TSCDY - Tesco PLC

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
9.00
+0.11 (+1.21%)
At close: 3:57PM EST
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Previous Close8.89
Open9.02
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range8.98 - 9.05
52 Week Range7.06 - 10.03
Volume75,481
Avg. Volume1,269,517
Market Cap29.416B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.42
PE Ratio (TTM)20.41
EPS (TTM)0.44
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.25 (2.86%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-10-10
1y Target Est8.58
  • CEO exodus hits record as BHP boss jumps ship
    MarketWatch

    CEO exodus hits record as BHP boss jumps ship

    The number of bosses leaving the FTSE 100 reached a record on Thursday after BHP (BHP) announced chief executive Andrew Mackenzie will leave after six years at the helm of the Anglo-Australian miner. A total of 20 bosses from the UK’s blue-chip index of top stocks have been replaced or announced their departures so far this year, according to research by AJ Bell. The same thing is happening across the Atlantic where 172 U.S. chief executives stepped down in October, the highest on record, according to recent research.

  • Barrons.com

    U.K. Grocer Sainsbury Is Making Big Bets. How That Could Boost the Stock.

    After failing to merge with Walmart-owned Asda earlier this year, J Sainsbury is dusting itself off with a plan to cut costs and woo customers with lower prices.

  • Financial Times

    Tesco seeks to gain edge over rivals with Clubcard subscription service

    Tesco has relaunched its Clubcard loyalty scheme with a subscription option, as the UK’s biggest supermarket group looks to gain an edge in the fiercely competitive sector. Clubcard, launched in 1995, was pivotal in helping Tesco overtake J Sainsbury to become the UK’s largest supermarket group. From Friday customers can opt to pay £7.99 a month for Clubcard Plus in return for a range of discounts on Tesco products along with the group’s banking and mobile phone services.

  • Britain's Tesco takes on discounters with paid-for loyalty card
    Reuters

    Britain's Tesco takes on discounters with paid-for loyalty card

    Tesco will next week become the first major British supermarket group to offer a subscription customer loyalty scheme, the latest weapon in its fight to stem the market share gains of German-owned discounters. Along with other leading UK grocers Sainsbury's , Asda (part of Walmart ) and Morrisons , Tesco has been losing share to Aldi [ALDIEI.UL] and Lidl, who have been aggressively opening new stores. The big four have been fighting back with initiatives that aim to differentiate their offers versus the discounters, and Tesco, Britain's biggest retailer, said on Tuesday it would launch an enhanced version of its Clubcard scheme from Nov. 8.

  • Barrons.com

    Beyond Meat Earnings Are Coming. Here’s What to Expect.

    Beyond Meat has been an incredible story in 2019. And another chapter will be written when the company reports third quarter earnings after the close of trading on Oct. 28.

  • Reuters

    Lidl to spend $19 bln over 5 years with British suppliers

    German-owned discount supermarket Lidl GB has vowed to spend 15 billion pounds ($19 billion) with British suppliers over the next five years, commiting to increase sales of local meat, poultry and fresh produce. Lidl and rival Aldi have changed the shape of the UK grocery sector, stealing market share from industry leader Tesco, Sainsbury's, Asda and Morrisons by offering cut-throat prices in no-frills stores. To deepen its relations with British suppliers, Lidl, part of the Schwarz retail group, said it would introduce longer-term contracts with suppliers to help them invest and expand.

  • Here are the ‘oppressive’ working conditions at the farms that supply Whole Foods, report shows
    MarketWatch

    Here are the ‘oppressive’ working conditions at the farms that supply Whole Foods, report shows

    The charity claims that laborers that supply Whole Foods reported working up to 14 hours a day in “oppressive heat with few rest breaks,” and often with “very limited access to toilets.”

  • In turbulent times, Tesco's new boss has something to build on
    Reuters

    In turbulent times, Tesco's new boss has something to build on

    When the little known Ken Murphy takes over next year as CEO of Tesco , Britain's biggest retailer, he will inherit something current boss Dave Lewis did not have the luxury of when he joined in 2014 - a strategy and a stable business. When former Unilever executive Lewis became CEO of Tesco on Sept. 1, 2014, the supermarket group was already reeling from a dramatic downturn in trading. Fast forward five years and Lewis, 54, has declared Tesco's turnaround complete.

