your own speculation, but the fact is they've recruited and funded serious researchers to look into this and related domains of AI work.

  • Positive Advertising Outlook May Push Facebook Stock Even Higher
    Investor's Business Daily

    Positive Advertising Outlook May Push Facebook Stock Even Higher

    Seeing an expanding runway for online advertising growth, a Wall Street equity analyst on Tuesday raised his price target on Facebook stock and maintained the equivalent of a buy rating.

  • Barrons.com

    Facebook Stock Will Rise Because of Instagram’s Stellar Growth, Analyst Says

    Facebook shares rose 57% last year, but Morgan Stanley sees significant gains still to come. The firm expects Instagram’s revenue to grow 150% year over year.

  • Apple has soared out of the value realm, but you may still be able to find success on this stock list
    MarketWatch

    Apple has soared out of the value realm, but you may still be able to find success on this stock list

    DEEP DIVE It’s happening again: The financial media is touting a potential shifting of investors to value stocks from the growth stocks that have propelled the extended bull market in the U.S. This last happened in September and October, though the value buzz ended up being short-lived.

  • The biggest question looming over tech: Is the cloud boom over?
    MarketWatch

    The biggest question looming over tech: Is the cloud boom over?

    More than 20 years after the first documented usage of the term “cloud computing,” the first cracks appeared in the spending patterns of big data center build-out by public cloud companies.

  • Are the FAANG Stocks too Hot to Handle This Earnings Season?
    Zacks

    Are the FAANG Stocks too Hot to Handle This Earnings Season?

    The FAANG stocks are back in the spotlight this earnings season but not all of them have stellar charts. Who has the best earnings chart of the group?

  • Suicide Research Could Be the Mortality Breakthrough of the 2020s
    Bloomberg

