VLKAF - Volkswagen AG

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
186.00
-1.04 (-0.56%)
At close: 2:38PM EST
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Previous Close187.04
Open184.50
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range184.50 - 189.35
52 Week Range155.66 - 204.99
Volume72
Avg. Volume1,627
Market Cap93.78B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.58
PE Ratio (TTM)6.10
EPS (TTM)30.51
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield5.36 (2.87%)
Ex-Dividend DateMay 12, 2019
1y Target EstN/A
  • Reuters

    RPT-China's auto sales may fall 10% in H1 due to coronavirus - industry association

    China's auto market, the world's largest, is likely to see sales slide more than 10% in the first half of the year due to the coronavirus epidemic, the country's top auto industry body told Reuters on Friday. "We predict auto sales will drop by more than 10% in the first half of this year, and around 5% for the whole year if the epidemic is effectively contained before April," Fu Bingfeng, executive vice chairman of the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers (CAAM), told Reuters in a written interview. Auto executives say the coronavirus, which has killed more than 1,380 people and infected nearly 64,000 in mainland China, is taking a severe toll on the industry, sapping buyer demand and disrupting supply chains for car makers globally.

  • Reuters

    LG Chem says U.S. panel's interim ruling favours it in SK trade secrets case

    A U.S. trade panel ruled on an interim basis in favour of South Korean electric vehicle (EV) battery maker LG Chem which had accused crosstown rival SK Innovation of misappropriating trade secrets, LG Chem said on Sunday. LG Chem and SK Innovation have hit each other with U.S. lawsuits for thefts of trade secrets and patent infringements in a bitter row that threatens to disrupt the launches of EVs by some of the world's biggest car makers. The so-called default judgment by the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) could potentially mean SK Innovation, as sought by LG Chem, cannot import some battery products, components and materials it may need to supply its U.S. factories for Volkswagen and Ford Motors.

  • 2021 Volkswagen GTI teased in diesel GTD form
    Autoblog

    2021 Volkswagen GTI teased in diesel GTD form

    Volkswagen released a teaser image of the new GTD, the diesel version of the 2021 VW GTI, ahead of the hot hatchbacks' Geneva Motor Show reveals. In typical VW fashion, the styling changes are subtle. This trim remains chrome on the GTD, but we expect the GTI will have red trim instead.

  • Volkswagen's group deliveries in China fall 11.3% y/y
    Reuters

    Volkswagen's group deliveries in China fall 11.3% y/y

    Volkswagen, one of the world's biggest carmakers, on Friday said deliveries in China declined by 11.3% in January as the auto sector feels the effects of the coronavirus outbreak. The German company said the group, which includes brands like Volkswagen and Audi, delivered 343,400 vehicles in China and Hong Kong. The country is VW's biggest market.

  • Financial Times

    VW offers direct payouts to sidestep emissions lawsuit

    Volkswagen has attempted to circumvent Germany’s largest collective lawsuit by offering more than 400,000 customers direct compensation for vehicles that were installed with diesel emissions cheat devices ahead of a critical court date in May. The company said an €830m settlement agreement with the consumer rights group VZBV, which brought the landmark case to a court near VW’s headquarters last year, fell apart due to a dispute over an extra €50m in legal fees. Instead, it launched a website asking claimants to register directly with VW in order to receive their share of the proposed amount.

  • Benzinga

    'Dean Of Valuation' Says Tesla Still Has Long Way To Go To Justify Stock Price

    Aswath Damodaran told CNBC's Squawk Alley that Tesla would need to generate revenues like Volkswagen Group (OTC: VLKAF)does in a decade and margins like those of Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL) along with making manufacturing investments “like no other manufacturing company before" to justify its current stock price.

