WFC-PY - Wells Fargo & Company

NYSE - Nasdaq Real Time Price. Currency in USD
26.34
-0.05 (-0.19%)
As of 1:04PM EST. Market open.
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Previous Close26.39
Open26.43
Bid26.33 x 2900
Ask26.34 x 4000
Day's Range26.33 - 26.43
52 Week Range22.76 - 27.15
Volume18,760
Avg. Volume91,344
Market Cap215.076B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.10
PE Ratio (TTM)5.67
EPS (TTM)4.65
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield1.41 (5.32%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-08-29
1y Target EstN/A
  • Norwest Venture's growth chief seeks different opportunities with new $1B fund
    American City Business Journals

    Norwest Venture's growth chief seeks different opportunities with new $1B fund

    Jon Kossow, who heads Norwest Venture partrners' private equity/growth unit talks to the Business Journal about the firm's new $1 b illion fund and what his group is focused on.

  • Warren Buffett Likes These Stocks Even Better Than Apple
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    Warren Buffett Likes These Stocks Even Better Than Apple

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  • EnLink's 20% Yield Is Everything Wrong With America's Pipelines
    Bloomberg

    EnLink's 20% Yield Is Everything Wrong With America's Pipelines

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- When a stock goes into free fall, one hope is that some acquirer out there will catch it. Sometimes, though, suitors come with their own complications. That brings us to EnLink Midstream LLC.EnLink operates gathering and processing pipelines and other oil and gas infrastructure across several onshore U.S. basins. In the summer of 2018, Devon Energy Corp., an exploration and production company, sold its stakes in various EnLink entities to Global Infrastructure Partners for just over $3.1 billion. After a subsequent simplification of EnLink, GIP owns 46% of the common units, now worth $1.2 billion.EnLink has been undone by weaker commodity prices. Earlier this month, Devon announced it had dropped the number of rigs operating in one of Oklahoma’s shale basins to precisely zero (how’s that for a coda to last year’s deal?). This confirmed a trend evident already in permitting and drilling data for the Anadarko basin, where just four companies account for the majority of activity; and, crucially, they have operations in other basins that are more competitive in terms of breakeven costs.The distribution yield on EnLink’s stock now scrapes 20% — on a par with the current yield on long-dated bonds of Chesapeake Energy Corp., which just issued a going-concern notice. There’s being paid to wait, as they say, and then there’s being paid to wait in that trash compactor from Star Wars.EnLink’s cash flow math is tight. Consensus forecasts — which have now had time to digest cost savings pledged on the latest earnings call — put Ebitda at $1.1 billion in 2020. Take off around $500-$550 million for cash interest and (much-reduced) capital expenditure, and that leaves about $550-$600 million versus current distributions of about $550 million. With Ebitda forecast to grow at just 1% a year through 2022, that tight squeeze won’t ease up. Wells Fargo & Co.’s analysts estimated in a recent report that, absent a change in distribution policy, current leverage of 4.2 times adjusted Ebitda could reach almost 6 times by 2025. By any rational measure, the distribution should be cut.The complicating issue is that EnLink’s leverage is compounded by more leverage at the GIP level in the form of a $1 billion term loan. Technically, it is separate from EnLink’s own finances. But as the company acknowledges in its own 10K filing, debt owed by an entity owning almost half the company plus its managing partner, and which is serviced by EnLink’s own distributions, is very much a risk factor. By my calculations, the loan requires roughly $80 million a year of EnLink distributions (GIP didn’t respond to requests for comment)(1). As of now, distributions amount to about $255 million. So, in theory, EnLink could slash its payout by about two-thirds and GIP could still service the loan.In practice, that would be a bitter pill to swallow. As it is, GIP’s common units in EnLink are now worth not much more than the value of the loan and way below the original investment. Cutting distributions would certainly help EnLink’s balance sheet; all else equal, a 67% cut would save enough cash to take leverage below 4 times adjusted Ebitda, in line with long-term targets. But this would almost certainly push the value of GIP’s stake even lower, at least in the near term. As Ethan Bellamy, analyst at Robert W. Baird & Co. Inc., put it to me:Does GIP leverage prevent EnLink from cutting the distribution and right sizing the ship? It wouldn’t be the first time we’ve seen parental leverage from a private equity sponsor lead to sub-optimal outcomes for the subsidiary public entity.On the other hand, if EnLink cuts and its price falls further, then GIP might be tempted to make an offer for the rest of the company in an effort to salvage things out of the public eye. Needless to say, a takeover premium on an even lower EnLink price would do very little to make up for the losses suffered to date. We are seeing this play out with Blackstone Group Inc.’s offer for another midstream company, Tallgrass Energy LP, although the pain there is compounded by an agreement between the buyer and Tallgrass’s executives that effectively shields the latter from losses (see this).EnLink captures so much of what has gone wrong in America’s pipelines business. There’s the misalignment of interest between ordinary investors and the sponsors steering the company’s destiny. There’s the exposure to commodity markets from which, in theory, midstream companies were supposed to be insulated. Above all, there’s the overcapitalization of this sector, with obligations piled onto assets (largely to fund outsize payouts to controlling sponsors) that ultimately couldn’t generate the profits to service them (largely because too much stuff got built).Almost exactly four years ago, Kinder Morgan Inc. presaged the midstream reckoning to come by slashing its dividend. The stock has been listless for much of the period since then; even with the cut, chipping away at debts in a post-boom environment is a laborious process. As this decade of nominal success for America’s shale boom draws to a close, EnLink’s predicament shows the hangover remains very much a work in progress.(1) This assumes the full $1 billion remains outstanding. Interest is charged at Libor plus 4.25%, equating to 6.15%, or about $62 million. A debt-service covenant ratio of 1.1 times takes this to $68 million. Mandatory annual amortization of 1% of the loan plus assumed G&A costs results in an estimated minimum requirement of about $80 million to service the debt. Details derived from Moody's Corp.'s initial rating report from July 2018.To contact the author of this story: Liam Denning at ldenning1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Gongloff at mgongloff1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Liam Denning is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering energy, mining and commodities. He previously was editor of the Wall Street Journal's Heard on the Street column and wrote for the Financial Times' Lex column. He was also an investment banker.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Warren Buffett trims Wells Fargo stake, adds RH
    Yahoo Finance