    Suicide Research Could Be the Mortality Breakthrough of the 2020s

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- What’s the medical breakthrough that could save the most lives in the U.S. over the next ten years? In the 2020s, medical research will likely inch forward when it comes to major killers like heart disease and cancer. But the biggest potential to save lives could lie in learning to prevent suicide.The rates of reported suicides have been creeping up over the last two decades. Even more disturbingly, CDC reports that the suicide death rate for teens increased 56% between 2007 and 2017. Rising suicide rates might be a result of many things — rising levels of despair, the opioid epidemic, greater access to guns, even the proliferation of Internet groups that offer people advice on how to kill themselves. It could also be that more people are reporting suicides instead of concealing such deaths as accidents.It’s a surprisingly common form of death — more prevalent than homicide or automobile accidents. Unlike cancer and heart disease, which are leading causes of death among the old, suicide robs people of decades of life. According to CDC statistics, it is the second most prevalent cause of death, after accidents, for people between 10 and 34 and fourth for people between 34 and 54.Because it hasn’t been all that thoroughly studied as a medical problem, there’s room to cut down on that death toll even without any remarkable technological breakthrough. A streamlined three-digit suicide hotline number, approved last month by FCC, could become one of the great public health measures of the century. Further out on the frontier, researchers are having some success using artificial intelligence to identify suicidal people — those whose lives might be saved by talk therapy or drugs.John Pestian, director of the computational medicine center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, explains that there are different kinds of suicides. Some are driven primarily by chronic mental illness, while others are more impulsive. Those with chronic mental illness may make repeated attempts. People have a powerful instinct to live, he says, and for their psychological pain to override this, it must be incredibly intense. He’s hoping to help such people through pharmacogenomics — finding drugs that will ease their chronic emotional pain.The more impulsive cases are simpler to prevent — think of the teenager whose boyfriend or girlfriend just left, or a Wall Street trader who lost all his money, he says. If someone is going through an acute crisis and wants to jump out a window, the right words spoken at the right time might be the only treatment needed to save a life.Renowned suicide researcher Edwin Schneidman writes in “The Suicidal Mind” that therapists can help people in this state by getting them to consider alternatives besides killing themselves — helping them see that that they have choices. He describes how he helped a suicidal college student who felt hopeless after she found out she was pregnant. He got her to consider which of her options was least terrible, and she recovered.In the memorable 2003 New Yorker story “Jumpers”, Tad Friend describes conversations with several people who survived after jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. They told him that they recognized their mistake before they hit the water: “I instantly realized that everything in my life that I’d thought was unfixable was totally fixable — except for having just jumped,” one said. Another left a note saying ‘I’m going to walk to the bridge. If one person smiles at me on the way, I will not jump.’ ”To learn more about the reasons people decide to take their own lives, Pestian and other researchers are amassing troves of data. Right now, he says, he has the biggest collection of suicide notes in the country, as well as samples of speech and body language from suicidal patients. There are clues in these that therapists can look for — and patterns that algorithms can use to identify those most at risk.He says suicide hotlines are crucial, and he approves of the idea of amending the current one, created in 2005, from the usual ten digits to just three: 988. Even so, it’s not quite as simple as it sounds, he says: there will also have to be the right kinds of resources at the other end of the line.According to one news story, an FCC committee estimated that those resources would cost $570 million in the first year and $175 million the next. This is pocket change compared to, say, routine mammography, which costs Americans billions and the value of which has been called into question.As for AI, using algorithms to predict anyone’s behavior can sound scary — especially the use of systems that attempt to label Facebook users as suicidal from their posts, or others that gather data from users’ smartphones. But Pestian convinced me that there’s potential for AI to do much good in the area of suicide, as long as it’s only used to support human decision-making, and humans don’t delegate the decision making to machines.He has developed algorithms that work with what he calls sentiment data – acoustic, visual or language patterns that differ between the suicidal and non-suicidal. In a paper published in 2016 in the journal “Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior,” he applied an algorithm to interviews with a sample of 379 people, some known to be suicidal, some diagnosed with mental illness but not suicidal, and a healthy control group. The algorithm used speech, facial expressions and body language to identify the suicidal group with 85% accuracy.That’s not perfect, but it’s better than doctors can do. Pestian has recently gotten a contract with Oak Ridge National Laboratory to apply AI to the rampant problem of suicide among veterans. According to a report from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, more than 6,000 veterans die by suicide every year — a rate 50% higher than that in the general adult population.We may not know the reason for the rising suicide rate, but we do know it is killing too many people — and that those deaths ought to be preventable. While science has a pretty detailed understanding of cancer and heart problems, suicide was studied by relatively few researchers until recently. It’s good news that we’re finally starting to learn more.  To contact the author of this story: Faye Flam at fflam1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sarah Green Carmichael at sgreencarmic@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Faye Flam is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. She has written for the Economist, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Psychology Today, Science and other publications. She has a degree in geophysics from the California Institute of Technology.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Facebook to add 1,000 tech and content jobs in the U.K.
    MarketWatch

    Facebook to add 1,000 tech and content jobs in the U.K.

    Facebook (FB)  said Tuesday it plans to hire 1,000 more staff in Britain, mainly for its technology and harmful content teams. More than half of the new jobs will be in technology-focused roles such as software engineering. There will also be a “large number” of jobs working on building tools to detect and remove harmful content from Facebook and its other platforms, which include WhatsApp, Messenger and Instagram.

  • Trump-Macron Truce Averts Brewing Trade War: A Brief Solace?
    Zacks

    Trump-Macron Truce Averts Brewing Trade War: A Brief Solace?

    The trade truce staves a bigger trade war that could have significant geopolitical and economic ramifications.

  • Will FAANGs Have Enough Bite This Earnings Season?
    Zacks

    Will FAANGs Have Enough Bite This Earnings Season?

    FAANG's huge market value determines broader stock market movements, and any let-downs in their quarterly earnings report will surely have far-reaching implications.

