HOG - Harley-Davidson, Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
34.64
-0.26 (-0.74%)
At close: 4:03PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close34.90
Open34.72
Bid34.62 x 1300
Ask34.63 x 800
Day's Range34.26 - 34.73
52 Week Range31.36 - 46.22
Volume849,636
Avg. Volume2,033,831
Market Cap5.445B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.34
PE Ratio (TTM)11.73
EPS (TTM)2.95
Earnings DateJul 22, 2019 - Jul 26, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield1.50 (4.58%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-05-29
1y Target Est38.92
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Struggling legend Harley-Davidson fights for a slice of India's massive motorcycle market
    CNBC Videos16 days ago

    Struggling legend Harley-Davidson fights for a slice of India's massive motorcycle market

    Harley-Davidson may be the biggest name in American motorcycles, but the U.S. market is aging and shrinking. The massive and growing markets of India and southeast Asia offer hope. But the legendary maker of big iron 'hogs' faces fierce competition and needs to make smaller and cheaper bikes that its most loyal fans might not recognize.

  • Top Trending: Mueller Breaks Silence, Harley-Davidson ends production in Kansas City, video game addiction
    Yahoo Finance Video18 days ago

    Top Trending: Mueller Breaks Silence, Harley-Davidson ends production in Kansas City, video game addiction

    Yahoo Finance's Adam Shapiro brings you today's trending stories.

  • Harley-Davidson CEO Matt Levatich on trade, electric bikes and more
    CNBC Videos27 days ago

    Harley-Davidson CEO Matt Levatich on trade, electric bikes and more

    Harley-Davidson CEO Matt Levatich joins "Squawk Alley" to discuss the impact of the U.S.-China trade dispute, the company's electric bike and more.

  • Harley-Davidson Museum featured on Amazon Prime show
    American City Business Journals4 days ago

    Harley-Davidson Museum featured on Amazon Prime show

    The Harley-Davidson Museum was chosen for the second season based on viewer requests, the show's producer said.

  • Harley-Davidson CEO talks about countering tariffs with Thailand plant and on going quiet with LiveWire
    American City Business Journals5 days ago

    Harley-Davidson CEO talks about countering tariffs with Thailand plant and on going quiet with LiveWire

    Harley-Davidson looks to avoid high European tariffs with its plant in Thailand and to increase ridership with new electric bikes.

  • Harley-Davidson partners with rock icons The Rolling Stones
    American City Business Journals10 days ago

    Harley-Davidson partners with rock icons The Rolling Stones

    Harley-Davidson earlier this week announced a new, limited-edition collection of shirts that combine the Rolling Stones and Harley-Davidson brands.

  • Why Harley-Davidson Stock Fell 12.1% Last Month
    Motley Fool10 days ago

    Why Harley-Davidson Stock Fell 12.1% Last Month

    Not a lot is going right for Harley-Davidson these days.

  • Is There An Opportunity With Harley-Davidson, Inc.'s (NYSE:HOG) 45% Undervaluation?
    Simply Wall St.11 days ago

    Is There An Opportunity With Harley-Davidson, Inc.'s (NYSE:HOG) 45% Undervaluation?

    In this article we are going to estimate the intrinsic value of Harley-Davidson, Inc. (NYSE:HOG) by estimating the...

  • Barrons.com12 days ago

    Harley-Davidson Sales Could Have Slipped in April and May from March, Analyst Says

    Wedbush’s James Hardiman wrote in a note to clients Tuesday that retail sales strength in March proved “unsustainable.” Hardiman wrote that his dealer contacts saw “flattish” sales in April, followed by mid-single-digit declines in May.

  • Where U.S. Tariffs Stand Now After Trump Mexico Tweet
    InvestorPlace16 days ago

