WMT - Walmart Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
120.29
+0.53 (+0.44%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous Close119.76
Open119.16
Bid120.10 x 800
Ask120.35 x 800
Day's Range119.02 - 120.65
52 Week Range85.78 - 125.38
Volume4301934
Avg. Volume4,976,709
Market Cap341B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.38
PE Ratio (TTM)24.06
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield2.12 (1.77%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-12-05
1y Target EstN/A
  • Bonobos founder Andy Dunn to leave Walmart in 2020
    TechCrunch

    Bonobos founder Andy Dunn to leave Walmart in 2020

    Andy Dunn, the founder of menswear site Bonobos which sold to Walmart in 2017 for $310 million, is now parting ways with the retail giant. In it, Dunn praises the time he spent with the company and the knowledge he gained while working there. Specifically, he references several of Walmart's bigger initiatives, including its transformation into an omnichannel retail company serving customers online and offline, without distinction.

  • Can FedEx (FDX) Stock Turn Things Around with Upcoming Q2 Earnings?
    Zacks

    Can FedEx (FDX) Stock Turn Things Around with Upcoming Q2 Earnings?

    FedEx will report its second quarter fiscal 2020 performance after the market closes on Tuesday, December 17.

  • Barrons.com

    There’s a Trade Deal With China. Here’s Why the Stock Market Isn’t Thrilled.

    The U.S. and China say they have a “phase one” trade agreement, a positive for the global economy. But details were scarce and the deal hasn’t been signed, which means trade issues could continue to rattle markets.

  • Amazon Roundup: Government, re:Invent Conference, India, Other
    Zacks

    Amazon Roundup: Government, re:Invent Conference, India, Other

    Amazon had a big week with government issues, a host of new deals and announcements at its annual conference and developments in India.

  • IMKTA or WMT: Which Is the Better Value Stock Right Now?
    Zacks

    IMKTA or WMT: Which Is the Better Value Stock Right Now?

    IMKTA vs. WMT: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

  • Amazon Boosts Presence in Brazil With E-commerce Intiatives
    Zacks

    Amazon Boosts Presence in Brazil With E-commerce Intiatives

    Amazon (AMZN) gears up to open its second distribution center in Brazil in a bid to speed up deliveries.

  • Costco's (COST) Earnings Beat Estimates in Q1, Increase Y/Y
    Zacks

    Costco's (COST) Earnings Beat Estimates in Q1, Increase Y/Y

    Costco's (COST) comparable sales are hurt by one-half percent, owing to Thanksgiving happening a week later this year compared with the prior year.

  • Bruce Berkowitz's 3rd-Quarter Update
    GuruFocus.com

    Bruce Berkowitz's 3rd-Quarter Update

    Guru's Fairholme Capital Management invests in Kraft Heinz Continue reading...

  • AMZN Stock: What to Know About Amazon Heading into 2020
    Zacks

    AMZN Stock: What to Know About Amazon Heading into 2020

    Shares of Amazon (AMZN) have slipped 6% in the past six months, while the S&P 500 climbed 9%. So when will Wall Street and investors start to think about buying Amazon stock again?

  • GuruFocus.com

    Is Tesla Apple? Is Elon Musk Steve Jobs?

    Can Tesla become as successful as Apple, and can Tesla cars turn into an iPhone-like franchise? Continue reading...

  • Reuters

    Bonobos founder Andy Dunn to leave Walmart

    Bonobos founder Andy Dunn said on Thursday he would leave Walmart Inc early 2020, more than two years after the world's largest retailer bought his online menswear brand. The departure was announced via a LinkedIn post titled "A Love Letter to Walmart." He did not provide details on his future plans or his last day at the company. Dunn, currently the senior vice-president of digital consumer brands at Walmart U.S. eCommerce, became part of the company's efforts to take on Amazon.com Inc and other online sellers when the big-box retailer acquired Bonobos for $310 million in June 2017.

  • Disney is giving us Baby Yoda toys for Christmas
    MarketWatch

    Disney is giving us Baby Yoda toys for Christmas

    You can now preorder plush and collectible toys of the breakout star of “The Mandalorian” on Disney+ from Amazon, Walmart and Disney.com

  • Home Depot (HD) Stock Takes a Hit on Soft Fiscal 2020 View
    Zacks

    Home Depot (HD) Stock Takes a Hit on Soft Fiscal 2020 View

    Home Depot (HD) provides an update on One Home Depot Plan and outlines view for fiscal 2020.