  • Bloomberg

    French Giant Looks at Tesla With Burning Envy

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- On one side of the Atlantic, Tesla Inc. is capitalizing on its soaring share price by selling $2 billion in stock so it can build more electric vehicles. On the other, French manufacturer Renault SA has been forced to cut its dividend by 70% and announce a big reduction in fixed costs so it can afford to do the same.Dwindling profits and Renault’s drastic remedies were mirrored this week by its Japanese alliance partner Nissan Motor Co., as well at Daimler AG. (Renault has an engineering partnership with Daimler and owns a small stake in the German car and truck maker.) Their problems aren’t identical but all three had expanded their workforces in anticipation of demand that hasn’t materialized and now they have to tighten their belts to pay for expensive electric vehicles, for which demand remains uncertain.  Renault’s shares are near their lowest level in eight years, which means the company is capitalized at barely 10 billion euros ($11 billion), a sum that includes the 43% stake Renault owns in Nissan. Needless to say, that’s a sliver of what Tesla is worth, even though the U.S. company’s annual output is still almost a rounding error for the Renault-Nissan alliance.  This juxtaposition sends a crystal clear message: Carmakers that grew fat and happy producing combustion engine vehicles won’t get any help from the stock market now that they’ve decided to embrace an electric future. Instead the gasoline gang are going to fund these changes themselves and it’s going to be painful, for both employees and shareholders.Long-established automakers have decided that their salvation is to be found in alliances and partnerships, which spread the cost of developing expensive technology over a greater number of car sales. It’s why Renault tried to merge with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV, before Peugeot-owner PSA Group beat them to it.  But in Renault’s case its links to other manufactures are amplifying its problems right now, not solving them. Relations with Nissan fell apart when former alliance boss Carlos Ghosn was arrested and remain fragile now that he’s free to settle scores. Both sides have since hired new CEOs but their shareholders aren’t yet ready to buy the story that harmony has been restored.With its own profits slumping, Nissan can’t afford to pay big dividends to Renault and the French are also earning less from the Daimler partnership. The upshot is that Renault is a bit squeezed for cash — net cash at the automotive unit dwindled to just 1.7 billion euros at the end of December (though gross liquidity, including available credit lines, was a more respectable 16 billion euros). One way Renault could free up some money would be to sell part of its Nissan stake, which might have the added benefit of helping to re-balance the alliance in Nissan’s favor, something the Japanese have long sought. The trouble is Nissan’s shares have halved in value over the last two years so selling now wouldn’t provide Renault with nearly as much as it once would. Interim CEO Clotilde Delbos all but ruled out such a move on Friday.So it’s no wonder that Renault has opted to drastically scale back its own dividend and will try to cut costs by 2 billion euros in the next three years. Delbos, who’s also the chief financial officer, didn’t go into much detail about how those savings will be delivered but the company plans to review its “industrial footprint,” which suggests plant closures are a possibility. (Alliance partner Nissan has already announced 12,500 job cuts, while Daimler is targeting at least 10,000.)Lowering costs won’t be straight forward. New Renault CEO Luca de Meo, a former Volkswagen AG executive, doesn’t start until July and French unions aren’t known for championing efforts to slash jobs. In the near term, restructuring costs will also put further pressure on Renault’s cash flow and the coronavirus could yet create unexpected problems. But unlike at Tesla, Renault doesn’t have a queue of wealthy supporters clamoring to help fund this epochal clean-vehicle transition. One way or other, employees and existing shareholders will end up paying.To contact the author of this story: Chris Bryant at cbryant32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Volkswagen offers 830 million euros to compensate German buyers
    Reuters

    Volkswagen offers 830 million euros to compensate German buyers

    Volkswagen said it will compensate owners of its heavily polluting diesel vehicles in Germany in a settlement that will cost the German carmaker 830 million euros. In 2015 VW was caught by regulators using manipulated engine management software to mask excessive pollution levels in its diesel cars, sparking a raft of prosecutions and lawsuits. The offer comes despite a breakdown in talks with German consumer association VZBV, which had been in negotiations with VW about reaching a settlement deal .

  • China's auto sales may fall 10% in H1 due to coronavirus - industry association
    Reuters

    China's auto sales may fall 10% in H1 due to coronavirus - industry association

    China's auto market, the world's largest, is likely to see sales slide more than 10% in the first half of the year due to the coronavirus epidemic, the country's top auto industry body told Reuters on Friday. "We predict auto sales will drop by more than 10% in the first half of this year, and around 5% for the whole year if the epidemic is effectively contained before April," Fu Bingfeng, executive vice chairman of the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers (CAAM), told Reuters in a written interview. Auto executives say the coronavirus, which has killed more than 1,380 people and infected nearly 64,000 in mainland China, is taking a severe toll on the industry, sapping buyer demand and disrupting supply chains for car makers globally.

  • Volkswagen to shut coal-fired power stations at main factory to cut CO2
    Reuters

    Volkswagen to shut coal-fired power stations at main factory to cut CO2

    Volkswagen is shutting down two coal-fired power stations at its main plant in Wolfsburg, Germany and has declined offers to sell them to cut down the company's carbon dioxide emissions, Chief Executive Herbert Diess said on Friday. "I have already declined offers from several interested parties who wanted to buy our old Wolfsburg coal plants and rebuild them elsewhere in the world," Diess said in a post https://bit.ly/38vkmsU on LinkedIn. Volkswagen said it is replacing the coal-fired power stations with gas turbine plants, a step which will help cut VW factory's carbon dioxide emissions by 60%, equivalent to the emissions of 870,000 cars.

  • Financial Times

    Volkswagen boss condemns German coal plant

    Volkswagen’s chief executive has taken aim at Germany’s energy companies and politicians, strongly criticising the launch of a coal-fired power plant in a sign of increasing disunity among the country’s leading industrialists on climate change. , who is overseeing VW’s transformation to a manufacturer of battery-powered vehicles, highlighted the “paradox” of the plant near Dortmund being given the go-ahead, while Berlin pledges to phase out coal by 2038. “There, €1.5bn has been invested in coal entry,” Mr Diess added, referring to utility company Uniper’s investment in the Datteln 4 site.

  • Reuters

    FOCUS-Hyundai bet big on China. Now coronavirus is twisting its supply chain

    South Korean car giant Hyundai Motor has increasingly relied on China to supply auto parts to its manufacturing hub at home in recent years. One of its main suppliers, Kyungshin, which has rapidly boosted capacity in China over the past two decades to capitalise on the country's lower labour costs and proximity to South Korea, has seen its operations hit hard by the epidemic.

