TSN - Tyson Foods, Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
60.94
+2.53 (+4.33%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT

60.13 -0.81 (-1.33%)
After hours: 5:22PM EDT

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Momentum

Momentum

Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close58.41
Open59.00
Bid61.13 x 4000
Ask60.95 x 1200
Day's Range59.00 - 61.64
52 Week Range42.57 - 94.24
Volume2,635,166
Avg. Volume3,736,007
Market Cap22.245B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.69
PE Ratio (TTM)11.00
EPS (TTM)5.54
Earnings DateMay 03, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield1.68 (2.88%)
Ex-Dividend DateMay 28, 2020
1y Target Est86.55
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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  • Reuters

    FOCUS-As fever checks become the norm in coronavirus era, demand for thermal cameras soars

    Many businesses around the globe have halted or reduced operations to help combat the spread of the novel coronavirus which causes the sometimes fatal COVID-19 respiratory illness. Major employers such as Tyson Foods Inc and Intel Corp are experimenting with thermal cameras to ensure workers do not enter factories with potential illness, a critical part of maintaining production during the pandemic that could become more widespread as economies reopen. Thermal camera companies such as U.S.-based FLIR Systems Inc, UK-based Thermoteknix Systems Ltd and Israel's Opgal Optronic Industries Ltd say the surge in interest has caused a sales spike - with some tripling quarterly revenue or selling as many units in a few weeks as they had in more than five years.

  • Reuters

    Smithfield Foods closes U.S. pork plant due to new coronavirus

    Smithfield Foods Inc, the world's biggest pork processor, said on Thursday it is temporarily closing a plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, because of the new coronavirus, the latest disruption to the U.S. food supply chain from the outbreak. The plant has a total of 3,700 workers, Smithfield said. Tyson Foods Inc said on Monday it closed a pork plant in Columbus Junction, Iowa, after more than 24 cases of COVID-19 involving employees at the facility.

  • U.S. to probe surging beef prices, falling cattle prices during coronavirus pandemic
    Reuters

    U.S. to probe surging beef prices, falling cattle prices during coronavirus pandemic

    The U.S. Agriculture Department will investigate why a surge in beef prices because of coronavirus hoarding did not translate into higher cattle prices for farmers, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said on Wednesday. The investigation adds scrutiny on the small group of meat companies like Tyson Foods Inc and Cargill Inc that dominate U.S. beef processing. "This is a good decision to address potentially unfair practices," Republican U.S. Senator Deb Fischer of Nebraska said on Twitter.