    Where U.S. Tariffs Stand Now After Trump Mexico Tweet

    Tariffs are back in the news in a big way. President Donald Trump announced on Thursday -- via Twitter (NYSE:TWTR), naturally -- a 5% tariff on all goods entering the U.S. from Mexico. Mexican stocks fell on the news, with the iShares MSCI Mexico ETF (NYSEARCA:EWW) falling nearly 4% in early trading Friday. EU stocks tumbled overnight, though Chinese stocks, perhaps surprisingly, have held up somewhat well.Source: Shutterstock The new tariffs on Mexico -- which are slated to rise unless or until the country significantly slows migration into the U.S. -- are among several imposed by the Trump Administration. And while the various tariffs have made news, their impact on investors so far has been relatively muted.The fear now, as equities worldwide selloff, is that the new front on the trade war will be one too far. U.S. GDP projections for the second quarter have come down to a median estimate of 1.6%. China's economy likely is taking a hit. Growth in the Eurozone continues to be stagnant. There's certainly a sense that both a precarious global economy and wobbly equity markets could tip with the slightest push.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsIn that context, it's worth understanding Thursday's news in the context of tariffs imposed so far. The new tariffs on Mexican goods aren't the biggest ones imposed -- yet.But that doesn't mean they won't be the most important or the most damaging. Trump Tariffs So FarIt took just over one year for the Trump Administration to start playing the tariff card. In January 2018, the U.S. imposed levies on solar panels (at a 30% rate) and washing machines (20%), citing significant injury to domestic producers. Those tariffs weren't targeted at China in particular, but given that the rising Asian giant manufactures the majority of the world's solar panels, China felt the biggest hit. * 10 Heavily Shorted Stocks to Sell -- Because the Bears Are Right Less than six weeks later, the Administration added steel and aluminum to the list. Four countries -- South Korea, Argentina, Australia and Brazil -- received permanent exemptions. The European Union, Mexico, and Canada were excluded on a temporary basis to allow for bilateral negotiations. On June 1, 2018, however, those countries were included as well. As part of negotiations over the USMCA (United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement), this month tariffs were removed from Mexican and Canadian imports.From that point, the focus turned to China. China had retaliated against the steel and aluminum levies with tariffs of its own. In May 2018, both countries agreed to put the trade war on hold to continue negotiations. When talks failed, the US implemented new tariffs on some $50 billion of goods in two separate moves.In September, the U.S. added another $200 billion in goods to the list, at a 10% rate that would rise to 25% by January 1, 2019. China again retaliated; a pause again was declared in December. Talks failed once more. The U.S., adhering to a deadline it had set, raised the rate to 25% in early May.Then, this week, Trump announced the 5% levy on all Mexican goods. That rate, too, could rise to 25% if the Mexican government doesn't meet unspecified, vague goals. Where We Sit NowFor all the noise about tariffs over the past eighteen months, it's mostly U.S.-China trade that is affected. The U.S. has levied tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods; China, in turn, has targeted $110 billion in U.S. products.The USMCA negotiations had led to the lifting of retaliatory tariffs by Canada and Mexico. Whether that will hold amid the new levies on Mexican imports remains to be seen. In the meantime, Mexico will see a 5% tariff beginning in July that will rise 5% each month through October to a potential maximum of 25%.The European Union has added its own tariffs on automobiles and motorcycles, which most notably have hit U.S. manufacturer Harley-Davidson (NYSE:HOG). There, too, talks appear to have broken down. Both sides additionally continue to argue over alleged airline subsidies, part of the broader battle between Boeing (NYSE:BA) and Airbus (OTCMKTS:EADSY).Admittedly, in the context of the global economy -- roughly $88 trillion in GDP -- even 25% tariffs on less than half a trillion dollars' worth of goods seems relatively minimal. Most countries have no part in the trade war. And hopes persist that the U.S., in particular, can negotiate new deals -- or back off from an escalating game of chicken.But in an interconnected world, tariffs can cause disruption. And at least on Friday, investors clearly are showing their discomfort with the surprise move toward Mexican products. Is This an Overreaction?It is worth pointing out that, for all the noise, tariffs haven't really impacted equities all that much. Chinese stocks clearly have taken a hit. Big names like Alibaba (NYSE:BABA) and Tencent Holdings (OTCMKTS:TCEHY) declined sharply toward the end of last year, and have weakened again of late. For Chinese plays, there's been a clear correlation between trade sentiment and stock prices.But elsewhere, the impact of tariffs on equities has been muted. EU stocks, using the Euro Stoxx 50 index, have rallied since Trump's election despite weak domestic economies. Even Mexican stocks are essentially flat. US equities occasionally have been shaky but have performed even more strongly.So far, trade wars and tariffs haven't really hit stocks. The December dip -- driven in part by trade concerns -- proved to be a buying opportunity. It's possible that recent declines may prove to be the same.But the broader, deeper fear is that even a seemingly small 5% tariff winds up being one step too far. The imposition of levies on Mexico during USMCA talks has raised questions about whether China can negotiate with a rival who may change its policy on a whim.The U.S. presidential election now is less than 18 months away; Trump's re-election prospects are roughly 50/50 at the moment, at least per betting markets. Might trade partners choose to simply wait out the current Administration in hopes of finding a new, more trade-friendly, replacement? * 7 Stocks to Buy for Monster Growth If tariff hikes continue through early 2021, equity markets are going to feel pressure. And some investors clearly are looking to get out ahead of that eventuality. It remains to be seen whether that's prudence, or an overreaction.As of this writing, Vince Martin has no positions in any securities mentioned. More From InvestorPlace * 4 Top American Penny Pot Stocks (Buy Before June 21) * 7 Stocks to Buy for Monster Growth * Ranking the Top 10 Stock Buybacks of Last Year * 5 Stocks Under $10 With Big Upside Potential Compare Brokers The post Where U.S. Tariffs Stand Now After Trump Mexico Tweet appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Barrons.com17 days ago

    Harley-Davidson Shares Can Double: Fund Manager

    The company operates in an industry undergoing a major structural shift due to a mismatch of preferences between generations. This has a direct impact on the company’s top line, which has been flat for the last 10 years, resulting in margin compression. The management seems to be acutely aware of what is happening, having put in motion a comprehensive business restructuring plan aimed at catapulting Harley-Davidson back to growth.

