VMBS - Vanguard Mortgage-Backed Securities Index Fund ETF Shares

NasdaqGM - NasdaqGM Real Time Price. Currency in USD
52.76
-0.04 (-0.08%)
As of 12:48PM EDT. Market open.
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Previous Close52.80
Open52.78
Bid52.75 x 3200
Ask52.76 x 900
Day's Range52.74 - 52.78
52 Week Range50.19 - 52.91
Volume5,460,120
Avg. Volume851,812
Net Assets9.74B
NAV52.77
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
Yield2.85%
YTD Return3.70%
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.73
Expense Ratio (net)0.07%
Inception Date2009-11-19
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • 3 Wonderful, But Ignored Vanguard ETFs
    InvestorPlace21 days ago

    3 Wonderful, But Ignored Vanguard ETFs

    When it comes to building a portfolio, Vanguard ETFs and funds are often the top draws for investors. And there's a good reason for that. The firm and investment pioneer John Bogle created the idea of the index fund back in the 1970s. Moreover, the asset manager's philosophy stems from low-cost investing. So, naturally, Vanguard ETFs are some of the least expensive funds to own. When putting all the pieces together, it becomes really easy to see why Vanguard ETFs have attracted billions of dollars' worth of assets from investors both big and small.The question is which Vanguard funds make sense for you?The firm has a line-up of 80 different ETFs and the bulk of those offerings can be a bit heavy. For example, the Vanguard S&P 500 ETF (NYSEArca:VOO) holds more than $106 billion in assets, while the Vanguard FTSE Emerging Markets ETF (NYSEArca:VWO) holds roughly $62 billion. As a result, just a few Vanguard ETFs get most of the press. That's a shame as the firm's low-cost and index-hugging mantra extends to the rest of its ETF line-up as well.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * The 10 Biggest Announcements From Apple WWDC 2019 With that, here are three wonderful, but commonly overlooked Vanguard ETFs that should be right at home in your portfolio. Vanguard Extended Market ETF (VXF)Source: Shutterstock Over the long haul, small- and mid-cap stocks have long outperformed their bigger counterparts. However, most investors still remain woefully underweight smaller stocks and finding successful individual winners here can be incredibly difficult. This is where Vanguard ETFs can come to the rescue.The Vanguard Extended Market ETF (NYSEARCA:VXF) allows investors to tap into both small- and mid-cap stocks at the same time with one ticker. VXF tracks the S&P Completion Index. As the name implies, the fund owns everything that isn't in the large-cap focused S&P 500. And we're talking literally everything. VXF currently holds more than 3,260 different small- and mid-cap stocks. When you combine the fund with large-cap holdings, you basically have the U.S. stock market covered. The best part is, by using this ETF, the volatility and single-company risks are minimized to almost zero. With it, investors can instantly overweight the economies real growth engines.It turns out this is a powerful thing to do.When it comes to Vanguard ETFs, VXF has been a top performer. Over the last ten years, the fund has averaged a 16.61% annual total return. That's not too shabby by any means. And as a Vanguard fund, VXF is pretty cheap to own. Expenses for the ETF clock in at just 0.07%- or just $7 per $10,000 invested.In the end, VXF does everything a Vanguard ETF should do. That's broad indexing a rock-bottom price. Vanguard Mortgage-Backed Securities ETF (VMBS)Source: Grab Media When it comes to bonds, Treasury securities are often the first stop for investors and there are plenty of Vanguard ETFs looking at these. However, there is a way to get a slightly higher yield and still keep that government guarantee. We're talking about mortgage-back securities or MBS bonds.Mortgage-backed securities are bonds secured by home and other real estate loans. There are all different flavors of these, but the vast bulk of them are residential-focused and issued by federal government agencies like Ginnie Mae (GNMA) or government sponsored-enterprises Fannie Mae (FNMA), or Freddie Mac (FHLMC). Moreover, MBS bonds typically pay slightly more than comparable Treasury bonds thanks to the higher risk that you or I could default on our mortgages or pay them back earlier. However, GNMA bonds are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, while the recession taught us that the government will bail out Freddie and Fannie when the water's get rough.With that, the Vanguard Mortgage-Backed Securities ETF (NYSEARCA:VMBS) could be a good bet for investors looking for a bit more. VMBS tracks Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Mortgage-Backed Securities Float Adjusted Index -- which only focuses on U.S. agency mortgage bonds. None of the funny stuff. As a result, the ETF has been pretty steadfast since inception and yields a healthy 3.02%. * The 10 Best Stocks for 2019 -- So Far By using the Vanguard ETF, investors can get access to an esoteric asset class for a cheap 0.07% in expenses. Vanguard International Dividend Appreciation ETF (VIGI)Source: Shutterstock With $34 billion in assets, the Vanguard Dividend Appreciation ETF (NYSEARCA:VIG) is a star player among Vanguard ETFs. VIG follows those stocks that have long histories of increasing their dividends every year. This strategy provides a way for investors to grow their income potential and provides with great long-term returns.But it's not U.S. stocks that benefit from growing dividends, international ones also win here.Which is why the smaller and often ignored Vanguard International Dividend Appreciation ETF (NYSEARCA:VIGI) can be a great compliment to the more popular VIG.VIGI also tracks a basket of large-cap stocks that have increased their dividends consistently over the last seven years. This time, the ETF combs both non-U.S. developed and emerging markets to find its dividend champions -- currently at a 75%/25% spilt between developed and emerging market stocks. The top 400 stocks are included in the index.This provides a way for investors to not only score some much-needed international exposure but also income growth as well. Currently, VIGI yields about 1.89%. However, that yield could be worth even more over the long haul. As foreign currencies fluctuate against the U.S. dollar, a drop in the dollar would boost the Vanguard ETFs underlying yield, as weaker local currencies convert into the stronger dollar.All in all, VIGI should belong in your portfolio just as much as VIG. Expenses run a cheap 0.25%.Disclosure: At the time of writing, Aaron Levitt did not hold a position in any of the ETFs mentioned. More From InvestorPlace * 4 Top American Penny Pot Stocks (Buy Before June 21) * 6 Retailers Including Disney Agree to Ditch On-Call Scheduling * The 10 Best Stocks for 2019 -- So Far * 7 Small-Cap ETFs to Buy Now Compare Brokers The post 3 Wonderful, But Ignored Vanguard ETFs appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • ETF Trends4 months ago