    Warren Buffett trims Wells Fargo stake, adds RH

    The Oracle of Omaha's latest stock moves are out.

  • Wells Fargo general counsel to leave the bank early next year
    American City Business Journals

    Wells Fargo general counsel to leave the bank early next year

    Wells Fargo & Co.'s general counsel Allen Parker is leaving to pursue other career opportunities, the bank said in a press release on Thursday.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Wells Fargo former interim CEO Allen Parker to step down as general counsel

    Wells Fargo & Co on Thursday said its general counsel Allen Parker, who was formerly interim chief executive officer, would step down in March 2020. Parker joined Wells as general counsel in March 2017, served as interim CEO and president from March 2019 to October 2019, and then returned to the general counsel role. In September, the Wall Street bank named Charles Scharf as its next leader, after a wide-ranging sales practices scandal claimed two CEOs.

  • Wells Fargo former interim CEO Parker steps down as general counsel
    Reuters

    Wells Fargo former interim CEO Parker steps down as general counsel

    The departure, effective March 2020, comes at a time when Charles Scharf is beginning to put his own mark on the bank’s leadership team. Last week, the fourth-largest U.S. bank hired former JP Morgan Chase executive and previous White House official, William Daley, to head public affairs. The appointment of Daley, a former Bank of New York Mellon executive, was an early sign that Scharf might bring in more of his long-time lieutenants.

  • Vendors squeezed in Wells Fargo cost cutting push
    Reuters

    Vendors squeezed in Wells Fargo cost cutting push

    Wells Fargo spokesman Peter Gilchrist said participation in the voluntary rebate would not be considered when awarding future contacts. The bank is expected to issue a new request for business proposals from its IT vendors in the first quarter of next year. Chief Financial Officer John Shrewsberry recently pointed to professional services, or work by consultants, as a expense line that analysts and investors can expect to be reduced in the next quarter.

