PEP - PepsiCo, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
131.98
-0.41 (-0.31%)
At close: 4:00PM EST

131.98 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:38PM EST

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Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
Previous Close132.39
Open132.68
Bid131.57 x 1300
Ask132.01 x 800
Day's Range131.59 - 132.68
52 Week Range105.03 - 140.45
Volume3,246,698
Avg. Volume3,677,541
Market Cap184.033B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.57
PE Ratio (TTM)15.02
EPS (TTM)8.79
Earnings DateOct 3, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield3.82 (2.89%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-09-05
1y Target Est139.67
  • Coca-cola to launch seltzer brand in 2020
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Coca-cola to launch seltzer brand in 2020

    Coca-cola will roll out a new seltzer brand called “AHA” in March 2020. Yahoo Finance’s Brian Sozzi and Alexis Christoforous discuss on The First Trade.

  • Bloomberg

    Amazon Confirms Plans for Store Under New Grocery Brand

    (Bloomberg) -- Amazon.com Inc. plans to launch a new supermarket brand distinct from the Whole Foods Market chain the company acquired two years ago, a sign of the retail giant’s hunger for a slice of the grocery market beyond high-end organic food.The company has posted four job listings for “Amazon’s first grocery store” in the Woodland Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles. An Amazon spokeswoman confirmed the listings, and said the store would open in 2020. The brand will be distinct from Whole Foods and will have a conventional checkout line, unlike the cashierless Amazon Go convenience stores, she said. Amazon’s plans for the store were reported earlier by CNET.The e-commerce company purchased Whole Foods in a splashy $13.7 billion deal two years ago, but has yet to make much headway in the $900 billion U.S. grocery industry. The Whole Foods brand, finicky about what is allowed on store shelves based on its healthy image, clashes with Amazon’s desire to give customers whatever they want. Amazon rival Walmart Inc., which captures about 25% of all U.S. grocery spending, sells items such as Pepsi and Cheetos that shoppers can’t find at Whole Foods. Grocery industry analysts have speculated that Amazon might branch out with a new store where such products won’t be seen as betrayal to the brand.Online grocery shoppers prefer in-store pickup options to home delivery by nearly a 2-to-1 margin, and Amazon needs more stores to meet that growing demand, said David Bishop, a partner with research firm Brick Meets Click. In-store pickup requires more stores closer to shoppers -- about 3 to 5 miles from their homes -- than grocery delivery services, he said.“The reason Amazon needs to expand its physical footprint is an accelerated demand for grocery pickup service as opposed to delivery,” he said. “Shoppers have a greater sense of control when they pick up their groceries at the store in a secure location rather than worrying about it being left at their house.”Amazon’s sales from physical stores, the vast majority of which are purchases at Whole Foods stores, declined 1.3% from a year earlier to $4.19 billion in the third quarter. Amazon said the total doesn’t include online sales from Whole Foods, but the Seattle-based company doesn’t break out that figure.Woodland Hills is an upscale suburban neighborhood in the San Fernando Valley. The Wall Street Journal reported earlier this year that Amazon planned to open dozens of grocery stores under a new brand, starting with an outpost in Los Angeles.(Updates with analyst’s comment in fifth paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Matt Day in Seattle at mday63@bloomberg.net;Spencer Soper in Seattle at ssoper@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Beer giants keep lobbying to end ‘complicated, obscure pricing’ for aluminum cans
    MarketWatch

    Beer giants keep lobbying to end ‘complicated, obscure pricing’ for aluminum cans

    Brewers and producers of other canned drinks are continuing to lobby this fall for the government to take a greater role in aluminum pricing, as a benchmark for the metal hasn’t fallen that much from last year’s tariffs-induced high.

  • CBD beverage founder: 'I want to be regulated'
    Yahoo Finance

    CBD beverage founder: 'I want to be regulated'

    Not nearly enough legislative ink has been spilled over the booming CBD industry, according to Benjamin Witte. 

  • Coca-Cola launching a new sparkling water brand, Aha, in March 2020
    MarketWatch

    Coca-Cola launching a new sparkling water brand, Aha, in March 2020

    Coca-Cola North America is adding a new sparkling water brand, Aha, to its lineup in March 2020. Created in about six months, Aha will be the beverage giant’s first new brand in a decade. Aha will come in eight flavors including lime and watermelon, strawberry and cucumber, and blueberry and pomegranate.

