T - AT&T Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
29.84
-0.76 (-2.48%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT
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Previous Close30.60
Open29.69
Bid0.00 x 1800
Ask0.00 x 1300
Day's Range29.22 - 30.82
52 Week Range26.08 - 39.70
Volume46,386,011
Avg. Volume44,965,559
Market Cap214.344B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.58
PE Ratio (TTM)15.75
EPS (TTM)1.89
Earnings DateApr 21, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield2.08 (6.97%)
Ex-Dividend DateJan 08, 2020
1y Target Est38.10
  • Saudi spies tracked phones using flaws the FCC failed to fix for years
    TechCrunch

    Saudi spies tracked phones using flaws the FCC failed to fix for years

    Lawmakers and security experts have long warned of security flaws in the underbelly of the world's cell networks. Now a whistleblower says the Saudi government is exploiting those flaws to track its citizens across the U.S. as part of a "systematic" surveillance campaign. The Guardian obtained a cache of data amounting to millions of locations on Saudi citizens over a four-month period beginning in November.

  • TheStreet.com

    Here's When 'Friends,' 'Seinfeld' and 'The Office' Are Disappearing From Netflix

    With millions of people homebound, binge watching has gone from a weekend indulgence to a nightly ritual. Here's where your favorite shows are headed this year.

  • Microsoft Deal Values Affirmed Networks at $1.35 Billion
    Bloomberg

    Microsoft Deal Values Affirmed Networks at $1.35 Billion

    (Bloomberg) -- Microsoft Corp.’s agreement to acquire 5G software maker Affirmed Networks Inc. valued the company at about $1.35 billion, according to people familiar with the matter.Microsoft announced the deal on Thursday without disclosing financial details.Microsoft already serves telecom customers and struck an agreement with AT&T Inc. last year with the aim of moving more the carrier’s network to its platform. Microsoft has been building its cloud computing operations through acquisitions. In 2018, it bought privately held GitHub for $7.5 billion.Affirmed Networks also held talks with Samsung Electronics before its deal with Microsoft came together, one of the people said.Pete Wootton, a spokesman for Microsoft, declined to comment on the price. A representative for Affirmed Networks also declined to comment. Samsung didn’t respond to a request for comment.Microsoft shares fell 4.1% Friday to close at $149.70.The introduction of 5G is just starting, with test projects by carriers such as AT&T generally limited to select big cities. Nationwide U.S. coverage may take years. But tech giants and telecom industry incumbents have been angling for a slice of the market for edge computing and going after big corporate customers. The White House has made 5G a linchpin of its tech policy, particularly as it tries to suppress the global expansion of China’s Huawei Technologies Co.The networking industry is transitioning away from expensive fixed purpose machines that take care of specific parts of the job of managing the flow of data to software that resides in remote data centers. The aim is to make the things cheaper and more flexible.Affirmed Networks helps build virtual networks for telecom customers using 5G technology. It was founded in 2010 and had raised about $240 million in funding, according to Pitchbook Data. It raised financing just last month at a $1.35 billion valuation, people familiar with the matter said.Affirmed Networks said on Thursday that it was replacing its chief executive officer with one of its founders, Anand Krishnamurthy.Affirmed Networks, based in Acton, Massachusetts, is backed by investors including Qualcomm Ventures and Centerview Capital Technology Management, the venture arm of investment bank Centerview Partners, as well as by Lightspeed Management, CRV and Bessemer Venture Partners,(Updates with line on Samsung’s interest in fourth paragraph, adds share price in sixth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • AT&T Declares Quarterly Dividend on Preferred Shares
    Business Wire

    AT&T Declares Quarterly Dividend on Preferred Shares

    The board of directors of AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) today declared quarterly dividends on the company’s 5.000% Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series A and the company’s 4.750% Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series C. The Series A dividend is $312.50 per preferred share, or $0.3125 per depositary share. The Series C dividend is $240.7986111 per preferred share, or $0.2407986111 per depositary share. The dividends are payable on May 1, 2020, to stockholders of record at the close of business on April 9, 2020.

  • Microsoft (MSFT) Inks Deal to Acquire Affirmed Networks
    Zacks

    Microsoft (MSFT) Inks Deal to Acquire Affirmed Networks

    Microsoft (MSFT) is expected to expand presence in 5G edge cloud computing market with latest acquisition of Affirmed Networks.

  • AT&T Sees Uptick in Kids, Family and News Viewership
    PR Newswire

    AT&T Sees Uptick in Kids, Family and News Viewership

    Whether it's parents turning on the TV after a long day of work and childcare, throwing on a movie in the middle of the day to entertain kids, or consuming more news than ever – our viewing patterns and habits have shifted.