  • Tesco Boss Leaves Before His Sell-By Date
    Bloomberg

    Tesco Boss Leaves Before His Sell-By Date

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- In the five years since Tesco Plc was plunged into the biggest crisis in its history, Dave Lewis, its chief executive officer, has executed an (almost) textbook turnaround of Britain’s biggest retailer.He’s now decided that his job is done and he will hand over the reins next year to Ken Murphy of Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc.“Drastic Dave” — a moniker Lewis picked up because of his cost-cutting zeal in a former job at Unilever Plc — took Tesco out of intensive care. He revived sales growth, restored profit, cut debt and reinstated the dividend. The shares are 18% higher than they were back in 2014, when Tesco announced a bombshell 250 million-pound ($307 million) profit black hole. That stock price increase is twice that of the FTSE 100 index.There’s still a vague sense of disappointment, though. One might have expected some Lewis initiatives, such as taking prices closer to those of the German-owned discount grocers Aldi and Lidl, to bear more fruit. While Tesco is managing to grind out incremental growth in an ever-more-competitive market, it’s hard to get too excited by that.Lewis did deliver on his key turnaround target: lifting the company’s operating margin to between 3.5% and 4% six months earlier than expected. So he’s making the wise move for a CEO of going out on a high note.But it’s curious that he didn’t appear to be in the running for two other high-profile CEO posts that have been filled recently, at the consumer goods giants Unilever Plc and Reckitt Benckiser Group Plc. Lewis doesn’t have another job to go to and plans to take some time off before thinking about his next move.The choice of replacement is certainly a surprise. Lewis’s natural successor was Charles Wilson, the popular ex-boss of Booker, which Tesco bought in 2018. However, he stepped back from running Tesco’s British arm last year due to illness. Murphy was joint chief operating officer at Walgreens’ British pharmacy chain Boots before being promoted at the American parent. So he does have experience in the fiercely competitive U.K. retail market.Still, he has no direct experience of the cutthroat grocery sector, which has been transformed by the price-slashing antics of Aldi and Lidl. This is Tesco’s greatest challenge. At least Murphy will benefit from the advice of Wilson, who still has a senior role at Tesco.While the supermarket giant has prospered from the weakness of its great rival J Sainsbury Plc, the latter appears to have gotten its act together lately. And while the British shopper has remained pretty immune to Brexit so far, a no-deal departure from the European Union might change that.It won’t be easy to balance these challenges against an investor base that’s expecting a special dividend or buybacks from next year. Already Tesco’s U.K. sales growth has slowed. That may reflect a broader deceleration across the grocery market, after a strong 2018, but a slowdown is a slowdown. Shareholders are naturally cautious about the management change, although the stock did rise 2% in a falling London market on Wednesday.At least Lewis didn’t hang around beyond his sell-by date, unlike so many other CEOs.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesco reports profit rise and exit of CEO Dave Lewis
    MarketWatch

    Tesco reports profit rise and exit of CEO Dave Lewis

    Lewis, who said the decision to leave was a personal one, will be succeeded by Ken Murphy, the company said. Murphy brings with him a wealth of commercial, marketing and brand experience within retail and wholesale business, Tesco said.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 4-Job done - Tesco boss to quit next year

    Tesco boss Dave Lewis, credited with saving Britain's biggest retailer from collapse in 2014, will step down next summer after declaring its turnaround complete, handing over to a relative unknown catapulted into one of the sector's top jobs. Celebrating its 100th anniversary, Tesco is five years into a recovery plan launched by Lewis after an accounting scandal capped a dramatic downturn in trading. Successor Ken Murphy, a former executive at healthcare group Walgreens Boots Alliance, will become the second outsider to lead Tesco, following in the footsteps of former Unilever executive Lewis.

  • Job done - Tesco boss to quit next year
    Reuters

    Job done - Tesco boss to quit next year

    Tesco boss Dave Lewis, credited with saving Britain's biggest retailer from collapse in 2014, will step down next summer after declaring its turnaround complete, handing over to a relative unknown catapulted into one of the sector's top jobs. Celebrating its 100th anniversary, Tesco is five years into a recovery plan launched by Lewis after an accounting scandal capped a dramatic downturn in trading. Successor Ken Murphy, a former executive at healthcare group Walgreens Boots Alliance , will become the second outsider to lead Tesco, following in the footsteps of former Unilever executive Lewis.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 3-Aldi focused on British sales with $1.25 bln growth plan

    German discount supermarket group Aldi plans to pump 1 billion pounds ($1.25 billion) into Britain, chasing market share at the expense of profit, which dropped by 26% last year as it pursued sales growth, store openings and new customers. Britain's fifth biggest supermarket, which is privately owned by Germany's Aldi Sud, signalled no let-up for its larger rivals as it reaffirmed a commitment to investing in the UK, despite a low price pledge denting its 2018 profit. Aldi UK, which trades from about 840 stores and has a grocery market share of 8.1%, said sales increased 11% in 2018 and it gained 800,000 new customers.

