WORK - Slack Technologies, Inc.

NYSE - Nasdaq Real Time Price. Currency in USD
24.66
+0.03 (+0.14%)
As of 3:38PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close24.62
Open24.59
Bid24.71 x 900
Ask24.72 x 900
Day's Range24.26 - 24.98
52 Week Range21.25 - 42.00
Volume5,415,790
Avg. Volume7,417,964
Market Cap13.415B
Beta (3Y Monthly)N/A
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-2.56
Earnings DateSep 4, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est34.50
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Why Saudi Aramco’s ‘aspirational’ $2 trillion listing is leaving investors cold
    Yahoo Finance

    Why Saudi Aramco’s ‘aspirational’ $2 trillion listing is leaving investors cold

    Saudi Aramo is forging ahead with IPO plans that may value the company at $2 trillion, as investors weigh the risks associated with the offering.

  • GlobeNewswire

    ROSEN, A GLOBALLY RECOGNIZED LAW FIRM, Reminds Slack Technologies, Inc. Investors of Important Deadline in Securities Class Action; Encourages Investors with Losses in Excess of $100K to Contact the Firm – WORK

    NEW YORK, Oct. 14, 2019 -- Rosen Law Firm, a global investor rights law firm, reminds purchasers of the securities of Slack Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: WORK) pursuant or.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Kessler Topaz Meltzer & Check, Llp Announces a Securities Fraud Class Action Filed Against Slack Technologies, Inc.

    The law firm of Kessler Topaz Meltzer & Check, LLP announces that a securities fraud class action lawsuit has been filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California against Slack Technologies, Inc. (NYSE:  WORK) (“Slack”) on behalf of those who purchased or otherwise acquired Slack’s Class A common stock pursuant and/or traceable to Slack’s registration statement and prospectus (collectively, the “Registration Statement”) for the resale of up to 118,429,640 shares of its Class A common stock whereby Slack began trading as a public company on or around June 20, 2019. Important Deadline:  Investors who purchased or otherwise acquired Slack securities pursuant to the Registration Statement may, no later than November 18, 2019, seek to be appointed as a lead plaintiff representative of the class.

  • SLACK SHAREHOLDER ALERT: Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP Encourages Investors Who Suffered Losses Exceeding $100,000 In Slack Technologies, Inc. To Contact The Firm
    Newsfile

    SLACK SHAREHOLDER ALERT: Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP Encourages Investors Who Suffered Losses Exceeding $100,000 In Slack Technologies, Inc. To Contact The Firm

    New York, New York--(Newsfile Corp. - October 11, 2019) - Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP, a leading national securities law firm, reminds investors in Slack Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: WORK) ("Slack" or the "Company")  of the November 18, 2019 deadline to seek the role of lead plaintiff in a federal securities class action that has been filed against the Company. Faruqi & Faruqi logoCannot view this image? Visit:https://orders.newsfilecorp.com/files/6455/48688_26076fd9f48f296a_logo_lg.jpgIf you invested in Slack stock or ...

  • Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On Slack Technologies Inc (WORK)
    Insider Monkey

    Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On Slack Technologies Inc (WORK)

    Many investors, including Paul Tudor Jones or Stan Druckenmiller, have been saying before the Q4 market crash that the stock market is overvalued due to a low interest rate environment that leads to companies swapping their equity for debt and focusing mostly on short-term performance such as beating the quarterly earnings estimates. In the first […]

  • Would Facebook Stock Benefit From a Workplace Spinoff?
    InvestorPlace

    Would Facebook Stock Benefit From a Workplace Spinoff?

