S - Sprint Corporation

NYSE - Nasdaq Real Time Price. Currency in USD
6.88
+0.03 (+0.51%)
As of 1:56PM EDT. Market open.
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Previous Close6.84
Open6.81
Bid6.88 x 21500
Ask6.89 x 28000
Day's Range6.80 - 6.89
52 Week Range5.44 - 8.06
Volume4,610,989
Avg. Volume17,581,853
Market Cap28.139B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.04
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend Date2007-12-05
1y Target EstN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
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  • T-Mobile employees ask Deutsche Telekom CEO to preserve pay and jobs in Sprint merger
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  • Sprint loses in Maryland cellphone trafficking appeal
    Reuters

    Sprint loses in Maryland cellphone trafficking appeal

    A federal appeals court on Thursday threw out a $26.9 million award in favor of Sprint Corp, in a setback to the company's years-long campaign to stop what it calls cellphone trafficking. In a 3-0 decision, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, said Sprint's contracts with customers who bought "upgraded" phones did not unambiguously prohibit those customers from reselling their phones to third parties. The court overturned a June 2018 judgment against Wireless Buybacks LLC.

  • Hold Your Tears at T-Mobile’s Sprint Pity Party
    Bloomberg

    Hold Your Tears at T-Mobile’s Sprint Pity Party

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- T-Mobile US Inc. is trying to make the case that Sprint Corp. is on its deathbed, and that T-Mobile alone can save it. That’s rich coming from the company that happily helped put Sprint there. It’s also a misleading prognosis for Sprint. A Sprint pity party is one way T-Mobile is defending against a multi-state lawsuit that seeks to prevent the wireless carrier from taking over its weaker rival, and it used that reasoning in a court filing last week. Even though the deal already has the backing of the U.S. Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission, 17 state attorneys general – who represent more than half the U.S. population – are challenging the transaction because of concerns that it will lead to higher prices, discourage innovation and hurt workers. Illinois, Oregon and Texas were the latest to join the now-bipartisan suit, whose trial date is set for Dec. 9. State officials are right to be concerned. T-Mobile and Sprint are the third- and fourth-biggest carriers, respectively, in a mainly four-carrier market. Lower prices and new features from them in recent years did a lot of good for customers, forcing industry leaders Verizon Communications Inc. and AT&T Inc. to offer more competitive data plans. But without Sprint, there isn’t as much incentive for T-Mobile to keep prices down. In fact, for T-Mobile to close its profit-margin gap with the larger carriers, it more likely would need to do just the opposite. The DOJ is looking to wireless market newbie Dish Network Corp. to help preserve some equilibrium, putting Dish on the receiving end of the concessions that T-Mobile and Sprint are required to make. However, Dish is still years and multiple billions of dollars away from becoming a formidable competitor to fill the hole Sprint will leave behind. As such, the DOJ and the FCC may not be fulfilling their duties to promote competition and ensure that corporate tie-ups serve the public interest. T-Mobile’s argument is that if its deal gets blocked, Sprint is going to go away anyway. That’s a half-truth. I’ve written time and again about Sprint’s financial troubles and strategic missteps, including this series of charts showing just how ugly Sprint looks as a stand-alone. The data are almost sympathetic to T-Mobile’s case. But a merger between T-Mobile and Sprint doesn’t save Sprint. It does rescue an investment turned sour for many