  • Bloomberg

    Deaths Expose Fears for Strength of U.S. Food-Supply Chain

    (Bloomberg) -- Some of the workers who help produce America’s food are starting to die because of the coronavirus.At least three people who worked at plants owned by top U.S. meat packer Tyson Foods Inc. and a local unit of Brazil’s JBS SA were reported to have died from the pandemic. Companies including Cargill Inc., Sanderson Farms Inc. and Perdue Farms Inc. have also reported infections. Smithfield Foods Inc. has 80 cases at a facility in South Dakota.While it’s unclear whether the deaths and other cases had anything to with the workplace, the news exposes the fragility of global supply chains that are needed to keep grocery stores stocked after panic buying left shelves empty. Vice President Mike Pence said Tuesday that these workers are “vital,” calling on them to “show up and do your job” to keep the nation fed.Plants across the U.S. are starting to reduce output or idle as cases spread from the main cities to rural America. Outbreaks have occurred in factories across the country in recent weeks, with hundreds of workers being sent home.Laborers have, in some cases, staged walk-outs to protest working conditions. In meat plants, stations on processing lines can be close together, creating challenges for social distancing. Workers share break rooms and locker rooms.“Going to work is putting them at great risk,” said Angela Stuesse, an anthropology professor at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. “Who benefits? All of us who are buying food, and the corporations who are selling it.”On Tuesday, the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union representing thousands of poultry workers said two of its members working at a Tyson plant in Camilla, Georgia, died from the virus. JBS USA confirmed a long-time employee at its Greeley, Colorado, died of Covid-19 complications.It’s unclear where they were infected. JBS said the employee in question had not been at work since March 20 and that he didn’t present any symptoms while at work. Springdale, Arkansas-based Tyson didn’t comment on the deaths.Plant disruptions are also hitting American farmers. Fears of closures first sent cattle futures traded in Chicago tumbling, but prices are now rebounding as traders wait to see just how long the problems will last.“This was a case of buying the rumor and selling the fact,” said Steve Wagner, market analyst at CHS Hedging in Minnesota. “The market went down on the fear that packers were going to close plants and, when they closed, we bounced back.”Meat companies have been upping safety procedures to keep the virus from spreading among its ranks. Tyson said it has been taking employee temperatures before they enter facilities, stepped up deep cleaning at its plants, implemented social distancing measures and given workers access to protective face coverings.“We continue working diligently to protect our team members at Camilla and elsewhere,” according to a statement Tuesday. “Since the U.S. government considers Tyson Foods a critical infrastructure company, we take our responsibility to continue feeding the nation very seriously.”Maple Leaf Suspends Poultry Plant Operations Amid Virus CasesJBS said it has implemented safety measures including increasing sanitation efforts, deep cleaning of facilities, promoting social distancing and checking temperatures before employees enter facilities. It has also implemented a policy removing high-risk populations, including those over 70, from its facilities.The U.S. Chicken Council added its members are doing everything they can to keep their employees safe and product on the shelves.The coronavirus, which has claimed more than 81,000 lives globally, is spreading into America’s food-making heartlands. At a press conference Tuesday, Pence said the government will “work tirelessly” to ensure workplaces for food-company employees are safe.“You are giving a great service to the people of the United States of America and we need you to continue, as a part of what we call critical infrastructure, to show up and do your job,” he said.Cargill said Tuesday it was idling a beef plant in Pennsylvania after employees tested positive for Covid-19. The announcement came a day after Tyson said it had halted pork processing at a plant in Iowa after more than two dozen workers tested positive. JBS suspended operations until April 16 at a beef plant in Pennsylvania after several managers showed symptoms.Coronavirus cases aren’t limited to meat plants. Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., one of the world’s largest agricultural commodity traders, said Monday that four employees at its corn processing complex in Clinton, Iowa, tested positive for the virus. The company says it has less than 20 cases globally. Walmart Inc. was also faced with employee deaths.(Updates with 80 cases at Smithfield’s plant in second paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Covid-19 has shut down parts of the hyper-consolidated US meat industry
    Quartz

    Covid-19 has shut down parts of the hyper-consolidated US meat industry

    When just a handful of companies supply most US meat, a single plant problem has an outsized impact.