    I happened to read an article from August that discussed the fact that Zoom Video's (NASDAQ:ZOOM) stock fell because Facebook's (NASDAQ:FB) Workplace business communications platform had introduced video tools.Source: fyv6561 / Shutterstock.com InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsFacebook is a giant company, so I'm not sure how many owners of FB stock actually noticed. However, the news made me think about the efforts to break up Big Tech and what that might mean for FB stock. I actually wrote about this very subject in March, suggesting that Elizabeth Warren is right to want to break up the big tech stocks. "Innovation only thrives when small businesses can grow into big companies. Warren believes this isn't happening as a result of big tech stocks," I stated. I finished by suggesting that investors should embrace the idea of a tech breakup. After all, Standard Oil was broken up in 1911 and it spawned three very large oil companies that still exist today, I pointed out. Workplace Has 3 Million UsersAt Workplace's annual conference on Oct, 8, FB announced that Workplace had reached 3 million paying users. The website hit that figure in just three years. Even more remarkable, 1 million of those users were acquired since February, meaning that Workplace has an annualized growth rate of 67%. Workplace charges $4 or $8 per worker per month. If 50% of the users generate $8 per month and 50% generate $4, Workplace's annual revenue would be over $200 million. Now, for a business with revenue of $62.6 billion over the past 12 months, $200 million+ is more like a rounding error than a real business. Separate From FacebookHowever, Slack (NYSE:WORK) recently went over 100,000 paying customers and had $145 million of revenue in Q2. So it's not such a crazy idea to think that Workplace could survive on its own. The beauty of Workplace is that it's completely separate from Facebook. The parent company doesn't have access to its corporate data."The uniqueness of Workplace is that we built the business by starting first with big companies," Julien Codorniou, vice president of Workplace said in March. "As Workplace continues to grow, the next priority is to increase adoption among smaller and mid-sized businesses, too."As Facebook continues to add third-party apps to Workplace ( it added 50 in 2018 including Microsoft's (NASDAQ:MSFT) Sharepoint), the website will continue to attract businesses of all sizes.More importantly, Workplace focuses on frontline employees while Slack and Microsoft Teams are primarily targeting white-collar knowledge workers. As Workplace looks to attract more small- and medium-sized businesses, service-oriented companies with large labor pools should be drawn to Workplace. The Bottom Line on FB StockAs another InvestorPlace columnist, Tezcan Gecgil, recently highlighted, FB stock has gone sideways over the past 20 months as its reputation has taken a hit over privacy concerns. As various stakeholders call for the breakup of big tech, I know which part of Facebook I'd send out the door first.Spinning off Workplace would be a natural move for FB. The only problem is that the IPO market is in the gutter at the moment. Maybe sometime in 2020? At the time of this writing Will Ashworth did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Super Boring Stocks to Buy With Super Safe Returns * 10 Winning Stocks to Buy and Stick With for the Long Haul * Don't Give Up on These 4 Cannabis Stocks The post Would Facebook Stock Benefit From a Workplace Spinoff? appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • TheStreet.com

    Slack Rises After Daily Active Users Exceed 12 Million in September

    The corporate communications platform says it had more than 12 million daily active users in September, an increase of 37% from a year earlier.

  • MarketWatch

    Slack says it has more than 12 million active users

    Slack Technologies Inc. said Thursday it had more than 12 million people "actively using Slack every day" in September, up about 37% year-on-year. The company also reported more than 6 million paid seats and said it had nearly 600,000 daily active registered developers. Slack last month reported second-quarter results that beat expectations, but shares fell after a weak earnings guidance for the third quarter stoked concerns about growth. Microsoft Corp. is July released statistics that suggested its Teams workplace chat app is more widely used than Slack. Shares of Slack rose 0.2% in the extended session after ending the regular trading day down 3%. The company went public in June.

  • Not All Daily Active Users Are Created Equal: Work Is Fueled by True Engagement
    Business Wire

    Not All Daily Active Users Are Created Equal: Work Is Fueled by True Engagement

    Slack Technologies, Inc., (NYSE: WORK) today announced updated engagement metrics in a blog post on the company’s website. People are moving away from email and into channels, away from legacy suites of badly connected products and onto a new customizable platform that can more easily connect the tools they use to work. In addition, with more than 6 million paid seats, the number of engaged and active people who are relying on Slack continues to grow rapidly.

  • GuruFocus.com

    SoftBank's Vision Fund Falls From Venture Capital Grace

    The telecoms giant has experienced a remarkably swift, and painful, reversal of fortunes Continue reading...

  • GlobeNewswire

    Glancy Prongay & Murray Reminds Investors of Looming Deadline in the Class Action Lawsuit Against Slack Technologies, Inc.

    Glancy Prongay & Murray LLP (“GPM”) reminds investors of the upcoming November 18, 2019 deadline to file a lead plaintiff motion in the class action filed on behalf of Slack Technologies, Inc. (“Slack” or the “Company”) (NYSE: WORK) investors who purchased Class A common stock pursuant and/or traceable to the Company’s registration statement and prospectus (collectively, the “Registration Statement”) for the resale of up to 118,429,640 shares of its Class A common stock whereby Slack began trading as a public company on or around June 20, 2019 (the “Offering”). If you are a shareholder who suffered a loss, click here to participate.

  • SLACK (WORK) DEADLINE ALERT: Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP Encourages Investors Who Suffered Losses Exceeding $100,000 In Slack Technologies, Inc. To Contact The Firm
    Newsfile

    SLACK (WORK) DEADLINE ALERT: Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP Encourages Investors Who Suffered Losses Exceeding $100,000 In Slack Technologies, Inc. To Contact The Firm

    New York, New York--(Newsfile Corp. - October 10, 2019) - Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP, a leading national securities law firm, reminds investors in Slack Technologies, Inc. (NYSE:WORK) ("Slack" or the "Company")  of the November 18, 2019 deadline to seek the role of lead plaintiff in a federal securities class action that has been filed against the Company. Faruqi and Faruqi logoCannot view this image? Visit:https://orders.newsfilecorp.com/files/6455/48656_cd8c39a954aabac4_logo_lg.jpgIf you invested in Slack stock or options pursuant ...