  • Bloomberg

    Trump’s French Trade Truce Only Puts Off the Battle

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Who said Davos doesn’t make a difference? As world leaders, business executives and cheerleaders for the planet descended on the Swiss resort for the annual World Economic Forum, one diplomatic victory was being chalked up on the sidelines: A presidential truce between Donald Trump and Emmanuel Macron over France’s plan to tax tech companies, which the U.S. says discriminates against its national champions.After threats of retaliatory trade tariffs on both sides, Macron took to Twitter to declare a “great” discussion with Trump that would lead to a “good agreement” on de-escalation. Trump retweeted that assessment, responding in the affirmative with “excellent!” But it’s hard to see much worth celebrating yet.What this truce amounts to isn’t exactly clear, for one thing, and it’s certainly not being trumpeted in the way that Trump’s “beautiful monster” of a phase-one deal with China was last week. Avoiding an escalation of tariffs is obviously a good thing. But Trump has already leveled so many trade threats at France and the European Union — driven by hatred of the trade surpluses they run with the U.S. — that it’s hard to feel excited at the prospect of one less gun barrel. If Trump actually ends up retracting his specific threat to hit $2.4 billion of French products with tariffs, that still doesn’t automatically guarantee protection for Airbus aircraft or German cars.It’s also not clear what Macron has gifted Trump in order to get de-escalation onto the agenda. According to the Wall Street Journal, France may have simply offered to “pause” its tech tax until a worldwide solution is agreed upon by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development — where support from the U.S. is obviously crucial. That’s not as huge a climb down as it initially seems: Paris could feasibly suspend the collection of digital tax payments due in April without scrapping the principle or the structure of its tax, as my Bloomberg News colleagues write elsewhere. But it still looks like Trump’s threats have paid off on one level.If the original sin is that today’s tech giants — Google parent Alphabet Inc., Facebook Inc., Amazon.com Inc. — aren’t paying their fair share in tax, we seem to be veering a long way from absolution. Things would be different if Europe could set aside its differences and agree on the fundamental good that a digital tax across its 28 members (soon to be 27) would bring. Brussels estimates global tech firms pay an average tax rate of 9.5%, compared with 23.2% for bricks-and-mortar peers. But the EU is divided on the need to overhaul the data economy, with low-tax jurisdictions like Ireland and the Netherlands resisting a common levy on digital firms.The Trump administration has shown itself adept at exploiting these divisions. France’s move to go it alone with a digital tax was politically popular, but fiscally weak. It is only expected to bring in 500 million euros ($555 million) a year, a digital drop in the ocean of France’s approximately 80 billion-euro deficit. Despite being fundamentally righteous, it allowed Trump to poke the soft underbelly of European unity by training his tariff weapon on Paris — and confronted the Macron administration with the prospect of pain for key exporters. The U.S. trade deficit with France was $16.2 billion in 2018.The pressure is now on to get consensus among more than 135 countries in the OECD-led push for an agreement on how to tax digital profits. It’s a solution favored by the likes of Apple Inc.’s Tim Cook, which speaks to how companies prefer the predictability of global solutions over patchy national ones. But until such a solution is actually agreed, it will be hard to celebrate this latest Franco-American “truce.” It has allowed France and Europe to save face by avoiding the reality of a new trade confrontation with Trump as he fights for re-election. It has offered tech firms a way to save money. But it hasn’t really saved the world from the threat of more trade wars. Davos can’t achieve everything.To contact the author of this story: Lionel Laurent at llaurent2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Lionel Laurent is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Brussels. He previously worked at Reuters and Forbes.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Market Exclusive

    Market Morning: Biden v Facebook, Idahoans Splurge in Oregon, BoJo Threatens the Axe,

    Biden Can’t Abide Facebook Joe Biden is going after Facebook (NASDAQ:FB). He wants to get rid of a law that protects Facebook and other social media sites from liability for posts by its users. This would mean that Facebook could potentially be sued by anyone who claims that a post on Facebook caused or was […]The post Market Morning: Biden v Facebook, Idahoans Splurge in Oregon, BoJo Threatens the Axe, appeared first on Market Exclusive.

  • Benzinga

    Facebook To Hire 1,000 Employees To UK Office As It Gets Clarity Over Brexit

    Facebook Inc. (NASDAQ: FB ) is hiring another 1,000 employees in its UK offices, Reuters reported on Monday. What Happened The California-based social media behemoth will hire across different departments, ...