  • Bloomberg

    U.S. Sees First Food-Worker Deaths; ‘You Are Vital,’ Pence Says

    (Bloomberg) -- Just hours after a labor union reported what may be the first poultry-worker deaths associated with the coronavirus in the U.S., Vice President Mike Pence urged American food workers to continue to “show up and do your job.”“You are vital,” he said during a press conference late Tuesday. “You are giving a great service to the people of the United States of America and we need you to continue, as a part of what we call critical infrastructure, to show up and do your job.” In return, Pence said, the government will “work tirelessly” to ensure their workplaces are safe.Pence’s remarks came just hours after the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union that represents thousands of poultry-processing workers across the southern U.S. reported that two members at a Tyson Foods Inc. facility in Camilla, Georgia, had died from the virus. It was unclear whether they were infected while at work.JBS USA on Wednesday confirmed the death of an employee that worked at its Greeley, Colorado, plant, citing complications associated with Covid-19. The company is a unit of JBS SA, the world’s biggest meat company.Tyson said the company has been taking employee temperatures before they enter facilities, stepped up deep cleaning at its plants, implemented social distancing measures and given workers access to protective face coverings. The company didn’t comment on the deaths Tuesday or again Wednesday.“We continue working diligently to protect our team members at Camilla and elsewhere,” the Springdale, Arkansas-based company said by email Tuesday. “Since the U.S. government considers Tyson Foods a critical infrastructure company, we take our responsibility to continue feeding the nation very seriously.”Maple Leaf Suspends Poultry Plant Operations Amid Virus CasesThe JBS employee had worked for the company for more than 30 years, and a spokesman said the firm is offering support to the family and team members.The coronavirus, which has claimed more than 81,000 lives globally, is spreading into America’s food-making heartlands. Shortly after Pence spoke, food giant Cargill Inc. said it was idling a beef plant in Pennsylvania after employees tested positive for Covid-19, joining the ranks of food companies across the U.S. shutting or reducing operations as the outbreak sickens more of their ranks and begins to affect production.The slowdowns have fanned fears of potential food shortages just as supply chain disruptions are already keeping some basic goods such as beef, rice and pasta off grocery shelves. The U.S. Chicken Council said its members are doing everything they can to keep their employees safe and product on the shelves.On Monday, Tyson said it had halted pork processing at a plant in Iowa after more than two dozen workers tested positive. JBS suspended operations until April 16 at a beef plant in Pennsylvania after several managers showed symptoms. Other producers have faced everything from worker walkouts to hundreds of employees quarantined to people calling out of the job.Coronavirus cases aren’t limited to meat plants. Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., one of the world’s largest agricultural commodity traders, said Monday that four employees at its corn processing complex in Clinton, Iowa, tested positive for the virus. The company says it has less than 20 cases globally.Walmart Inc. was also faced with employee deaths. (Updates with death of JBS worker in fourth paragraph. A previous version of this story corrected location of Tyson’s headquarters.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    Cargill shuts U.S. meat plant that serves grocery stores due to COVID-19

    Cargill Inc closed a U.S. meat plant until further notice on Tuesday, the company said, disrupting the food supply for grocery stores that have seen demand surge as the country battles the new coronavirus. The facility in Hazleton, Pennsylvania, produces meat for retail food customers, Cargill said in a statement. The products include ground beef, steaks, beef roasts and pork products that are sold at grocery stores across the country, according to the company's website.

  • Reuters

    Side effects: Fuel demand crash shuts U.S. ethanol plants, meatpackers lack refrigerant

    A slew of U.S. ethanol plants have shut down as fuel demand has collapsed during the coronavirus outbreak, and meatpackers have been hit by a worrying side-effect: less carbon dioxide is now available to chill beef, poultry and pork. "We're headed for a train wreck in terms of the CO2 market," said Geoff Cooper, president of the Renewable Fuels Association industry group. The RFA said 29 of the 45 U.S. ethanol plants that sell carbon dioxide, or CO2, have idled or cut rates.

  • Tyson Foods Suspends Iowa Plant Operations Due to Coronavirus
    Zacks

    Tyson Foods Suspends Iowa Plant Operations Due to Coronavirus

    Tyson Foods (TSN) suspends operations in its pork plant at the Columbus Junction, Iowa. Nonetheless, the company will shift the livestock supplies to other pork plants in the area.

  • Bloomberg

    Tyson, JBS Closures Show Virus Hitting American Meat Production

    (Bloomberg) -- Major U.S. meat plants are starting to take more drastic measures to deal with the coronavirus pandemic, fanning concerns of supply disruptions at a time when Americans are stocking up on food.On Monday, Tyson Foods Inc. said it halted pork processing at a plant in Iowa after more than two dozen workers tested positive for Covid-19. JBS SA suspended operations until April 16 at a beef plant in Pennsylvania after several managers showed symptoms. Other producers have seen everything from walkouts to hundreds of staff quarantined.The temporary shutdowns come as the virus spreads to rural areas that are the heart of U.S. food production. In the early stages of the outbreak, producers opted to keep plants running when workers got sick by identifying specific areas where infected people had direct contact.Tyson’s meat and poultry plants are experiencing “varying levels” of impact to production, the company said in a statement. More workers are failing to show up to shifts, and additional sanitation efforts to keep people safe are spurring temporary closures, Chief Executive Officer Noel White said.In the case of the Iowa plant, hogs are being sent to other pork facilities in the region to minimize disruption.Meanwhile, Tyson is asking federal agencies for more personal protective equipment for its workers and trying to secure supplies of face coverings, White said.“We’re working hard to protect our team members during this ever-changing situation, while also ensuring we continue fulfilling our critical role of helping feed people across the country,” he said.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Tyson Foods to Hold Q2 Earnings Call on May 4