  • Will Slack Lose to Facebook Workplace?
    Market Realist

    Will Slack Lose to Facebook Workplace?

    With Microsoft and Facebook pricing their products aggressively, Slack might face a steep climb. Slack’s premium pricing starts at $6.67 per user per month.

  • Business Wire

    ROSEN, A TOP RANKED LAW FIRM, Reminds Slack Technologies, Inc. Investors of Important Deadline in Securities Class Action – WORK

    Rosen Law Firm, a global investor rights law firm, reminds purchasers of the securities of Slack Technologies, Inc. pursuant or traceable to Slack’s initial public offering of ordinary shares conducted in June 2019 of the important November 18, 2019 lead plaintiff deadline in the class action.

  • Robert Greifeld Warns: The Unicorn Bubble Has Burst
    Market Realist

    Robert Greifeld Warns: The Unicorn Bubble Has Burst

    On October 8, former Nasdaq CEO Robert Greifeld wrote on CNBC's website, "WeWork’s aborted IPO may come to mark the end of the current 'unicorn' bubble."

  • TheStreet.com

    Slack Technologies Drops After D.A. Davidson Lowers Price Target

    Slack Technologies fell Wednesday after the corporate communications platform was the subject of a bearish note from D.A. Davidson that lowered the stock's price target. The firm cut the price target $26 from $31 while maintaining its neutral rating after holding talks with the company's vice president of investor relations, Jesse Hulsing. D.A. Davidson noted that that the company was in the early stages of adoption by various companies that lie outside of its core vertical customer base.

  • SoftBank’s Damage From Uber, WeWork Could Exceed $5 Billion
    Bloomberg

    SoftBank’s Damage From Uber, WeWork Could Exceed $5 Billion

    (Bloomberg) -- Masayoshi Son’s startups have had a rough few months, from a botched initial public offering by WeWork to a sharp decline in shares of Uber Technologies Inc. Now analysts are beginning to calculate that the damage for Son’s SoftBank Group Corp. will likely reach into the billions of dollars.Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co. cut its profit estimate for SoftBank’s Vision Fund, its main investment vehicle, by 580 billion yen ($5.4 billion) to an operating loss of 367.6 billion yen for the September quarter, citing declines in the stock prices of Uber and Slack Technologies Inc. and the withdrawn WeWork IPO. Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. estimates that Vision Fund’s writedown alone could be as much as $5.93 billion, with another $1.24 billion drop for the portion of WeWork owned by SoftBank Group.Son is going through a particularly rocky stretch after repositioning SoftBank from a telecom operator into an investment conglomerate, with stakes in scores of startups around the world. He built a personal fortune of about $14 billion with strategic bets on companies such as China e-commerce giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. But the recent troubles have weighed on SoftBank’s shares, pushing them down about 30% from their peak earlier this year as investors grow skittish about startup valuations.“Profits in the [SoftBank Vision Fund] segment may still see considerable volatility ahead,” Mitsubishi UFJ analyst Hideaki Tanaka wrote.Uber’s share price drop was the main culprit for Vision Fund’s poor performance in the second quarter, Tanaka wrote. He also reduced SoftBank Group’s fiscal year operating profit to 1.01 trillion yen, from 1.59 trillion yen.SoftBank may book a $3.54 billion drop in the value of its Uber stake, a $750 million decline for Guardant Health Inc. and take a $350 million hit for Slack, according to Chris Lane, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein. Lane said the combined writedown for WeWork may be as much as $2.82 billion, assuming a slide in the company’s valuation to $15 billion from $24 billion, but remains uncertain. He said his estimates represent a worst-case scenario and may be offset by gains from other unlisted companies.In an interview with the Nikkei Business magazine, Son said he is unhappy with how far short his accomplishments to date have fallen of his goals.“The results still have a long way to go and that makes me embarrassed and impatient,” Son said. “I used to envy the scale of the markets in the U.S. and China, but now you see red-hot growth companies coming out of small markets like in Southeast Asia. There is just no excuse for entrepreneurs in Japan, myself included.”“It only just began and I feel there is tremendous potential there,” Son told Nikkei Business. The strategy is to invest in companies that share his vision of a world being reshaped by artificial intelligence, he said.SoftBank Gives ‘Very Public Lesson’ to Founders in WeWork OusterWeWork and Uber may be losing money now, but they will be substantially profitable in 10 years’ time, Son said in the interview. At a private retreat for portfolio companies late last month he had a different message: become profitable soon. At the gathering, held at the five-star Langham resort in Pasadena, California, Son also stressed the importance of good governance. Just days later, SoftBank led the ouster of WeWork’s controversial co-founder Adam Neumann.(Updates with Sanford C. Bernstein’s projections from second paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Pavel Alpeyev in Tokyo at palpeyev@bloomberg.net;Takahiko Hyuga in Tokyo at thyuga@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin ChanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why the 2019 IPOs May Slow the Market for New Offerings
    Investopedia