  • IBM Proposes Artificial Intelligence Rules to Ease Bias Concerns
    Bloomberg

    IBM Proposes Artificial Intelligence Rules to Ease Bias Concerns

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to receive the Davos Diary, a special daily newsletter that will run from Jan. 20-24.IBM called for rules aimed at eliminating bias in artificial intelligence to ease concerns that the technology relies on data that bakes in past discriminatory practices and could harm women, minorities, the disabled, older Americans and others.As it seeks to define a growing debate in the U.S. and Europe over how to regulate the burgeoning industry, IBM urged industry and governments to jointly develop standards to measure and combat potential discrimination.The Armonk, New York-based company issued policy proposals Tuesday ahead of a Wednesday panel on AI to be led by Chief Executive Officer Ginni Rometty on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum in Davos. The initiative is designed to find a consensus on rules that may be stricter than what industry alone might produce, but that are less stringent than what governments might impose on their own.“It seems pretty clear to us that government regulation of artificial intelligence is the next frontier in tech policy regulation,” said Chris Padilla, vice president of government and regulatory affairs at International Business Machines Corp.The 108-year-old company, once a world technology leader, has lagged behind the sector for years. In its fight to remain relevant, IBM has pegged its future on newer technologies like artificial intelligence and cloud services. But it’s yet to show significant revenue growth from those areas.The IBM recommendations call for companies to work with governments to develop standards on how to make sure, for instance, that African-Americans are guaranteed fair access to housing despite algorithms that rely on historical data such as zip codes or mortgage rates that may have been skewed by discrimination. In the U.S., that would likely occur through the National Institute of Standards and Technology within the U.S. Department of Commerce.Read more: A QuickTake explains algorithmic biasRometty is hosting the panel, which includes a top White House aide, Chris Liddell, OECD Secretary-General Jose Angel Gurria and Siemens AG CEO Joe Kaeser.IBM also suggests that companies appoint chief AI ethics officials, carry out assessments to determine how much harm an AI system may pose and maintain documentation about data when “making determinations or recommendations with potentially significant implications for individuals” so that the decisions can be explained.Spearheading the AI regulatory debate gives IBM a chance to come back into the spotlight as a leader in cutting-edge technology, a position it hasn’t held for years.The AI proposals are intended to stave off potential crises that could enrage customers, lawmakers and regulators worldwide -- similar to what happened with Facebook Inc. in the Cambridge Analytica data scandal, when the personal data of millions of Americans was transferred to the political consulting firm without their knowledge.“I don’t think we’re yet in the same place on AI,” he said. “So I don’t think it’s too late to try this approach.”Concerns about AI and machine learning -- software tools that use existing data to automate future analysis and decision-making -- range from identifying faces in security-camera footage to making determinations about mortgage rates. AI is central to the future of many technology companies, including IBM’s, but has spurred worries that it could kill jobs and spread existing disparities in areas such as law enforcement, access to credit and hiring.IBM has been working with the Trump administration since last summer on its approach to AI regulation. Earlier this month, the White House issued guidelines for use of the technology by federal agencies, which emphasized a desire not to impose burdensome controls. Last week, a bipartisan group of U.S. senators unveiled a bill designed to boost private and public funding for AI and other industries of the future.The European Union is considering new, legally binding requirements for developers of artificial intelligence to ensure the technology is developed and used in an ethical way. IBM advised a European committee of academics, experts and executives that recommended avoiding unnecessarily prescriptive rules.The EU’s executive arm is set to propose that the new rules apply to “high-risk sectors,” such as health care and transport. It also may suggest that the bloc update safety and liability laws, according to a draft of a so-called white paper on artificial intelligence obtained by Bloomberg. The European Commission is due to unveil the paper in mid-February and the final version is likely to change.For More: Europe Mulls New Tougher Rules for Artificial IntelligenceWhile Rometty has touted the growth potential for new offerings in cloud services, the company’s third-quarter earnings report in October missed Wall Street estimates. It was IBM’s fifth-consecutive quarter of shrinking sales despite its July acquisition of open-source software provider Red Hat, designed to bolster its hybrid cloud-services strategy. The company is set to report fourth-quarter results Tuesday at the market close.Padilla said compliance with standards could become a selling-point for companies and perhaps help lower their legal liability.“If we take a just-say-no approach, or we just wait, the chances are higher that governments will react to something that happens,” he said. “Then you will get more of a prescriptive, top-down regulation.”\--With assistance from Natalia Drozdiak.To contact the reporters on this story: Ben Brody in Washington, D.C. at btenerellabr@bloomberg.net;Olivia Carville in New York at ocarville1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, Paula DwyerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Facebook targets UK growth with 1,000 hires this year
    Reuters