  • AT&T Declares Quarterly Dividend
    Business Wire

    AT&T Declares Quarterly Dividend

    The board of directors of AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) today declared a quarterly dividend of $0.52 a share on the company’s common shares. The dividend is payable on May 1, 2020, to stockholders of record at the close of business on April 9, 2020.

  • Bloomberg

    Sad About a Buyback Ban and Pay Cuts? Deal With It

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Shareholders of companies such as airlines have a case to make when they argue that the coronavirus pandemic is nobody's fault, and therefore any entity that needs government relief shouldn't be penalized when it seeks public assistance. Why put restrictions on stock buybacks or executive compensation for a publicly traded company seeking aid if small businesses making similar requests don't receive the same restrictions? But in a situation like this requiring significant new legislation and spending, maintaining public trust and support is paramount. If penalizing shareholders and executives is what it takes to ensure political support and keep the country united behind the work of Congress, then it's worth doing, regardless of whether it's fair.A key question is why publicly traded companies alone warrant restrictions. Nobody's clamoring for workers to pledge not to buy a car or smartphone until they pay back whatever assistance they get from the government. There's not even a requirement that they repay. The same goes for small businesses that have been forced to close because of voluntary or state-ordered mitigation efforts in the fight against Covid-19. What makes American Airlines any different?The most common complaint about airlines seeking assistance is that they spent tens of billions of dollars buying back their shares during the past decade. If they hadn't done that, the argument goes, they'd have the money to survive this shock.This specific argument against buybacks has only come about in response to the crisis. For most of the decade, the argument against buybacks was that it was shortchanging investment, and hence, economic growth. I'm not aware of anyone arguing in 2016 that airlines and hotels should hoard cash in preparation for a pandemic rather than buy back their shares.Stockpiling cash also would have been untenable. Activists have spent much of the past decade pushing companies to take more shareholder-friendly actions. Just this month Elliott Management Corp. successfully pressured Twitter to agree to  buy back $2 billion of its shares. Companies that hold excess cash quickly find themselves under assault from activist investors demanding that spare cash be returned to shareholders.Perhaps the public just hates stock buybacks. Maybe the tax code should be changed so that buybacks and dividends are treated equally because there doesn't seem to be the same level of outrage over dividends. AT&T pays more than $10 billion a year in dividends without earning the wrath of the public.In all likelihood, the public anger over aiding large companies stems from both the level of buybacks during the past decade, and lingering resentment over taxpayer assistance to Wall Street in the financial crisis. Banks and investors got bailed out while Main Street was left with a jobless recovery and a decade of subdued wage growth. And during the ensuing decade, the public has rightly felt that big companies went right back to business as usual, focusing on shareholders and executive compensation rather than workers and the common good. It's not hard to see why there might be an uneasy sense of déjà vu, with critics of the financial-crisis bailout seeing an opening to exact some revenge for bad corporate behavior.So it's understandable why there are demands that publicly traded companies seeking government relief should have strings attached to that assistance. What we're going through isn't a typical recession. It's a forced cessation of commerce as a way of fighting a lethal virus. Congress is close to wrapping up a third bill to help the economy weather this storm, but in all likelihood it won't be the last. States and local governments are experiencing a large decline in tax revenue and it may turn out that the $2 trillion in the current package is insufficient. Keeping the public engaged and supportive of new rounds of legislative aid is critical. If part of that effort means shortchanging some investors and limiting executive compensation, that's good politics.To get through this fight, everyone's going to have to give up something. Medical workers are accepting great risk to their own health to treat sick patients. Families are having to cancel vacations and postpone weddings. Parents are working at home while taking care of their kids as schools close for weeks or months. Millions of workers are losing their jobs. Fiscal conservatives are having to stomach trillions of dollars in new spending. Progressives have to accept large companies getting government assistance. If that means executive compensation and shareholders of some companies gets restrained for a while to shore up public support for fiscal bills, nobody should shed any tears.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Conor Sen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is a portfolio manager for New River Investments in Atlanta and has been a contributor to the Atlantic and Business Insider.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • CWA-Represented Employees Vote to Ratify Mobility Southwest Agreement
    PR Newswire

    CWA-Represented Employees Vote to Ratify Mobility Southwest Agreement

    Leadership of Communications Workers of America District 6 has notified AT&T;* that CWA-represented employees have voted to ratify a contract with AT&T; Mobility.

  • TheStreet.com

    ViacomCBS Controlling Holder Restructures Credit Facility With Wells Fargo

    National Amusements, controlling holder of ViacomCBS, reportedly restructured its credit facility because the value of its ViacomCBS shares pledged as collateral fell beneath Wells Fargo's minimum requirement.