  • Kahn Brothers' 3rd-Quarter Update
    GuruFocus.com

    Kahn Brothers' 3rd-Quarter Update

    Hedge fund buys shares of Pepsi and Keycorp, sells abundance of Merck Continue reading...

  • Coca-Cola makes 'big bet' on new caffeinated sparkling water brand
    American City Business Journals

    Coca-Cola makes 'big bet' on new caffeinated sparkling water brand

    Coca-Cola will bolster its fast-growing water portfolio with a new caffeinated sparkling water brand, calling the new product its "first major new brand launch" in more than a decade. The Coca-Cola Co. (NYSE: KO) said Thursday it will launch AHA nationally in March of 2020, with eight flavor combos (Lime + Watermelon, Strawberry + Cucumber, Citrus + Green Tea, Black Cherry + Coffee, Orange + Grapefruit, Apple + Ginger, Blueberry + Pomegranate, and Peach + Honey). “As the largest and fastest-growing part of the water business, mainstream flavored sparkling water is a segment we know we must double-down on,” said Celina Li, Vice president of water for Coca-Cola North America, on the company's website.

  • Coca-Cola launches its biggest new drink in 10 years
    Yahoo Finance

    Coca-Cola launches its biggest new drink in 10 years

    Coca-Cola gets into the surging seltzer market. Here's what they are launching.

  • Green Bonds Get Rubber-Stamped as Investors Question the Label
    Bloomberg

    Green Bonds Get Rubber-Stamped as Investors Question the Label

    (Bloomberg) -- Global investor enthusiasm for saving the planet has helped spur record issuance of green bonds. It’s also driving a surge in third-party verification that proceeds from the debt sales are actually destined for environmentally friendly projects, as fears of “greenwashing” mount.There have been about 480 green bonds issued by companies and governments so far this year with some form of assurance, a record high, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That’s about 80% of all the green debt sold, and PepsiCo Inc. and Starbucks Corp. are among those paying independent reviewers for certification.“If we say something is sustainable, when our clients look under the hood it has to live up to that reputation,” said Mark Haefele, chief investment officer at UBS Wealth Management, which buys green bonds. Asset managers are concerned about lack of definition of what’s truly green, Haefele -- whose firm manages $2.5 trillion in assets -- said in an interview.Borrowers don’t have to prove proceeds will be used for a particular purpose, though second opinions can help sell bonds at a time when issuance is surging. Companies and governments typically align offerings with green bond principles and standards endorsed by the International Capital Market Association and Climate Bonds Initiative. But misleading claims about environmental benefits of projects are on the rise, making assurance and second opinions increasingly important to investors.“It really comes down to credibility,” said Heather Lang, executive director of sustainable finance solutions at Sustainalytics, which sells second opinions to green bond issuers. “Borrowers want to ensure the frameworks they put in place focusing on the green use of proceeds are aligned with global guidelines,” she said in a phone interview.Sustainalytics issued 35% more second-party opinions for green bonds in the third-quarter of this year compared to the same period a year ago. That included a 20-page opinion on Verizon’s green bond framework before the phone giant sold $1 billion in green bonds in February.The benefit of getting the second party opinion outweighed the cost, according to Kee Chan Sin, Verizon’s assistant treasurer.“It’s important to tie the green bond back to Verizon’s commitment to certain things like renewable energy and carbon neutral,” said Sin in a phone interview. “For some companies it might be expensive but for us it is money well spent.”What’s Green?Borrowers are taking advantage of the varying interpretations of green finance. Spanish refiner Repsol SA became the first major oil company to sell green bonds when it raised 500 million euros ($559 million) to help cut greenhouse-gas emissions and make its facilities more efficient in May 2017. That raised greenwashing concerns and led the Climate Bonds Initiative to exclude the debt from its database.Pepsi’s $1 billion green bonds -- marked for projects like sustainable plastics and packaging -- may be excluded from the Climate Bonds Initiative database if the company doesn’t provide more information on plastics. Bloomberg LP, the parent of Bloomberg News, also provides a green bond classification.Some borrowers are going a step further and asking auditors to review the use and management of proceeds, as well as reporting after the bond is issued. Assurance that funds raised are being allocated to the right projects could help the market grow, said Kristen Sullivan, sustainability and KPI services leader at Deloitte, which provides assurance to green bond issuers.Some investors are also doing their own audits.Large bond funds like Nuveen, which manages over $11 billion in responsible investing fixed-income strategies, are coming up with their own guidelines for identifying green bonds. The fund opted not to buy Verizon’s green debt because of “concerns around the lack of clarity on impact reporting and potential inclusion of 5G,” said Jessica Zarzycki, a co-manager of responsible investing fixed-income strategies at Nuveen.“You have to make sure what the issuer is promising is really what you are getting and everybody needs to do their homework,” said Zarzycki in a phone interview. “We’ve seen bonds that are labeled green and have second-party opinions where they don’t fit typically to our framework.”\--With assistance from Olivia Whalen, Bloomberg Global Data.To contact the reporter on this story: Caleb Mutua in New York at dmutua@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nikolaj Gammeltoft at ngammeltoft@bloomberg.net, James Crombie, Allan LopezFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Here's the latest on Frito-Lay's proposed $130M facility
    American City Business Journals