    Investors Pile Into This Mortgage Backed Securities ETF

    Amid a more sanguine outlook for U.S. interest rates this year, which is helping steady mortgage applications, investors are seeking lower risk, yield-driven strategies, including exchange traded funds ...

  • ETF Trends5 months ago

    Mortgage Applications Retreat as Rates Creep Higher

    The number of mortgage applications last week fell 2.7 percent compared to the previous week, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association's seasonally adjusted index. "Reversing the recent downward trend, borrowers saw increasing rates for most loan types last week, as better-than-expected unemployment claims, easing trade tensions and stabilization in the equity markets ultimately led to a rise in Treasury rates," said Joel Kan, an MBA economist. "Oftentimes, a big loss in equities markets can send money running to the bond market where it benefits interest rates," said Matthew Graham, chief operating officer at Mortgage News Daily.

  • Investopedia7 months ago

    Why Equity ETFs May Be Worth Considering Now

    In recent weeks, the S&P 500 has been on a rollercoaster ride, plunging dramatically in early October only to make partial recoveries heading into November. Understandably, investors may be skittish about the prospect of equities at this point in time, with some calling for the largest recession in years.

  • ETF Trends10 months ago

    Mulling Mortgage-Backed Securities ETFs

    With the Federal Reserve continuing its efforts to normalize U.S. monetary policy, plenty of asset classes could be affected by those plans, including mortgage-backed securities (MBS) and exchange traded ...