  • Fed May Defy History With Rates Steady Through 2020 Election
    Bloomberg

    Fed May Defy History With Rates Steady Through 2020 Election

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell is likely to signal again this week that monetary policy is on hold, buttressing the belief that he may steer clear of action through 2020.Surprisingly, that would be an historic anomaly for a U.S. presidential election year. Rather than keeping its head down, the Fed has changed policy in one direction or another in each of the last 10 presidential polling years -- though in 2016 it didn’t act to raise interest rates until after the November election.In 2012 the Fed didn’t move its benchmark rate, which was already at zero, but did announce its third round of large-scale asset purchases in September.“If you look back in history and see what the Fed did in election years, the Fed did everything they had to do,’’ said Roberto Perli, a partner at Cornerstone Macro in Washington. The best way for them to preserve their independence and credibility “is to do what they think is right.’’That hasn’t always shielded them from criticism. President George H.W. Bush famously blamed then-Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan for costing him re-election in 1992 by failing to cut interest rates more aggressively. But it’s particularly vital now for the Fed to make the case that its policies are warranted by the economic outlook because of the relentless public assault on the institution by President Donald Trump.Click here for the World Interest Rate Probability toolBreaking with more than a quarter century of precedent, Trump has repeatedly lambasted the Fed and accused it of keeping credit too tight.“We are actively competing with nations who openly cut interest rates so that now many are actually getting paid when they pay off their loan, known as negative interest,” Trump told the Economic Club of New York Tuesday.“Give me some of that money. I want some of that money. Our Federal Reserve doesn’t let us do it,” Trump said, drawing a laugh from the audience. “It puts us at a competitive disadvantage to other countries.”Powell will have a chance to make his case twice this week, on Wednesday before the Joint Economic Committee of Congress and on Thursday to the House Budget Committee. He’s likely to echo the message he delivered after the latest Fed rate cut on Oct. 30: The economy and monetary policy are in good place in the 11th year of America’s longest expansion.Investors seem to agree. Stock and bond prices have risen in recent days on signs that the U.S. economy is weathering a slowdown abroad and on hopes of a phase-one deal in the U.S.-China trade war.“Things feel a lot less threatening than they did two months ago,’’ said Carl Tannenbaum, chief economist with Northern Trust Corp. in Chicago. “The data for the U.S. has suggested that we’re not on the edge of falling off a cliff.”Front and center in that regard was the October employment report, which showed payrolls rising by 128,000 despite the loss of 41,600 jobs due to the since-ended General Motors Co. strike.Solid PayrollsThe solid jobs report allayed fears that companies spooked by the worldwide slowdown would chop payrolls just as they have done to capital outlays.It also bolstered the Fed’s hopes that the consumer will continue to have the staying power to keep the expansion on track in the face of cutbacks by businesses.Coupled with the policy message coming from Powell, the improved economic data prompted such Fed watchers as Michael Feroli of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Matthew Luzzetti of Deutsche Bank Securities to rescind their forecasts of further rate cuts.‘Material Reassessment’Powell told reporters on Oct. 30 that it would take a “material reassessment’’ of the economic outlook for the Fed to change its current 1.5% to 1.75% interest rate target range.In their September forecasts, policy makers saw the economy growing by 2% in 2020, inflation rising to near their 2% target and unemployment ending the year at 3.7%, according to their median projection. They’ll update predictions at their Dec. 10-11 meeting.Speaking to Bloomberg Television on Nov. 1, Fed Vice Chairman Richard Clarida said if the central bank saw “accumulating evidence” that it was missing on its mandate for maximum employment or stable prices, or the growth needed to sustain both goals, “we would have to factor that in.”Never BetterWhile saying that he still saw downside risks to the outlook, Clarida also highlighted the financial strength of U.S. households. “In the aggregate, the U.S. consumer’s never been in better shape,” he said.Deutsche’s Luzzetti said it would take a real crack in the labor market and the consumer for the Fed to resume reducing rates. He expects policy to remain on hold next year even though he sees slowing growth pushing unemployment to 3.9%. It was 3.6% in October.The bar to a rate hike seems even higher. Powell said that any decision to raise rates would be tied to the behavior of inflation, which remains stuck below the Fed’s 2% target.“We would need to see a really significant move up in inflation that’s persistent before we would consider raising rates to address inflation concerns,’’ Powell said.In describing the Fed’s current strategy, Powell has referred to the mid-cycle policy adjustment in 1995 and 1996, when Greenspan lowered rates three times after raising them previously.The final cut back then came in January 1996, the start of a presidential election year. The central bank then kept rates unchanged for the rest of 1996.“The Fed is probably on hold for a very long period of time,’’ Northern Trust’s Tannenbaum said.(Adds Trump comments in seventh and eighth paragraphs.)To contact the reporters on this story: Christopher Condon in Washington at ccondon4@bloomberg.net;Rich Miller in Washington at rmiller28@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Margaret Collins at mcollins45@bloomberg.net, Alister Bull, Scott LanmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Benzinga