    Here's the latest on Frito-Lay's proposed $130M facility

    Frito-Lay Inc. still is pursuing a fulfillment center in Osceola County, but does not yet have a timeline for the facility's construction. Frito-Lay's facility, which could employ 200 people, is still in communication with Osceola County on the proposed facility, the company said in a prepared statement to Orlando Business Journal.

  • How to Invest in a Declining Interest Rate Environment
    GuruFocus.com

    How to Invest in a Declining Interest Rate Environment

    Investors need to make some necessary adjustments to prepare for the expected economic slowdown Continue reading...

  • The 10 most FIRE-friendly places to live if you want to retire early
    MarketWatch

    The 10 most FIRE-friendly places to live if you want to retire early

    Short for Financial Independence, Retire Early, the FIRE movement finds its roots in the 1992 best-seller “Your Money or Your Life” by Joe Dominguez (a Wall Street financial analyst who — you guessed it — retired at 31) and Vicki Robin (who turned a modest inheritance into an income stream that allowed her to quit work at 23). As a result, “Knoxville is an easy place to live, to raise a family, or to retire,” she says.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Enjoy Infinite Hydration In Style with New Drinkfinity Bottle

    Today, Drinkfinity announced the relaunch of their brand including the release of a new all-in-one stainless steel water bottle, available in five colors, plus three new low calorie, flavor-packed caffeine pods. To realize this vision, they created a hydration system in the form of a reusable water bottle and pods, thereby helping to provide infinite hydration. Through its unique duality, Drinkfinity enables you to effortlessly enjoy either plain water or pop a juice-based pod to plus up your water.

  • PepsiCo Leaders Go 'Bananas' For Hakuna Brands Banana Nice Cream, Awards Founder Hannah Hong $100,000 As Inaugural Winner Of Stacy's Rise Project
    PR Newswire

    PepsiCo Leaders Go 'Bananas' For Hakuna Brands Banana Nice Cream, Awards Founder Hannah Hong $100,000 As Inaugural Winner Of Stacy's Rise Project

    PLANO, Texas, Nov. 5, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- This summer, five women of varying ages and backgrounds converged in the suburbs of Dallas to begin a whirlwind journey with seemingly one thing in common: they were finalists in the inaugural Stacy's Rise Project, a funding and mentorship program exclusively for female entrepreneurs in the food and beverage industry, given that female founders in the United States received only 2.3 percenti of venture capitalist funding in the last year. Yesterday, the strangers-turned-friends met again in New York City, all having earned $20,000 in business funding – but even richer after spending the last three months learning from top marketing, sales, innovation, R&D, and digital executives at PepsiCo and Frito-Lay.