shareholders, especially a billionaire named Masayoshi Son. He’s the leader of SoftBank Group Corp., Sprint’s Japanese controlling shareholder, and he wants to remove any trace of his misguided optimism about Sprint from SoftBank’s balance sheet, equity valuation and image. SoftBank is retaining a 27% economic interest in the new T-Mobile, a superior operator on healthier footing.T-Mobile is casting itself as Sprint's savior, but T-Mobile CEO John Legere has been dancing on Sprint’s grave for years. Legere, a shameless yet successful self-promoter, often crossed the line in these instances beyond healthy competition, tweeting mean-spirited jokes about his rival going out of business. There were times he called Sprint “a melting ice cube,” said the company may have to resort to raising money on Kickstarter, and asked for “any guesses on what Sprint will fruckup today” (a swipe at Sprint’s “framily plan” promotion for friends and family). He used the hashtag SprintLikeHell. I’m not pointing this out for the sake of it or to say Legere is a big ole meanie. It’s more about this: While Legere was dissing Sprint, he continued to boast to investors that T-Mobile was actually posing serious competition for Verizon and AT&T – something he promises a combined T-Mobile-Sprint will also do. Except the data paint a slightly different picture. For years, T-Mobile regularly disclosed so-called porting ratios, which tell how many customers T-Mobile lost to another carrier and vice versa. For example, starting in 2013, its porting ratio with Sprint mostly held above 2 and at times went above 4 and higher, meaning that for every subscriber T-Mobile lost to Sprint, it gained four Sprint customers. T-Mobile will say that the overwhelming majority of its “porting” has come from Verizon and AT&T, but that’s explained by the fact that those companies have larger subscriber bases than Sprint does. The reality is that T-Mobile inflicted far more damage on Sprint than to what it calls “the duopoly,” as this chart shows:To be fair, T-Mobile isn’t the predominant reason Sprint is in such a desperate state now. Its problems date back to Sprint’s ill-advised merger 14 years ago with Nextel, a network that became a money pit for the company. And Sprint was never able to dig its way out from a mountain of debt, largely deal-related. Meanwhile, in 2011, regulators stopped AT&T from buying T-Mobile, a move that set T-Mobile up for a turnaround and to become the fastest-growing member of the industry. Had that deal gone through, consumers’ bills may have looked very different in the subsequent years.Going forward, if Sprint were to get any cheaper, other deep-pocketed buyers outside of the industry would likely surface, such as Charter Communications Inc., Comcast Corp. and others. The idea of a cable giant owning Sprint might not seem like a better outcome, but it preserves a competitor in the wireless market and many more jobs. As the industry gears up for ultra-fast 5G wireless networks, there’s simply no way T-Mobile is the sole company interested in Sprint’s spectrum assets and subscriber base, even if its brand is beyond repair. So when T-Mobile tells a courtroom that Sprint needs it, you have to laugh.To contact the author of this story: Tara Lachapelle at tlachapelle@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Telecom Stock Roundup: Sprint Boosts Video Analytics, AT&T's Content Deal & More
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  • T-Mobile and Sprint 'stuck our necks out' for 5G, exec says
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  • Illinois Joins Lawsuit to Block T-Mobile–Sprint Merger
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  • Sprint Stock Drops 9.7% in August—What’s Next?
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  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Illinois joins lawsuit to stop T-Mobile, Sprint merger

