LUV - Southwest Airlines Co.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
54.00
-0.91 (-1.66%)
At close: 4:00PM EST

54.37 +0.37 (0.69%)
After hours: 4:36PM EST

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Previous Close54.91
Open54.54
Bid53.96 x 2200
Ask54.01 x 1300
Day's Range53.81 - 54.85
52 Week Range44.28 - 58.77
Volume4645572
Avg. Volume3,427,300
Market Cap28B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.44
PE Ratio (TTM)12.12
EPS (TTM)4.45
Earnings DateJan 23, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield0.72 (1.31%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-12-10
1y Target Est60.11
  • Southwest beefs up flying in Atlanta, Denver and more for next summer
    American City Business Journals

    Southwest beefs up flying in Atlanta, Denver and more for next summer

    Southwest Airlines will increase flying in a number of its major airports next summer, the airline announced Wednesday as it extended its booking schedule into August 2020. Southwest Airlines Co. (NYSE: LUV) currently has the 737 Max out of its schedule through early March next year. When the jet eventually comes back into service, that will allow Southwest to expand its network and begin flying more flights.

  • Southwest Airlines adds summer flights despite not knowing fate of 737 MAX planes
    American City Business Journals

    Southwest Airlines adds summer flights despite not knowing fate of 737 MAX planes

    The low-fare behemoth is betting the Boeing MAX will be back in service by the time the peak summer travel season begins.

  • Major airline to expand San Antonio service to multiple cities
    American City Business Journals

    Major airline to expand San Antonio service to multiple cities

    The expansion comes after the carrier cut back service this summer due to issues with the Boeing 737 Max aircraft.

  • Delta updates 2020 hiring plan with expectations of record-setting year
    American City Business Journals

    Delta updates 2020 hiring plan with expectations of record-setting year

    The pilot hiring plan is part of a broader effort to onboard more than 8,000 aviators in the next decade.

  • Report: Business travel dip on U.S. airlines flashes economic warning sign
    American City Business Journals

    Report: Business travel dip on U.S. airlines flashes economic warning sign

    U.S. Travel economists noted that historically, business travel typically declines before leisure travel does as the country heads into an economic slowdown, which is why the October dip is "possibly a worrisome harbinger for the broader economy."

  • Boeing's Timeline on 737 Max Return Foiled Again
    Bloomberg

    Boeing's Timeline on 737 Max Return Foiled Again

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- As another deadline for the return of Boeing Co.’s troubled 737 Max slips out of reach, the aerospace company doesn’t appear to have any better handle on its messaging now than it did when this crisis started more than a year ago.Federal Aviation Administration Administrator Stephen Dickson told CNBC on Wednesday that the agency won’t complete the necessary approvals for the Max’s return until 2020. The plane has been grounded since March following the second of two fatal crashes linked to a flight-control software system.  That’s a notable contrast to Boeing’s last official timing update, which called for the FAA to give it the green light to start shipping stockpiled jets by December. Regulators weren’t expected to certify new pilot-training requirements until several weeks later and airlines wouldn’t be able to fly the Max until they did, but beginning the process of clearing out the glut of undelivered jets would help Boeing manage its cash crunch and avoid further production cuts.At the time, I wondered why the FAA would be willing to bifurcate the certification process in order to throw Boeing a bone like this. It would appear from Dickson’s comments that he isn’t on board with this timeline. “Boeing’s plan is not the FAA’s plan,” Dickson said on CNBC. That puts Boeing in the awkward position of once again being on the wrong side of conservatism. The company has repeatedly moved the goal posts for the Max’s return. Boeing initially said it was on track to have the final paperwork on planned software fixes in to the FAA by late March and hosted a junket just weeks after the second crash to sell the fixes to customers and the media. Setbacks ensued, but Boeing told customers it was targeting FAA approval of the software fix as early as the third week of May and an ungrounding around mid-July, according to a Reuters report in April. More setbacks ensued, so Boeing said in July that it expected to have all recertification materials in to the FAA by September with the goal of having the grounding lifted in October – even as the Wall Street Journal reported that regulators and pilot union leaders at the time believed 2020 was more likely. Airline executives have cast their own doubts on Boeing’s timetables, with Gary Kelly, CEO of Southwest Airlines Co. — the largest Max customer — saying last month that he wasn’t “highly confident about a mid-December ungrounding date.”Clearly, no one has had a crystal ball when it comes to the Max crisis, but the past year has taught us the conservative approach is the prudent one, particularly as regulators contend with the damage done to their own reputations and the overall perception of safety in the aviation industry. And it is telling that after all this time, Boeing is still finding itself the one with the most aggressive assumptions.It’s a natural instinct to want to motivate your employees and soothe your shareholders. But amid persistent accusations that Boeing prioritized profits over safety in the development of the Max and rushed the initial rollout, it’s stunning that the company remains blind to the optics of deadlines that repeatedly prove overly optimistic or give the impression of special treatment from the FAA. Boeing has made changes to insulate its engineers from the company’s financial concerns and offered frequent sweeping commitments to safety. That said, CEO Dennis Muilenburg wasn’t willing or wasn’t able to detail specific changes to the company’s relationship with the FAA that he would support when he testified before Congress in October. I remain unconvinced that the right incentives are in place to ensure Boeing makes the kind of deep-rooted changes that are necessary, but the FAA’s unwillingness to be corralled into following the company’s timelines is a positive start.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Alaska, Delta back use of biometrics at Sea-Tac Airport
    American City Business Journals

    Alaska, Delta back use of biometrics at Sea-Tac Airport

    Alaska first tested fingerprint identification at its operation at San Jose Airport and in its lounges in 2015.