    A Bank ETF For Dividend Hunters

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  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-U.S. CFTC orders Wells Fargo to pay $14 mln over unfair foreign exchange trade

    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission ordered Wells Fargo & Co to pay more than $14 million to settle charges it provided "misinformation" when conducting a large foreign exchange trade with a counterparty, the agency said in a statement on Friday. The CFTC said it ordered Wells Fargo Bank NA to pay a civil monetary penalty of $10 million and restitution of $4.475 million, and required the bank to cease and desist violating the CFTC's business conduct standards. Specifically, the CFTC said that Wells Fargo failed to properly price a $4 billion foreign exchange forward contract with an unnamed counterparty from 2014.

  • U.S. CFTC orders Wells Fargo to pay $14 million over unfair foreign exchange trade
    Reuters

    U.S. CFTC orders Wells Fargo to pay $14 million over unfair foreign exchange trade

    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission ordered Wells Fargo & Co to pay more than $14 million to settle charges it provided "misinformation" when conducting a large foreign exchange trade with a counterparty, the agency said in a statement on Friday. The CFTC said it ordered Wells Fargo Bank NA to pay a civil monetary penalty of $10 million and restitution of $4.475 million, and required the bank to cease and desist violating the CFTC's business conduct standards. In a statement, Wells Fargo said it cooperated with the CFTC and was pleased to have resolved the matter.

  • Man on a mission: How he's guiding a program for veterans at Wells Fargo
    American City Business Journals

    Man on a mission: How he's guiding a program for veterans at Wells Fargo

    Navy veteran Andrew Barnes leads one of the many Wells Fargo programs that focus on hiring and training of U.S. military veterans.

  • Wells Fargo taps Bill Daley, former White House official, head of public affairs
    Reuters

    Wells Fargo taps Bill Daley, former White House official, head of public affairs

    Daley, who was named vice chairman of public affairs, will report directly to Scharf and joins the fourth-largest U.S bank from Bank of New York Mellon, where Scharf was chief executive officer prior to his latest assignment.

  • Financial Times

    Wells Fargo names ex-Obama chief of staff as public affairs boss

    Wells Fargo has appointed former Obama chief of staff Bill Daley to leads its dealings with politicians and the public, as the embattled bank battles to recover from a mis- selling scandal. The bank, which has been led by new chief executive Charlie Scharf since October 21, said Mr Daley would take over as vice-chairman of Public Affairs on Nov 13.

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    To fight fraud, companies like Best Buy, Wells Fargo 'fingerprint' web browsers

    Hundreds of well-known websites are using a technology, called fingerprinting, that can identify and track even visitors taking steps to keep their privacy.

  • Wells Fargo responds to suit by banker fired after $4B Burger King deal
    American City Business Journals

    Wells Fargo responds to suit by banker fired after $4B Burger King deal

    Wells Fargo & Co. denies all of the allegations and disputes accusations of libel and slander, stating that everything the bank said about the former banker was true and “made in due course of a judicial proceeding.”

  • Investing.com

    StockBeat: Marvell Soars on Wells Fargo Upgrade

    Investing.com – Marvell Technology surged on Monday as Wells Fargo (NYSE:WFC) upgraded its outlook on the chipmaker, betting that the revival in data center spending and the rollout of 5G-enabled phones would boost chip sales.

  • American City Business Journals

    This top corporate donor dedicated much of its efforts toward lifting neighborhoods — including Orlando's Parramore community

    Central Florida's third-largest bank embraces its responsibility to help create more resilient and sustainable communities.

  • Why You Might Be Interested In Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE:WFC) For Its Upcoming Dividend
    Simply Wall St.

    Why You Might Be Interested In Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE:WFC) For Its Upcoming Dividend

    Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE:WFC) stock is about to trade ex-dividend in 4 days time. This means that investors who...

  • What To Know Before Buying Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE:WFC) For Its Dividend
    Simply Wall St.

    What To Know Before Buying Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE:WFC) For Its Dividend

    Dividend paying stocks like Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE:WFC) tend to be popular with investors, and for good reason...