  • Coca-Cola, Nestlé and Pepsi top this list of plastic violators, and there’s been a solar breakthrough from Sweden
    MarketWatch

    Coca-Cola, Nestlé and Pepsi top this list of plastic violators, and there’s been a solar breakthrough from Sweden

    Evidence of the increasing effects of climate change is building, as are the investing opportunities and changes in consumer habits linked to environmental concerns and resource use. Here are select dispatches about the companies responding to customer demands and climate risk, the ESG investors and their advisers, and the policy-makers, enterprising individuals and scientists preparing for tomorrow. BreakFreeFromPlastic, a three-year-old organization of some 1,800 members working to tackle plastic pollution has called in the volunteers that tally top plastic polluters by brand, and the amount of refuse clogging the world’s waterways remains alarming.

  • McDonald's has a new CEO: 3 quick facts about him
    Yahoo Finance

    McDonald's has a new CEO: 3 quick facts about him

    McDonald's CEO Steve Easterbrook has been ousted after an inappropriate relationship with an employee. Here's what we know about the new guy atop the Golden Arches.

  • PepsiCo (PEP) Down 0.6% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?
    Zacks

    PepsiCo (PEP) Down 0.6% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?

    PepsiCo (PEP) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • PepsiCo Announces Timing and Availability of Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2019 Financial Results and Conference Call
    PR Newswire

    PepsiCo Announces Timing and Availability of Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2019 Financial Results and Conference Call

    PURCHASE, N.Y. , Nov. 1, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- PepsiCo, Inc. (NASDAQ: PEP) today announced that it will issue its fourth quarter and full year 2019 (ending December 28) financial results and other related ...

  • Bottlers Want to Profit From Your Tap Water
    Bloomberg

    Bottlers Want to Profit From Your Tap Water

    (Bloomberg) -- Over the past four decades, consumers around the world have chugged trillions of bottles of water from brands such as Perrier, Evian, Dasani, and Aquafina. Few realize that most of what they pay for is plastic and time on a truck. Companies typically get the water for free or just a nominal fee, and bottling the stuff and getting it to consumers—as well as advertising it—accounts for the bulk of their costs.Today, increasing concern about the carbon and plastic waste generated by that process is fueling a backlash that threatens the business. Across the industry, sales are softening and some towns are even banning plastic water bottles—spurring producers to respond with alternatives ranging from canned water to flavor pods for tap water to dispensers that sell sparkling and flavored mixes.“The waters business has to cope with a number of sustainability issues that are becoming increasingly important,” Nestle SA Chief Executive Officer Mark Schneider told analysts in October.Until the 1970s, bottled water was mostly sold in limited areas by European companies that tapped springs in the Alps. Then in 1973, DuPont patented PET plastic bottles, which were cheaper, lighter, and stronger than the glass that had been the industry standard. Combined with the rapidly globalizing economy, PET allowed water sellers to ship their wares much farther, opening up new markets. Bottlers sprung up in just about every country and the likes of Nestle, Coca-Cola, and PepsiCo added water to their portfolios, helping boost global revenue in the business to $130 billion last year, according to researcher Euromonitor.These days, things aren’t quite so bubbly as consumers grow increasingly aware of their carbon footprint. Danone, the maker of Evian, on Oct. 18 reported its biggest decline in quarterly water revenue in a decade. That same day, Coca-Cola Co. said water sales were lower than it expected.With shipments headed for a second annual decline, Nestle is reorganizing its bottled water business. Buffeted by lower-price rivals and high transport costs, Nestle raised prices—which sapped sales of its mass-market offerings such as Poland Spring and Pure Life as consumers shifted to cheaper generic brands. CEO Schneider has said the company wants to focus instead on higher-end products such as flavored and sparkling waters like its Perrier and San Pellegrino brands.More than 80 U.S. colleges and a handful of municipalities have restricted sales of bottled water. In Concord, Mass., it’s illegal to sell still water in small plastic bottles, and San Francisco bars such sales on city property. In the U.K., a non-profit called City to Sea has introduced an app that points thirsty users to places where they can get free water—with a pledge from chains such as Starbucks and Costa to refill bottles at no cost.“Producers face a real risk from the environmental movement, which has strong support among young people,” says Alain Oberhuber, an analyst at Mainfirst Bank, who predicts a sharp decline in sales of bottled water over the next two decades. “They know they have to do something.”With bottled water now outselling carbonated soft drinks in the U.S., one part of that “something” is aluminum cans filled with water. Coke introduced cans of Dasani in the northeast U.S. this year and plans to try selling it in aluminum bottles in 2020. Pepsi has been selling canned Aquafina at restaurants and stadiums and is testing it in stores. And Danone is trying the idea with local brands in Britain, Denmark, and Poland.The soda giants are also seeking to monetize consumption of tap water. Pepsi last year paid more than $3 billion for SodaStream, which produces systems for making fizzy water at home. And Pepsi has introduced a brand called Drinkfinity, which sells pods that attach to reusable bottles to infuse tap water with caffeine, vitamins, or electrolytes in a variety of flavors.  Coke is rolling out a water dispenser it calls Dasani PureFill, which allows consumers to refill their bottles with free filtered water and gives the option of adding flavors or carbonation for about $1 for a 20-ounce bottle. The company is planning to test the idea—and various prices—at roughly 100 locations such as offices, hospitals, and colleges.Nestle next year plans to introduce a dispenser it calls Refill Plus, which filters tap water and can add flavors and varying levels of carbonation,  and it’s working on a paper-based bottle that it says is fully biodegradable. Danone is exploring refill stations but for now is focusing on the home market with a new device that dispenses Evian delivered in balloon-like spheres that use less plastic than bottles.Producers are counting on such initiatives to appeal to consumers who consider branded water healthier than tap. Howard Telford, head of soft drinks at Euromonitor, says such efforts will have only a marginal effect on the industry’s carbon footprint. But he says adding extras such as flavorings and fizz may help shore up profits for the likes of Coke, Nestle, and Pepsi.“It points to a future,” Telford says, “where flavor, carbonation, and functional additives—rather than disposable packaging and simple convenience—could be the main value drivers in packaged water.”To contact the authors of this story: Thomas Mulier in Geneva at tmulier@bloomberg.netCorinne Gretler in Zurich at cgretler1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: David Rocks at drocks1@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • PepsiCo Foods North America CEO touches on new role as company invests $1M in southern Dallas
    American City Business Journals