  • Reuters

    RPT-Stockpiles of tomatoes? UK retailers bristle at demands of no-deal Brexit

    A British demand for supermarkets to prepare for a potentially chaotic no-deal Brexit by stockpiling food is stoking anger in the industry, with bosses saying they should not be blamed if people can't find everything they want on the shelves. With British politics spiralling towards an unpredictable endgame, makers of food and drugs are having to restructure operations in case the arrival of customs checks shatters supply chains, clogs ports and delays deliveries. The food industry has warned that their stockpiling can only go so far, and executives have expressed incredulity at Michael Gove, the minister in charge of no-deal Brexit planning, who vowed this month that there would be no shortages of fresh food if Britain leaves the European Union (EU) without agreement on Oct. 31.

  • VMWare (VMW) Just “Struck Oil” – Here’s How to Invest
    InvestorPlace

    VMWare (VMW) Just “Struck Oil” – Here’s How to Invest

    VMWare's (NYSE:VMW) meteoric rise after inking a key partnership a couple years ago just goes to show: "Data is the new oil."That phrase was first coined in 2006 by a British statistician named Clive Humby. He should know; he created the first supermarket loyalty card on behalf of Tesco (OTCMKTS:TSCDY). And with the data gleaned from that "Clubcard" program, the U.K. grocery chain doubled its market share from 1994 to 1995 alone. Talk about a valuable commodity!These days, companies like VMWare are crucial in keeping this gravy train going. And VMW stock is up roughly 70% for us at Growth Investor.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsThe "VM" in "VMWare" stands for virtual machines, which is software that solves a big problem for many businesses: too many servers.The more your company grows, the more data storage you need, but multiple servers quickly become a major headache - and costly. Instead, you can just log into VMWare, and do all your computing on one server. Things run faster and more efficiently, with less confusion. No wonder VMWare grew both earnings and revenue (+12% year-over-year) in the second quarter, both of which beat Wall Street expectations. * 7 Stocks to Buy In a Flat Market Now, these days, many companies don't keep their own servers, or even rent space in a data center…they just use cloud (online) storage. Or they use some combination of the three. And when it comes to this "hybrid cloud," VMWare has pretty much cornered the market.That's thanks to a historic partnership with one of my other Growth Investor picks: Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN). You might think of Amazon more for online shopping, or to buy e-books for your Kindle. Well, these days, its biggest profit driver is actually Amazon Web Services (AWS).VMWare was already a leader in the cloud computing field; it is the infrastructure platform choice of 100% of the Fortune 500\. It also has strong marketing relationships with computer hardware vendors, like Dell Technologies (NYSE:DELL), HP Inc. (NYSE:HPQ) and IBM (NYSE:IBM). Now that this "private cloud" company has partnered with Amazon's "public cloud" service, customers don't need to choose.Below you can see VMWare's products for your data center and for VMWare Cloud, plus Amazon's own cloud services - and how they can all interact. For Big Data, VMWare and AWS is a "one-stop shop."Source: VMWare.comHospitals, banks, car companies, the Make-a-Wish foundation, even candy companies and colleges all use VMWare to make their data operations more modern (and thus more secure).There's just one final frontier for VMWare and AWS (and their customers): the "mother of all technologies." Crunching the NumbersUp until now, technologies have certainly made our lives easier and more efficient…but with a lot of room for human error. People trip over cords, spill their coffee, and get tired.Artificial intelligence (A.I.) does not.As scientists find even more applications for artificial intelligence - from healthcare to retail to self-driving cars - it's incredible to imagine how much data will be involved.To create A.I. programs in the first place, tech companies must collect vast amounts of data on human decisions. Data is what powers every A.I. system.So any one company that can help with customers' data issues - is the one company that's most worth investing in.After all, in the 2003 oil boom, investors could either speculate on oil futures contracts… or they could have bought shares in Core Laboratories (NYSE:CLB).Core did no drilling or exploration of its own. It provided technology to lots of companies who did. And as oil prices climbed from $30 per barrel in 2003 to $100 per barrel in 2008, Core's customers had more money to spend on exploration. Along with that, CLB stock rose 1,100%…with less risk.Now, picture an industry like Big Oil as a huge skyscraper with lots of offices. By buying stock in an individual oil company, it's like having a key to one of those offices. By buying Core Laboratories, it's like having a "Master Key" to all of them. The A.I. "Master Key"Core Laboratories was the Master Key to the 2000s oil boom. And here, the Master Key is the company that makes the "brain" that all A.I. software needs to function, spot patterns, and interpret data.It's known as the "Volta Chip." Last week, VMWare just signed a big deal with this very company -- and its Volta Chip is what makes the A.I. revolution possible.Some of the biggest players in elite investing circles have large stakes in the A.I. Master Key: * Ron Baron, billionaire money manager with one of the biggest estates in the Hamptons. * Ken Fisher, author of The Ten Roads to Riches and other bestsellers, who's made the Forbes 400 Richest Americans list. * Mario Gabelli, namesake of the Gabelli Funds, with a salary of $85 million for one year -- Wall Street's highest paid CEO.None of them, however, are programmers…or any kind of tech guru. You don't need to be an A.I. expert to take part. I'll tell you everything you need to know, as well as my buy recommendation, in my special report for Growth Investor, The A.I. Master Key. The stock is still under my buy limit price -- so you'll want to sign up now; that way, you can get in while you can still do so cheaply.Click here for a free briefing on this groundbreaking innovation.Louis Navellier had an unconventional start, as a grad student who accidentally built a market-beating stock system -- with returns rivaling even Warren Buffett. In his latest feat, Louis discovered the "Master Key" to profiting from the biggest tech revolution of this (or any) generation. Louis Navellier may hold some of the aforementioned securities in one or more of his newsletters. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Deeply Discounted Energy Stocks to Buy * 7 Stocks to Buy In a Flat Market * 10 Stocks to Buy to Ride China's Emerging Wealth The post VMWare (VMW) Just "Struck Oil" - Here's How to Invest appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • A Plastic-Free Future Starts With Your Groceries
    Bloomberg