  • Southwest to add flights at Lambert during summer months
    American City Business Journals

    Southwest to add flights at Lambert during summer months

    St. Louis Lambert International Airport's largest carrier — Southwest Airlines — is adding 14 to 22 additional daily departures this summer.

  • PR Newswire

    Start Summer Vacation Planning Today: Southwest Airlines Extends Flight Schedule Through August 10, 2020

    Southwest Airlines Co. (NYSE: LUV) today extends its bookable flight schedule through Aug. 10, 2020. As part of the schedule extension, Southwest also announces plans to bring new service to some of the largest cities across its network including: Atlanta, Baltimore/Washington, Chicago (Midway), Denver, Houston (Hobby), and Nashville.

  • Here's What Southwest Airlines Co.'s (NYSE:LUV) P/E Is Telling Us
    Simply Wall St.

    Here's What Southwest Airlines Co.'s (NYSE:LUV) P/E Is Telling Us

    This article is for investors who would like to improve their understanding of price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios...

  • Airlines prep for record holiday travel deluge despite 737 MAX groundings
    American City Business Journals

    Airlines prep for record holiday travel deluge despite 737 MAX groundings

    The prolonged MAX grounding presents new challenges as airlines brace for record Christmas and New Year's travel deluge.

  • Near-Term Outlook Appears Enthralling for Airline Stocks
    Zacks

    Near-Term Outlook Appears Enthralling for Airline Stocks

    Near-Term Outlook Appears Enthralling for Airline Stocks

  • C.H. Robinson Rewards Shareholders With 2% Dividend Hike
    Zacks

    C.H. Robinson Rewards Shareholders With 2% Dividend Hike

    C.H. Robinson (CHRW) has been paying quarterly dividends for more than 25 years.

  • American Airlines' focus on improving on-time performance pays off
    American City Business Journals

    American Airlines' focus on improving on-time performance pays off

    American's has been focused on improving on-time performance, and November demonstrated the results of its efforts.

  • 20 businesses that died in the 2010s
    Yahoo Finance

    20 businesses that died in the 2010s

    Yahoo Finance takes a look back at some of the biggest corporate busts of the last decade.

  • Only one of the Bay Area's 3 major airports increased passengers in September. (Hint: It's not SFO or in the East Bay)
    American City Business Journals

    Only one of the Bay Area's 3 major airports increased passengers in September. (Hint: It's not SFO or in the East Bay)

    San Jose may have already broken last year’s record passenger count of 14.3 million, depending on November’s numbers, which will be released in a few weeks.

  • Benzinga

    Why's It Called That? The Story Behind LUV, FUN, MMM And Other Tickers

    Have you ever wondered why Southwest Airlines has the ticker LUV? Harley-Davidson motorcycles have been referred to as “hogs” for years. A member of the Wrecking Crew, Ray Weishaar, got a pet piglet that was adopted as the team mascot.

  • Hedge Funds Are Warming Up To Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV)
    Insider Monkey

    Hedge Funds Are Warming Up To Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV)

    Like everyone else, elite investors make mistakes. Some of their top consensus picks, such as Amazon, Facebook and Alibaba, have not done well in Q4 of 2018 due to various reasons. Nevertheless, the data show elite investors' consensus picks have done well on average over the long-term. The top 20 stocks among hedge funds beat […]

  • PR Newswire

    Southwest Airlines Executive Honored By Business Travel Industry

    Southwest Airlines Co. (NYSE: LUV) today announced one of its executives was recently recognized for being one of the most influential leaders in the business travel industry. Business Travel News named Dave Harvey, Vice President of Southwest Business, to its annual list of the 25 most influential people in 2019.

  • When it comes to airline apps, American and United rank last
    American City Business Journals

    When it comes to airline apps, American and United rank last

    As a category, airline travel apps do not notch satisfaction stores that are as high as those for other digitally-savvy companies such as credit card providers.

  • Barrons.com

    Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Sees Southwest Airlines Stake Top 10%

    Buffett didn’t buy more Southwest stock, but the airline has been repurchasing it, driving the share count lower.

  • Heavy snow on one end, ‘bomb cyclone’ on the other threatens U.S. Thanksgiving travel
    MarketWatch

    Heavy snow on one end, ‘bomb cyclone’ on the other threatens U.S. Thanksgiving travel

    The storm was heading to South Dakota, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin, while a “bomb cyclone” weather phenomenon began toppling trees, knocking out power and dumping snow as it barreled into California and Oregon — making for a double whammy of early wintry weather.

  • American City Business Journals

    Construction update: Orlando airport's $2B+ south terminal expansion

    Planes flying out of and into Orlando International Airport have one of the best views of the ongoing construction of the new south terminal. The $2 billion-plus facility, scheduled to open by late 2021, is one of the largest ongoing projects in Orlando and will have huge economic impacts once operational. The expansion adds another 19 gates to the airport with the ability to accommodate at least 24 aircraft, depending on size.

  • U.S. airlines expect record travel this Thanksgiving. Here are the biggest trouble spots
    American City Business Journals

    U.S. airlines expect record travel this Thanksgiving. Here are the biggest trouble spots

    The airline and airport data behemoth has crunched the numbers and offers some suggestions for what can be a terribly busy and stressful travel season.

  • Study: Sea-Tac will be unable to meet passenger demand by 2050
    American City Business Journals

    Study: Sea-Tac will be unable to meet passenger demand by 2050

    The Puget Sound region may need not one, but potentially several, new airports to cope with its surging aviation growth, says the Puget Sound Regional Council's Josh Brown, who is leading a deep-dive study on the issue.