  • Moody's17 days ago

    Harley-Davidson Financial Services, Inc. -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Harley-Davidson, Inc.

    Announcement of Periodic Review: Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Harley-Davidson, Inc. New York, May 30, 2019 -- Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of Harley-Davidson, Inc. and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. The review was conducted through a portfolio review in which Moody's reassessed the appropriateness of the ratings in the context of the relevant principal methodology(ies), recent developments, and a comparison of the financial and operating profile to similarly rated peers.

  • Auto Stock Roundup: Fiat-Renault Merger Plan, Toyota's Investment in Ride-Sharing Firm
    Zacks17 days ago

    Auto Stock Roundup: Fiat-Renault Merger Plan, Toyota's Investment in Ride-Sharing Firm

    Fiat Chrysler (FCAU) wishes to collaborate with Renault (RNLSY) for floating the third leading auto giant in the world. Toyota (TM) mulls over investing around $550 million in a ride-hailing start-up.

  • Harley-Davidson (HOG) Shuts Production at Kansas City Factory
    Zacks18 days ago

    Harley-Davidson (HOG) Shuts Production at Kansas City Factory

    The closure of the Kansas City factory by Harley-Davidson (HOG) results in 800 job losses.

  • Harley-Davidson ends production at Kansas City plant
    American City Business Journals19 days ago

    Harley-Davidson ends production at Kansas City plant

    The factory's closure, which was announced in January 2018, resulted in the loss of about 800 jobs.

  • TheStreet.com22 days ago

    Harley-Davidson: Riding Into History on the Back of a H.O.G.

    What is it about Harley-Davidson that evokes so much nostalgia? Maybe it's the throaty sound of the engine, the sleek lines or its classic colors. Watch the video for a video timeline of the iconic company ...

  • Why Is Harley-Davidson (HOG) Down 6.9% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks24 days ago

    Why Is Harley-Davidson (HOG) Down 6.9% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Harley-Davidson (HOG) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Harley-Davidson's Levatich brings LiveWire to CNBC, says firm unhurt by Trump crusade
    American City Business Journals25 days ago

    Harley-Davidson's Levatich brings LiveWire to CNBC, says firm unhurt by Trump crusade

    Matt Levatich discussed the Milwaukee motorcycle company's plans to reach new and established customers with electric vehicles, but also candidly discussed the company's struggle with retaliatory tariffs in the European Union and the controversy created by Trump's comments.

  • Harley-Davidson, Inc. (NYSE:HOG) Has Attractive Fundamentals
    Simply Wall St.26 days ago

    Harley-Davidson, Inc. (NYSE:HOG) Has Attractive Fundamentals

    Want to participate in a short research study? Help shape the future of investing tools and you could win a $250 gift...

  • CNBC27 days ago

    Harley CEO on Trump trade war: 'Obviously we can't sit by and wait for something to happen'

    Harley was thrown into the spotlight of Trump's trade war last June. The EU tariffs are costing the Wisconsin-based motorcycle manufacturer about $100 million a year, CEO Matt Levatich said. The EU smacked duties on $2.4 billion worth of U.S. products after Trump levied tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Europe last year.

  • Barrons.comlast month

    ‘Millennial Aversion’ and Other Risks for Harley-Davidson Stock

    Promotional costs, credit risks, and lower-margin new products will test Harley-Davison’s earnings in the year ahead.

  • Barrons.comlast month

    Used Harley-Davidson Prices Are Rising. Can the Stock Follow?

    A thin ray of sunshine lit the gloom surrounding Harley-Davidson, as an analyst noted that prices of used Harleys have ticked up.

  • Why Harley-Davidson Shares Are Down Today
    Motley Foollast month

    Why Harley-Davidson Shares Are Down Today

    Tariff talk keeps sending this company off the road.

  • Harley-Davidson's Plan for International Growth Could Be in Trouble
    Motley Foollast month

    Harley-Davidson's Plan for International Growth Could Be in Trouble

    India-based rival Jawa is off to a fast start with its new low-cost motorcycles.

  • Harley-Davidson CEO Levatich pushes back on critics of 'More Roads' strategy, LiveWire at annual meeting
    American City Business Journalslast month

    Harley-Davidson CEO Levatich pushes back on critics of 'More Roads' strategy, LiveWire at annual meeting

    Harley-Davidson held its annual shareholders meeting Thursday, and the question-and-answer session following the meeting opened Levatich up to wide-ranging affirmation and criticism about the direction and initiatives of the Milwaukee motorcycle company.