    A Plastic-Free Future Starts With Your Groceries

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- At a Waitrose grocery store in Oxford, England, shoppers are scooping up frozen fruit from dispensers like pick and mix candy. They are filling old plastic takeaway containers with everything from muesli to risotto rice. Welcome to Unpacked, the new store concept from Waitrose, which has freed more than 200 items from their packaging.Environmental campaigners like Greenpeace have been demanding British supermarkets reduce their plastic footprint. But it’s trickier to strip wrappings from food than other products, such as toys, because it can go off. The packaging conundrum facing grocers only compounds another problem they’re grappling with: food waste.But they are making strides to be green, from eliminating hard-to-recycle materials, such as PVC, to enabling customers to remove and recycle wrappings before products leave the store. Some are even offering reverse vending machines to recycle plastic bottles. Tesco Plc said recently that it could no longer stock items if they had too much packaging and is working with suppliers to help them find ways to use less.It’s easier to design plastic-free packaging for products sold at room temperature. As well as dry goods, consumers can easily refill containers for household and personal care items like cleaning supplies or shampoo. Fresh food is much trickier. Meat, for example, will not last long if it isn’t wrapped to protect it from the air. Fresh fruit and vegetables are another challenge because they can be damaged during transport. Even so, Unpacked sells 160 types of loose fruit and vegetables. Seasonality presents another problem. For example, Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc sources cucumbers from the U.K. in the summer. With the shorter supply chain, they don’t need any packaging. In cooler months, they come from Spain, so they need a thin recyclable film; Morrison makes it clear to customers that the cucumbers have their winter jackets on.One way to extend shelf lives without plastic is to grow products even nearer to the end customer. Vertical farming, which uses stacked trays under LED lights to grow different kinds of food indoors, is one option. Ocado Group Plc, the online supermarket, recently made two investments in this space, including buying 58% of Jones Food Co., Europe’s largest operating vertical farm, based in Scunthorpe, England.Jones primarily grows herbs, packing them in biodegradable and compostable materials within air that has had some of the elements removed. This tricks the plants into thinking that they haven’t been harvested, keeping them fresher for longer.Vertical farms could be built next to supermarkets or online grocery distribution centers to shorten supply chains, reduce packaging and cut down on transportation and refrigeration.Supermarkets are finding other products more difficult to make environmentally friendly. Surprisingly, one is ready meals. They contain liquids and must be kept fresh, while their packaging needs to be able to withstand cooking in both an oven and a microwave.Waitrose has spent more than five years developing a fiber-based packaging that is compostable. It has also introduced trays made from recycled plastic. These come in different colors, depending on the material they’re made from, and don’t have the uniform look that customers are used to.Indeed, while supermarkets must change their behavior to be more sustainable, so must shoppers: For example, a cucumber wrapped in plastic will last about 14 days. One without keeps for about half that time.Morrison has introduced reusable paper carrier bags, but recently began trialing plastic alternatives costing 30 pence each — a higher price than usually charged — prompting complaints from some customers.Waitrose has made sure it’s possible to do a full shop at its 25,000 square foot Unpacked store to help customers be more sustainable without disrupting their everyday lives. So far it’s working: Products without packaging are outselling those that still have it. Some 50% of customers using the refill stations for dry goods are bringing their own containers on a regular basis. All of the U.K. supermarkets are coming under pressure to be more sustainable. So far, 1.4 million people have signed Greenpeace’s petition calling on them to to ditch throwaway plastic packaging. They have more work to do. But so do Britain’s consumers.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Stephanie Baker at stebaker@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.