    SPRINGDALE, Ark., April 06, 2020 -- Tyson Foods, Inc. (NYSE: TSN) will hold its second quarter 2020 earnings call Monday, May 4 at 9 a.m. Eastern. We encourage participants to.

  • TheStreet.com

    Tyson Implements Temperature Taking and Other Precautions, Cutting Some Output

    Tyson Foods' production has been reduced as the foods producer takes precautions to protect staff against coronavirus. It's taking the temperature of workers before they enter facilities and boosting its deep-cleaning and sanitizing of its facilities.

  • Reuters

    Two Iowa meat plants close as coronavirus outbreak spreads

    Tyson Foods Inc said on Monday it shut an Iowa hog slaughterhouse after more than 24 cases of COVID-19 involving employees at the facility, in the latest disruption to the U.S. food supply chain from the coronavirus outbreak. Reduced meat output as the country battles COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the virus, threatens to tighten supplies of certain products at a time when demand is soaring from consumers at grocery stores. Tyson said it will divert hogs to other pork plants in an attempt to minimize the disruption from the closure of its slaughterhouse in Columbus Junction, Iowa, this week.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Tyson Foods CEO Provides Update on Efforts to Address COVID-19

    In addition, we’ve stepped up deep cleaning and sanitizing of our facilities, especially in employee breakrooms, locker rooms and other areas, to protect our team members. Founded in 1935 by John W. Tyson and grown under three generations of family leadership, the company has a broad portfolio of products and brands like Tyson®, Jimmy Dean®, Hillshire Farm®, Ball Park®, Wright®, Aidells®, ibp® and State Fair®.

  • Tyson Foods Paying $60 Million To Drivers, Frontline Workers
    Benzinga

    Tyson Foods Paying $60 Million To Drivers, Frontline Workers

    Tyson Foods, Inc. (NYSE: TSN) announced a "thank you" to its 116,000 frontline U.S. workers and drivers that are "feeding the nation" during the COVID-19 outbreak.The Springdale, Arkansas-based company announced that it will allocate approximately $60 million in bonuses to eligible "frontline workers and Tyson truckers" in a March 31 press release. The company will make the $500 bonus payments during the first week of July."We're proud of how our team members have stepped up during this challenging time to make sure we continue fulfilling our critical mission of feeding people across America," said Tyson Foods CEO Noel White.In recent days, other transportation companies have increased benefits available to employees serving during the outbreak. On March 24, XPO Logistics, Inc. (NYSE: XPO) announced that it will provide an additional two weeks of paid sick leave. On March 23, J.B. Hunt Transport Services Inc. (NASDAQ: JBHT) said that it would pay a one-time $500 bonus to drivers and operations support personnel. On March 20, Landstar System Inc. (NASDAQ: LSTR) said that it would pay its business capacity owners (BCOs) who were diagnosed with the virus or required to quarantine ,000 per week for up to two weeks.Tyson Foods' latest announcement follows other actions the company has taken in recent weeks. Tyson Foods previously waived the five-day waiting period for disability benefits as well as deductibles for telemedicine and co-pays for COVID-19 testing.The company recently pledged million in support to the communities where it has facilities for immediate needs like "rent and utility assistance, food distribution, healthcare, childcare, small business support and other economic recovery services."Tyson Foods is one of the world's largest food companies with 141,000 employees globally, generating more than $42 billion in sales annually. The company has more than 2,900 drivers and 2,700 power units, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's SAFER system."Our team members are leading the charge to continue providing food to the nation. The bonuses are another way we can say ‘thank you' for their efforts," concluded White.See more from Benzinga * North American Carloads Of Motor Vehicles And Parts Plummet * UBS Sees April, May Freight 'Falloff' * As Plants In Texas And Mexico Close, Cross-Border Freight Slowdown Looms(C) 2020 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