  • What should the Volkswagen ID.Buzz be called when it reaches production?
    Autoblog

    What should the Volkswagen ID.Buzz be called when it reaches production?

    Volkswagen's electric car offensive will include a production version of the ID.Buzz concept unveiled at the 2017 Detroit Auto Show. Johan de Nysschen, Volkswagen of America's chief operating officer, told Motor Trend company insiders refer to the upcoming, MEB-based production model as the ID.Buzz. In a major break with tradition, the company is taking a de Nysschen-approved alphanumerical approach to naming its upcoming range of electric cars; the Golf-sized hatchback it introduced in 2019 is called ID.3, and unverified reports claim the upcoming America-bound crossover will be called ID.4.

  • Exclusive: Germany's Volkswagen and Daimler push for more 'sustainable' Chile lithium
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Germany's Volkswagen and Daimler push for more 'sustainable' Chile lithium

    German automakers Volkswagen and Daimler have launched a study to push for more "sustainable" lithium mining in Chile, according to lobbyist filings reviewed by Reuters, a sign of growing supply chain concerns ahead of an expected electric vehicle boom. Chile's Atacama salt flat is by far the biggest source of supply of the ultralight battery metal in South America's so-called "lithium triangle." The region, whose fragile ecosystem relies on a limited water supply, is home to the globe's top two producers, U.S.-based Albemarle Corp and Chile's SQM .

  • Reuters

    U.S. lawmakers to hear calls for requiring new safeguards for self-driving cars

    A U.S. House panel on Tuesday will hear calls for requiring new safeguards as part of any effort to speed the adoption of self-driving cars on U.S. roads. At the same hearing, groups representing automakers and tech companies will tout benefits of autonomous vehicles and warn the United States risks falling behind China and others without new legal backing. U.S. lawmakers have been divided for years over what consumer and legal protections should be added to any self-driving legislation.

  • Coronavirus update: 910 deaths, 40,000 sickened, companies withdraw from global conferences
    MarketWatch

    Coronavirus update: 910 deaths, 40,000 sickened, companies withdraw from global conferences

    There are now 40,484 confirmed coronavirus cases and 910 deaths, according to figures released Monday by the World Health Organization.

  • Volkswagen postpones reopening of some Chinese plants amid coronavirus spread
    MarketWatch

    Volkswagen postpones reopening of some Chinese plants amid coronavirus spread

    Volkswagen AG said Saturday that it has postponed production at some of its plants in China as the deadly coronavirus continues to spread.

  • Reuters

    CORRECTED-WRAPUP 9-American dies of coronavirus in China; five Britons infected in French Alps

    A 60-year-old American has died of the new coronavirus, the first confirmed non-Chinese death of the illness, U.S. officials said, as millions of Chinese began returning home after a Lunar New Year break that was extended to try to contain the outbreak. While the vast majority of cases have been in China, the virus has spread to some two dozen countries abroad, including five British nationals infected in a French mountain resort. The American died on Thursday in Wuhan, epicentre of the virus outbreak in the central Chinese province of Hubei, a U.S. embassy spokesman said in Beijing on Saturday.

  • Volkswagen says restart of some China plants postponed until February 17
    Reuters

    Volkswagen says restart of some China plants postponed until February 17

    Volkswagen has postponed restarting production at most China plants in its joint venture with SAIC Motor and the Tianjin plant in its JV with FAW Group until Feb. 17 amid the coronavirus epidemic. One car-manufacturing plant Volkswagen operates with SAIC in Shanghai and most of the plants in the FAW joint venture will restart on Feb. 10, the German automaker said in an emailed statement on Saturday.

  • Reuters

    U.S. ends antitrust probe of four automakers over California emissions deal- source

    The U.S. Justice Department on Friday told four automakers it had closed an antitrust investigation into a voluntary agreement the companies reached with California on emissions without taking any action, a source told Reuters. Ford Motor Co and Honda Motor Co confirmed the probe had been ended. The Trump administration in September issued a determination that California cannot set its own vehicle emission standards and had been investigating if the companies engaged in anti-competitive conduct in striking the deal.

  • Reuters

    U.S. House panel to hold hearing on future of self-driving cars

    A U.S. House panel will hold a hearing Tuesday on autonomous vehicles as lawmakers try to hammer out legislation to advance self-driving cars. An Energy and Commerce subcommittee overseeing automotive issues will hear from officials of trade groups representing automakers and tech companies, as well as safety advocates and a San Francisco transit official.

  • VW Atlas Tanoak is pretty much dead, but a smaller pickup is a possibility
    Autoblog

    VW Atlas Tanoak is pretty much dead, but a smaller pickup is a possibility

    It had rugged, truck-like looks, and according to VW's Vice President of Product Marketing and Strategy, Hein Schafer, it was extremely well-received. Unfortunately, Schafer also explained that the odds of it reaching production are slim to none. First of all, it would take a large amount of development time and money to adapt the Atlas into a pickup truck with reasonably competitive capability, and even then, he said that it probably wouldn't be as capable as traditional body-on-frame trucks.