  • Broadband Seen as Haven as Investors Seek Stability
    Bloomberg

    Broadband Seen as Haven as Investors Seek Stability

    (Bloomberg) -- The broadband sector could become a safe haven for investors looking to store cash in the event of a financial crisis.Demand for internet access will be recession-proof, if history is an indicator. A Bureau of Labor Statistics analysis from 2009 to 2010 showed total household spending declined year-over-year while computer information and cable services spending increased. That may be even more the case now amid the coronavirus outbreak, as many Americans are working remotely from home and relying on streaming services like Netflix Inc. for entertainment.“The criticality of broadband has increased since the global financial crisis,” Gregory Williams, an analyst covering cable and satellite services at Cowen, said in a note to clients. It’s “now considered a fairly price inelastic utility-like necessity.”AT&T Inc., Charter Communications Inc., Comcast Corp. and Altice USA Inc. are among the long list of potential benefactors providing internet-based services across the U.S. Pure-play businesses like Charter are seen best positioned for upside. Shares of the Stamford, Connecticut-based company have fallen just 8% since the beginning of the year, compared to a 20% decline in the S&P 500 Index.Michael McKenzie, managing director of private investment firm Grain Management, said that broadband connections grew 15% from 2008 to 2009. While there’s no guarantee that will happen this time, the sector is likely to fare better than cable or entertainment peers as consumers look to cut discretionary spending.“I think it’s highly unlikely that [broadband connectivity] declines in a recession,” McKenzie said in an interview. It “should be a safe bet” given its historic stability, he said.McKenzie said there may be some “depressed” spending in certain sectors like hospitality. But in general, stocks linked to mobile network operators and tower owners will “tend to benefit from what we see coming out of this crisis.”(Corrects broadband connection growth in fifth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • AT&T Pays 20% Bonus to Front-line Employees; Extends COVID-19 Relief Support for First Responders, Customers, Schools & Businesses
    PR Newswire

    AT&T Pays 20% Bonus to Front-line Employees; Extends COVID-19 Relief Support for First Responders, Customers, Schools & Businesses

    Keeping America connected is what we've always done and what we'll always do. As the country navigates the COVID-19 health crisis, AT&T;* is continuing its commitment to its employees, customers and first responders by providing several relief offerings.

  • Media M&A Deals on Hold After Outbreak Dries Up Financing
    Bloomberg

    Media M&A Deals on Hold After Outbreak Dries Up Financing

    (Bloomberg) -- Media companies including AT&T Inc. and ViacomCBS Inc. are pressing the pause button on asset sales worth more than $5 billion because of the global coronavirus pandemic, according to people familiar with the matter.AT&T’s auction of four regional sports networks, ViacomCBS’s offloading of its publishing arm and closely-held Ion Media Networks Inc.’s $3.5 billion sale process have been held up amid a downturn in financing markets, the people said, asking not to be identified as the matter is private.ViacomCBS was poised to kick off its sale process for the Simon & Schuster publishing division right before the crisis hit the U.S. ViacomCBS Chief Executive Officer Bob Bakish announced the plan in early March at an investor conference.The company had expected the business to fetch more than $1.2 billion, Bloomberg News had earlier reported. It’s unclear when ViacomCBS will now launch the Simon & Schuster sales process, the people said, who asked not to be identified because the matter is private. The company has received more than 25 indications of interest in the asset since Bakish’s announcement, one of the people added. A ViacomCBS representative declined to comment.AT&T has put on hold its sale of regional sports networks, which includes rights to teams such as hockey’s Pittsburgh Penguins, basketball’s Houston Rockets and baseball’s Seattle Mariners, the people said. AT&T had been seeking close to $1 billion for the assets. Live sports have taken a major hit as professional leagues have suspended play. An AT&T representative declined to comment.AT&T shares were up about 6% at $29.98 and ViacomCBS shares were down 6.4% at $13.80 at 1:45 p.m. in New York.Ion, which had hired advisers this year to sell itself, is also facing delays, according to people familiar with the matter. The company’s owner, hedge fund Black Diamond Capital Management, had been working on a potential $3.5 billion sales process, including debt, according to people familiar with the matter. Representatives for Ion and Black Diamond couldn’t be reached for comment.Ion has 70 stations in markets including Atlanta, Boston, New York and Chicago that reach more than 100 million homes, according to its website. An ad-based independent broadcaster, it primarily airs reruns of shows with no local news or sports.Broadcaster Gray Television Inc. last week withdrew its offer for Tegna Inc. citing the coronavirus, Bloomberg News reported. A number of other bidders are still circling Tegna. Najafi Cos., a private equity firm, last week said it’s teaming up with faith-based broadcaster Trinity Broadcasting Network to make an offer of $20 a share in cash while Apollo Global Management Inc. and TV producer Byron Allen also remain interested.Some smaller deals in the space are also getting done. FuboTV Inc., backed by 21st Century Fox Inc. and AMC Networks Inc., merged with FaceBank Group Inc., on Monday. FuboTV Chief Executive Officer David Gandler said the company wants to sell shares on the Nasdaq exchange as soon as possible so investors can have access to more “stay at home” stocks besides Netflix Inc. and Roku Inc.Deal activity across all sectors have been hit by the virus-induced market turmoil, with the volume of M&A and investment deals sinking 23% to $383 billion in the U.S. this year compared with the same period in 2019, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.(Updates new information on Simon & Schuster in third paragraph, adds share prices in sixth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Blackhall Studios offers space for coronavirus relief, eyes 'hub of healing'
    American City Business Journals