    Illinois has joined a multistate lawsuit aimed at stopping the merger of U.S. wireless carriers T-Mobile US Inc and Sprint Corp, the New York attorney general's office, which is leading the effort along with California, said on Tuesday. Illinois joins 15 other states and the District of Columbia in seeking to stop the $26 billion merger, which the states argue will lead to higher costs for consumers. A spokeswoman for T-Mobile said the company had no comment.

  • Illinois joins lawsuit to stop T-Mobile, Sprint merger
    Reuters

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    Illinois has joined a multistate lawsuit aimed at stopping the merger of U.S. wireless carriers T-Mobile US Inc and Sprint Corp , the New York attorney general's office, which is leading the effort along with California, said on Tuesday. Illinois joins 15 other states and the District of Columbia in seeking to stop the $26 billion merger, which the states argue will lead to higher costs for consumers. A spokeswoman for T-Mobile said the company had no comment.

  • Sprint (S) Down 5.4% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?
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  • Twitter Blames Mobile Carrier for Dorsey’s Vulgar Account Hack
    Bloomberg

    Twitter Blames Mobile Carrier for Dorsey’s Vulgar Account Hack

    (Bloomberg) -- Twitter Inc. blamed Chief Executive Officer Jack Dorsey’s mobile phone carrier for a hack of his Twitter account that sent out a stream of offensive tweets on Friday.“The phone number associated with the account was compromised due to a security oversight by the mobile provider,” Twitter said in a comment posted by spokesman Brandon Borrman late Friday.Borrman clarified Saturday that the company isn’t identifying the carrier, and so far none of the four major U.S. mobile providers has admitted responsibility.The security incident “allowed an unauthorized person to compose and send tweets via text message from the phone number. That issue is now resolved,” according to the Friday statement. The clarification appears to support speculation that Dorsey was the victim of SIM swapping. That’s when someone convinces a mobile carrier to switch an existing number to a new SIM card they control. In this case, it may have required the hackers to have personal details that would allow them to convincingly impersonate one of Silicon Valley’s best-known figures.More than 15 tweets, many containing obscenities and racist comments, were posted on Dorsey’s account, @jack, shortly before 4 p.m. New York time on Friday. The company started deleting the tweets from Dorsey’s verified Twitter account, which has more than 4 million followers, about 20 minutes after the messages went viral.A person familiar with Sprint’s operations said the company checked late Friday and there was no record of an account associated with Dorsey. A spokeswoman for T-Mobile, Tara Darrow, said that “for privacy and security reasons, we would never discuss an individual’s circumstances or if they are a customer.” Verizon Communications Inc. and AT&T Inc. didn’t respond to queries from Bloomberg News on Saturday asking if they were Dorsey’s provider.The attack may not have required any in-person communication on the part of the fraudster. A group calling itself the Chuckling Squad claimed credit for the hack.“You can call in and say, ‘I bought a new phone and I need a new SIM card assigned to this number,’” said Lawrence Pingree, a research vice president at the IT research company Gartner Inc. If the caller provides the correct information, they might succeed, and the problem is made worse because call centers handle a high volume of calls, he said.Some of the tweets sent from Dorsey’s account used anti-black slurs, praised Adolf Hitler and talked about a bomb at Twitter’s headquarters. Many of them referenced the Chuckling Squad, which also took credit for the hack of several YouTube and Instagram celebrities this month, including James Charles, Shane Dawson, King Bach and Amanda Cerny.Borrman said he “didn’t have anything to share on that right now” when asked whether the FBI or local law enforcement was investigating Dorsey’s hack. Sgt. Samy Tarazi, of the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office, whose agency is part of a five-county cyber task force in the Bay area that’s been focused on SIM swapping for the last 18 months, said swapping represents a massive flaw in mobile security because the phone’s user loses all control of their device; the decision to change out the SIM is left to the mobile carrier. Some victims have been hit multiple times.Tarazi said in some cases employees of a mobile carrier are paid to swap the cards by the hackers, but in others, the perpetrators are just clever at impersonating the victim. Tarazi said he’s seen the fraud performed successfully by hackers as young as 13 years old.While the attack on Dorsey’s account didn’t appear to be financially motivated, SIM swapping can be lucrative when used to steal cryptocurrency that’s secured through data or applications linked to a victim’s mobile phone.Prosecuting SIM swaps is challenging because it’s often difficult to explain the process to a judge or jury that isn’t tech savvy, Tarazi said. In addition, “it’s really trying to explain the seriousness of a 16-year-old working from his bedroom in his parent’s house stealing millions of dollars. It’s hard to wrap your head around.”After Dorsey’s hack, other Twitter users expressed concern that an even more prominent and prolific user -- President Donald Trump -- could be just as easily hacked, compromising global political relations. Trump, who regularly uses the service to announce policy decisions, expressed little concern about that scenario.“Well, I hope they’re not hacking my account, but actually if they do, they’re not going to learn too much more than what I put out, right?” Trump told reporters Friday evening as he left the White House. “Shouldn’t be too bad.”Twitter declined to comment on the security measures Dorsey uses. His account was hacked in 2016 through a connection to his Vine account, so he probably uses more security around the account than most users.Twitter lets users post tweets by text, and it’s likely the method that was used to post the offensive remarks, which wouldn’t require having Dorsey’s password or directly hacking Twitter’s systems.The tweets were sent via a service called Cloudhopper that allows tweeting via SMS. Twitter acquired Cloudhopper in 2010.\--With assistance from Andrew Martin and Alyza Sebenius.To contact the reporters on this story: Sarah Frier in San Francisco at sfrier1@bloomberg.net;Michael Riley in Washington at michaelriley@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Matthew G. Miller, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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