  • Walmart takes a page from Kroger playbook with driverless vehicles
    American City Business Journals

    Walmart takes a page from Kroger playbook with driverless vehicles

    Discount retailer Walmart is taking a page from supermarket giant Kroger Co. by testing driverless delivery using Nuro vehicles.

  • Amazon Prime members can place orders on Dec. 24 and get items by Christmas Day
    MarketWatch

    Amazon Prime members can place orders on Dec. 24 and get items by Christmas Day

    Amazon Prime members still have nearly two weeks to have purchases delivered while non-Prime shoppers only have a few more days for free delivery.

  • ‘Post-Chemical World’ Takes Shape as Agribusiness Goes Green
    Bloomberg

    ‘Post-Chemical World’ Takes Shape as Agribusiness Goes Green

    (Bloomberg) -- Agribusiness is increasingly turning to natural and sustainable alternatives to chemicals as consumers rebuff genetically modified foods and concerns grow over Big Ag’s role in climate change.At the heart of the trend are innovations that harness beneficial microorganisms in the soil, including seed-coatings of naturally occurring bacteria and fungi that can do the same work as traditional chemicals, from warding off pests to helping plants flourish, according to a global patent study by research firm GreyB Services.“Both entrepreneurs and investors are saying, ‘Hey, the writing is on the wall, we’re entering a post-chemical world,’” said Rob LeClerc, chief executive officer of AgFunder, an online venture-capital platform. “The seed companies who have billions in market cap are like ‘We need to do something,’ and everyone recognizes the opportunity.”Much of the handwringing over farm chemicals stems from the recent fate of glyphosate, the most ubiquitous weedkiller ever. Regulators around the world are tightening up rules around using the chemical, including Europe and Mexico. Meanwhile, thousands of lawsuits that could result in billions of dollars in penalties are pending against Bayer AG over whether its glyphosate-containing product, Roundup, caused cancer. Bayer insists it’s safe, and some government agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency say it isn’t likely to cause cancer in humans.The global fertilizer and pesticide market is around $240 billion, and grows 2% to 3% a year, according to Ben Belldegrun, a managing partner at Pontifax AgTech, a company that invests in food and agriculture technology. While so-called biologicals including biofertilizers, biopesticides and biostimulants are just 2% of that market, those have been growing closer to 15% a year for the past five years, Belldegrun said.Pressure for less chemical-intensive farming methods is coming from retailers like Walmart Inc., non-governmental organizations and consumers, who are throwing more dollars toward organic and other niche foods with environmental or animal welfare claims.As population increases worldwide, the demand for agricultural products is projected to grow 15% over the next decade with no change in the amount of land available for farming, according to a joint report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization.“There’s a growing world population and how are we going to feed all of these people?” asked Craig Forney, assistant director for licensing and business development at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. “At the same time, we want to protect the environment. We need to use land better and use the resources better.”The answer, Forney said, is “intensified agricultural production to increase productivity of land and do it with minimal chemical support.”Patents give owners the exclusive right to an invention, and can indicate both where research funding is being spent and where companies or universities expect to generate revenue in the future.Companies like BASF SE, Bayer and Syngenta AG have patents on products using naturally-occurring microbes to help crops flourish even when there is low water availability, according to GreyB’s analysis. The microbes can act as catalysts to encourage growth. Biological-based fungicides and insecticides can also help reduce crop damage from insects, slugs and fungi.“Seed-applied biological products can extend the window of disease and pest protection, while some also provide alternate modes of action that can reduce the build-up of resistance, aid with nutrient management and reduce plant stress,” said Chris Judd, BASF’s global strategic marketing manager for Seed Treatment, Inoculants and Biologicals.Evonik Industries AG, Altair Nanotechnologies Inc., Covestro AG and startup Indigo AG have been active in obtaining patents and publishing research in the area of using microbes, as have universities like China’s Zhejiang University and Nanjing Agricultural University, according to GreyB.Likewise, thousands of patents are being issued to companies like BASF, Bayer and Dow Inc. for more natural ways of managing pests including pheromones that deter breeding and reflective mulches, instead of chemical-based insecticides.Germany’s Bayer, which bought agriculture chemical giant Monsanto Co. in 2018, sees “high growth potential” for biologicals, citing a challenging regulatory environment for chemicals and a growing emphasis on sustainability in agriculture. Bayer has a research and development team solely focused on them. The company also is hunting for partnerships to boost its portfolio. Benoit Hartmann, head of biologics at Bayer, said the increased investments show how the science around microbes has matured in recent years.In 2013, BASF acquired seed-treatment supplier Becker Underwood, which helped the company become a leader in biological agents to fight bacteria and fungi. Judd said the company sees demand for biologicals increasing but maintains that they need “to be compatible with an increasing array of chemistries and to have the ability to survive on the seed for adequate periods.”The increased patenting reflects a trend of researchers looking for ways to help promote organic and non-GMO farming, said Nicole Kling, a patent agent with Nixon Peabody who specializes in the biotechnology field.With biologicals, “You’re not introducing chemicals with the scare quotes around it,” Kling said. “You’re not doing anything that would harm the agricultural workers.”Researchers and companies are looking for new solutions for farming with less chemicals because organic farming, the most popular alternative to modern conventional farming, often results in lower yields. Still, demand for food continues increasing. Iowa State and other universities around the world, using government funding or in partnership with companies, are rushing to deal with those competing demands.“The hope is someday in the future they will merge and you will have organic and non-GMO products that are just as productive as Big Ag,” Forney said.That’s where things like precision agriculture to tailor the application of nutrients, artificial intelligence to monitor soil conditions and the development of new plant hybrids come in.Other emerging techniques that could boost yields while helping farmers use less chemicals is artificial intelligence, which is being used to analyze which seeds and crops can yield the most based on changing soil conditions and weather patterns on a farm. The promise of quantum computers would let companies use massive computing power to develop and analyze new seeds and fertilizers.Scientists also are developing new plant varieties, with applications for new varieties up 9% in 2018, according to the World Intellectual Property Organization. China led the growth, with more than a quarter of the applications for new varieties.Much of the research in crop biotech is centered in the U.S., China, Germany, Japan and South Korea, though it’s being adapted to meet local conditions in Africa, Latin America and Asia, according to WIPO, an agency of the U.N.Demand for more food will be greatest in Africa, India and the Middle East. In the developing world, there is little food scarcity because “we did good things with all that ‘better living through chemistry,’” Kling said, referring to a play on an old DuPont motto. It has come at a cost, though.“We’re starting to see some of the effects of that -- all of this wonderful industrialization has contributed to climate change,” Kling said. “We’re starting to see people swing back in the other direction.”(Adds executive comment in fifteenth paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Lydia Mulvany in Chicago at lmulvany2@bloomberg.net;Susan Decker in Washington at sdecker1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, ;James Attwood at jattwood3@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth WassermanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Walmart (WMT) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?
    Zacks