    Blackhall Studios offers space for coronavirus relief, eyes 'hub of healing'

    During this period of inactivity caused by the COVID-19 coronavirus, CEO Ryan Millsap is considering how Blackhall's nearly 650,000 square feet of empty sound stages could be used in the battle against the epidemic. “If you’ve seen the pictures of the temporary shelters they’ve created or the excess capacity temporary hospitals they’ve created in Italy or Spain you could imagine how this could be a really good space for that,” Millsap said as he looked around a barren 30,000 square foot sound stage. Millsap said he offered the space to Gov. Brian Kemp.

  • How AT&T is keeping people connected amid coronavirus crisis
    Yahoo Finance Video

    How AT&T is keeping people connected amid coronavirus crisis

    Yahoo Finance’s Alexis Christoforous, Brian Sozzi, and Dan Howley discuss how the telecommunications industry is navigating through the coronavirus crisis with AT&T Communications CEO Jeff McElfresh.

  • HP CEO on how the company is responding to COVID-19
    Yahoo Finance Video

    HP CEO on how the company is responding to COVID-19

    HP CEO Enrique Lores joins Yahoo Finance’s Alexis Christoforous and Brian Sozzi to discuss how HP is faring amid the coronavirus outbreak and what it is doing to support the U.S. front liners.

  • Telecom Stock Roundup: AT&T Cancels Buyback Plan, Verizon Extends Reach, & More
    Zacks

    Telecom Stock Roundup: AT&T Cancels Buyback Plan, Verizon Extends Reach, & More

    While AT&T (T) withdraws plans to repurchase stock worth $4 billion due to coronavirus, Verizon (VZ) is collaborating with first responders to provide seamless network connectivity.

  • FCC Delays Auction Due to Coronavirus, Gets 500+ Pledges
    Zacks

    FCC Delays Auction Due to Coronavirus, Gets 500+ Pledges

    Some prominent players are going the extra mile to help Americans stay connected during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Tegna: An Interesting Merger Arbitrage Opportunity
    GuruFocus.com

    Tegna: An Interesting Merger Arbitrage Opportunity

    The company has been an acquisition target for a number of media players and is trading more than 30% below its expected acquisition value Continue reading...

  • Reuters

    Television audiences surge to 12-month highs as coronavirus keeps Americans home

    From family drama "This Is Us" to crime series "NCIS," audiences are flocking to television shows in numbers unseen for up to a year as coronavirus shutdowns and social distancing keeps millions of Americans at home. Police action series "NCIS" scored its biggest audience since February 2019 on Tuesday night, attracting some 13.08 million viewers - a 22% increase over its last original broadcast on March 10, CBS said on Wednesday. The Tuesday night season finale of heart-tugging NBC series "This Is Us" was the most-watched episode since September 2019 and saw a 21% increase in viewers aged 18-49 over the previous week, NBC said.

  • FCC Commissioner on how telecommunications are staying strong amid coronavirus
    Yahoo Finance Video

    FCC Commissioner on how telecommunications are staying strong amid coronavirus

    Yahoo Finance’s Editor in Chief Andy Serwer sat down with FCC Commissioner, Brendan Carr to discuss 5G and the strength of the telecommunications industry in the United States during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Barrons.com

    AT&T Temporarily Boosts Pay Rates for 100,000 Union Workers by 20%

    AT&T is part of a growing list of large U.S. employers that are boosting pay in response to increased demand for certain kinds of workers even as many industries shut down.

  •  FCC Commissioner talks about the Secure 5G and Beyond Act
    Yahoo Finance Video

    FCC Commissioner talks about the Secure 5G and Beyond Act

    Commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission Brendan Carr talks with Yahoo Finance's eidtor-in-chief Andy Serwer on a range of topics from coronavirus and the FCC's role to the recently passed Secure 5G and Beyond Act.

  • MoneyShow

    Golds, Resources and Investing in the "New Normal"

    The moves in the financial markets have been gut-wrenching. However, I'm an optimist and I do believe in the ascent of man. Humanity will prevail, asserts Omar Ayales, editor of Gold Charts R Us.