  • MarketWatch

    Tyson Foods to pay $500 bonus to employees, truckers for working through coronavirus pandemic

    Tyson Foods Inc. said late Tuesday it will pay about $60 million in bonuses to 116,000 employees and truckers amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Eligible employees are to receive a $500 bonus, payable during the first week of July, the food producer said. Tyson recently adjusted its attendance policy to "encourage" employees to stay at home if they have symptoms of COVID-19 infection and is taking "additional precautionary measures" at its factories, it said. "Our team members are leading the charge to continue providing food to the nation," White said. "The bonuses are another way we can say 'thank you' for their efforts." Tyson said it has restricted visitor access to its facilities and is offering protective face coverings for production workers who request them. The company did not detail which employees would be eligible to receive the bonus.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Tyson Foods to Provide Approximately $60 Million in Bonuses for Frontline Workers

    Tyson Foods, Inc. (TSN) today announced it will pay approximately $60 million in “thank you” bonuses to 116,000 frontline workers and Tyson truckers in the U.S. who support the company’s operations every day to provide food during the COVID-19 pandemic. Eligible team members will receive a $500 bonus, payable during the first week of July. The bonuses are in addition to other company-announced efforts to support workers, plant communities and livestock producers during the global pandemic.

  • U.S. senators scrutinize meat packers' big profits during pandemic
    Reuters

    U.S. senators scrutinize meat packers' big profits during pandemic

    U.S. senators are calling for investigations of record profit margins for beef processors like Tyson Foods and Cargill, after ranchers complained surging meat prices due to coronavirus hoarding did not translate into higher cattle prices. Futures prices for cattle have tumbled during the outbreak, worrying farmers as the U.S. economy heads into a downturn and fueling questions about whether the market run by CME Group is an effective tool for risk management. Senator Charles Grassley of Iowa wrote on Twitter that U.S. Department of Agriculture, Department of Justice and Commodity Futures Trading Commission probes may be needed to determine why ranchers did not benefit from soaring meat demand.

  • MoneyShow

    Which Stocks will Recover First

    Which industries might recover more quickly that others? asks Crista Huff, growth and income expert and editor of Cabot Undervalued Stocks Advisor.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Tyson Foods Commits $13 Million in COVID-19 Hunger Relief and Community Support

    Tyson Foods, Inc. (TSN) is committing $13 million to support critical needs in local communities where the company operates in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the company announced today. This investment includes $2 million in community grants and more than $11 million worth of products donated by the company since March 11. The company has created a Community Response Fund that will distribute grants and food donations to non-profit organizations working to help people in Tyson Foods’ plant communities across the U.S. Community grants will be awarded by invitation only.

  • Top Consumer Staples Stocks for April 2020
    Investopedia

    Top Consumer Staples Stocks for April 2020

    These are the consumer staples stocks with the best value, fastest growth, and most momentum for April.

  • Reuters

    Who needs Instacart? U.S. farmers expand food deliveries during coronavirus outbreak

    CHICAGO/OKLAHOMA CITY, March 25 (Reuters) - Farmers in rural America are expanding food delivery services to meet rising demand from consumers seeking to isolate themselves during the coronavirus pandemic and frustrated by empty grocery-store shelves. Food suppliers are being forced to adapt as the outbreak has shut restaurants, bars and schools and is sending shoppers looking for reliable sources for goods from meat to vegetables. Farmers said they had supplies and were seeing an uptick in demand for home deliveries in areas where grocery delivery services like Instacart and Amazon.com's AmazonFresh are not widely available.

  • Inside the C-Suite: How Tyson Food is pivoting its factories to deal with retail industry
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Inside the C-Suite: How Tyson Food is pivoting its factories to deal with retail industry

    Yahoo Finance's Alexis Christoforous spoke with Tyson Foods CEO Noel White about how the company is deaeling with the coronavirus pandemic.