    Is Walmart (WMT) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

    Is (WMT) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

  • GuruFocus.com

    A Look at Berkshire's McLane Distribution Business

    McLane has some of the thinnest profit margins and highest profits in the Berkshire group Continue reading...

  • Home Depot’s investments may weigh on near-term results but analysts see the long-term benefit
    MarketWatch

    Home Depot’s investments may weigh on near-term results but analysts see the long-term benefit

    Home Depot’s investments in stores and online set up the retailer for long-term gains, analysts say.

  • Financial Times

    Bonobos co-founder leaves as Walmart shakes up ecommerce

    The co-founder of Bonobos is leaving Walmart little more than two years after he agreed to sell the online men’s clothing store to the US retailer and took charge of its burgeoning collection of digitally focused brands. Andy Dunn’s departure comes as Walmart shakes up its lossmaking ecommerce operations as the world’s largest bricks-and-mortar retailer grapples for supremacy with Amazon. The 40-year-old started Bonobos in 2007 and became a senior member of Walmart’s ecommerce team ten years later after the retailer struck a deal to buy it for $310m in cash.

  • FedEx Q2 2020 Earnings Preview: Time to Buy Beaten Down FDX Stock?
    Zacks

    FedEx Q2 2020 Earnings Preview: Time to Buy Beaten Down FDX Stock?

    Should investors think about buying beaten down FedEx stock before it releases its second quarter fiscal 2020 earnings results on Tuesday, December 17?

  • Buy Amazon (AMZN) Stock on the Dip Before a 2020 Rally?
    Zacks

    Buy Amazon (AMZN) Stock on the Dip Before a 2020 Rally?

    Is now the time to buy Amazon stock on the dip heading into 2020 with AMZN stock down 6% in the last six months?

  • Target CEO thinks this new food brand will be its biggest brand ever
    Yahoo Finance

    Target CEO thinks this new food brand will be its biggest brand ever

    Target is all in on this new private label food brand.

  • GuruFocus.com

    Walmart Looks to Deliver Groceries Using Nuro's Vehicle

    The big-box retailer is rolling out a pilot program using Nuro’s vehicle to deliver groceries Continue reading...