    PepsiCo Foods North America CEO touches on new role as company invests $1M in southern Dallas

    PepsiCo Foods North America CEO Steven Williams said he’s also focused on helping improve the company by looking into making the company more environmentally sustainable and by investing in local programs.

  • Frito-Lay Deepens Commitment to Southern Dallas in Celebration of One-Year Anniversary of Southern Dallas Thrives Initiative
    PR Newswire

    Frito-Lay Deepens Commitment to Southern Dallas in Celebration of One-Year Anniversary of Southern Dallas Thrives Initiative

    DALLAS, Oct. 31, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- PepsiCo's Frito-Lay North America today announced a $1 million grant from The PepsiCo Foundation to support the expansion of its Southern Dallas Thrives initiative. The additional funding brings the company's total commitment to Southern Dallas to more than $3 million.

  • Financial Times

    Can we break our addiction to plastic? The future of packaging

    Every week or two, Magali Sartre, a 44-year-old who lives in Paris, goes online to grocery shop. She clicks on orange juice, olive oil, tea, pasta, cookies and crackers — a typical order for herself, her ...

  • Yacktman Focused Fund Trims Procter & Gamble, Microsoft
    GuruFocus.com

    Yacktman Focused Fund Trims Procter & Gamble, Microsoft

    Fund's largest sales of the 3rd quarter Continue reading...

  • The stock market is at a record high and it's unbelievable
    Yahoo Finance

    The stock market is at a record high and it's unbelievable

    Stock prices are touching new records and it's amazing considering all the negative news on trade and economy this year.

  • Benzinga

    Regional-Haul Tractors Achieve 8.3 MPG In NACFE's Run On Less Regional Demonstration

    Regional-haul fleets participating in the North American Council for Freight Efficiency (NACFE) Run on Less Regional demonstration achieved an overall 8.3 miles per gallon (mpg) over the three-week event, said Mike Roeth, executive director of NACFE. The 10 fleets that signed up for the run included three returning fleets from the 2017 Run on Less event: Hirschbach, Ploger Transportation, and PepsiCo.