    Facebook targets UK growth with 1,000 hires this year

    Facebook will hire 1,000 people in London this year in roles such as product development and safety as it continues to grow its biggest engineering center outside the United States after Britain leaves the European Union. Over half of the new jobs will be in technology, including software engineering and data science, Facebook's vice president for Europe, the Middle East and Africa Nicola Mendelsohn said in an interview. Other roles will be in the "community integrity" team, which makes products to detect and remove harmful content from platforms like Facebook, Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp.

  • Barrons.com

    It’s Time for Netflix to Consider Ads, Investor Says

    A portfolio manager says the time has come for Netflix to consider an advertising-supported version of its popular streaming service.

  • We're getting better at protecting elections: Facebook's Clegg
    Reuters

    We're getting better at protecting elections: Facebook's Clegg

    Facebook will do a better job of preventing bad actors from abusing its platform to manipulate this year's U.S. presidential election than it did four years ago, its public affairs chief Nick Clegg said on Monday. Facing a critical audience at a technology conference in Munich, Clegg, a British former deputy prime minister hired by Facebook in 2018, said interference by Russian and other operatives in the 2016 vote had "shocked everybody". "We are getting better and better at protecting elections from foreign interference," Clegg told the DLD technology conference.

  • We're getting better at protecting elections - Facebook's Clegg
    Reuters

    We're getting better at protecting elections - Facebook's Clegg

    Facebook will do a better job of preventing bad actors from abusing its platform to manipulate this year's U.S. presidential election than it did four years ago, its public affairs chief Nick Clegg said on Monday. Facing a critical audience at a technology conference in Munich, Clegg, a British former deputy prime minister hired by Facebook in 2018, said interference by Russian and other operatives in the 2016 vote had "shocked everybody". "We are getting better and better at protecting elections from foreign interference," Clegg told the DLD technology conference.

  • Bloomberg

    Amazon Executive Challenges Facebook’s Clegg on User Privacy

    (Bloomberg) -- A senior Amazon.com Inc. executive used a conference in Munich to challenge Facebook Inc.’s record in protecting users’ privacy.“If you don’t pay for the product, you are the product,” Werner Vogels, Amazon’s chief technology officer told Nick Clegg, Facebook’s vice president for global affairs and communications, at the Digital Life Design conference on Monday.Standing in the audience, Vogels -- who introduced himself as working for a “small bookshop” -- asked Clegg how Facebook could claim to protect users if many weren’t aware of how their data is being used.“I think there are things Facebook could do,” to make its relationship with users more explicit, Clegg responded. “Unlike you, I believe an advertising business model where the user doesn’t have to pay is a very ingenious and good thing.”Both companies have come under scrutiny for violating users’ privacy. Speakers using Amazon’s Alexa virtual-assistant collected audio snippets from users and played them to employees hired to help train its voice-recognition software, Bloomberg has reported. Amazon has said that it takes privacy seriously and that select employees listen to only a very small fraction of Alexa requests to improve the service.Read more: Silicon Valley Is Listening to Your Most Intimate MomentsFacebook has come under fire for giving third-parties access to user data, particularly in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Last year, it agreed to pay a record $5 billion fine to the Federal Trade Commission to settle an investigation stemming from that controversy, where an outside researcher collected personal data on tens of millions of Facebook users without their consent, and then sold that data to a consultancy working with Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.To contact the reporters on this story: Sarah Syed in London at ssyed35@bloomberg.net;Oliver Sachgau in Munich at osachgau@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Amy Thomson, Thomas PfeifferFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Amazon Twitch's Viewership Falls: GOOGL, MSFT & FB Gear Up
    Zacks

    Amazon Twitch's Viewership Falls: GOOGL, MSFT & FB Gear Up

    Amazon (AMZN) Twitch witnesses decline in viewer base in fourth-quarter 2019 on account of losing popular streamers to Alphabet, Microsoft and Facebook.