    Why the 2019 IPOs May Slow the Market for New Offerings

    In a sharp turnaround from earlier this year, stock performance for newly public companies is the worst it has been since at least 1995. This trend has led many companies to delay or reassess their IPO plans. Tech startups and other companies that went public in 2019 have seen their shares trade about 5% above their prices at the time of their IPOs while the S&P 500 has returned nearly 18% year-to-date (YTD) through Monday, per Dealogic, as cited by the Journal. That trailing IPO performance is a reversal from earlier in 2019, when IPO stocks were dramatic outperformers.

  • Benzinga

    Finding Its Stride? Option Trader Makes Big Bet Slack Rally Has Legs

    After its highly anticipated direct listing back in June, Slack Technologies Inc (NYSE: WORK) shares are down 27.1% in the past three months. On Monday morning, Benzinga Pro subscribers received an option alert related to an unusually large Slack trade. At 10:41 a.m., a trader bought 526 Slack call options with a $27 strike price expiring on Nov. 15 near the ask price at $1.25.

  • GlobeNewswire

    ROSEN, A LEADING LAW FIRM, Reminds Slack Technologies, Inc. Investors of Important November 18th Deadline in Securities Class Action - WORK

    NEW YORK, Oct. 07, 2019 -- Rosen Law Firm, a global investor rights law firm, reminds purchasers of the securities of Slack Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: WORK) pursuant or.

  • GlobeNewswire

    SHAREHOLDER ALERT - Slack Technologies, Inc. (WORK) - Bronstein, Gewirtz & Grossman, LLC Notifies Shareholders of Class Action and Lead Plaintiff Deadline: November 18, 2019

    This class action seeks to recover damages against Defendants for alleged violations of the federal securities laws under the Securities Exchange Act of 1933. If you suffered a loss in Slack you have until November 18, 2019 to request that the Court appoint you as lead plaintiff.  A lead plaintiff acts on behalf of all other class members in directing the litigation.

  • ACCESSWIRE

    INVESTOR ALERT - Slack Technologies, Inc. (WORK) - Bronstein, Gewirtz & Grossman, LLC Notifies Investors of Class Action and Lead Deadline: November 18, 2019

    NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / October 4, 2019 / Bronstein, Gewirtz & Grossman, LLC notifies investors that a class action lawsuit has been filed against Slack Technologies, Inc. ("Slack" or "the Company") (NYSE:WORK) and certain of its officers, on behalf of shareholders who purchased Slack securities pursuant or traceable to Slack's initial public offering of ordinary shares conducted in June 2019 (the "Class Period"). This class action seeks to recover damages against Defendants for alleged violations of the federal securities laws under the Securities Exchange Act of 1933.

  • Slack (WORK) Looks Good: Stock Adds 6.4% in Session
    Zacks

    Slack (WORK) Looks Good: Stock Adds 6.4% in Session

    Slack (WORK) saw a big move last session, as its shares jumped more than 6% on the day, amid huge volumes.

  • How to Succeed in Business? Major in Liberal Arts
    Bloomberg

    How to Succeed in Business? Major in Liberal Arts

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The combatants in the U.S. education wars don’t agree on much, but there’s at least one concern that most reformers and educators across the political spectrum seem to share: fear that universities aren’t producing enough science, technology, engineering and math majors. But just as states and school districts add new technology requirements and open STEM-oriented schools, leading technology companies are heading in the opposite direction, forming partnerships with liberal-arts colleges and seeking to hire their graduates.It’s a welcome development. Recent research suggests that contrary to the popular idea that majoring in art or literature is a route to personal penury and a contributor to industrial decline, there are actually plenty of science majors, except among low-income students. Moreover, while newly minted graduates with science and technical degrees enjoy a salary premium over their classmates in the humanities, that premium fades over time, in part because technological skills become obsolete faster. Liberal arts majors, by contrast, trained to be creative communicators and critical thinkers, are more adaptable.Corporations have good business reasons to embrace history, philosophy and English majors. Companies need well-rounded employees conversant in both digital and creative skills. With some additional training and investments by the government, companies can leverage both the liberal arts and digital know-how that is needed for increasingly complex technological systems.Leading business thinkers have long understood the importance of liberal arts. Works of Shakespeare, Tolstoy and Cervantes were key texts in popular business school courses taught by John Whitney, the former Pathmark president who taught at Columbia University in the 1990s, and the late James March, Stanford University’s polymath professor and co-author of the 1992 classic of business organization, “Behavioral Theory of the Firm.”The late Sidney Harman, founder of the audio-technology company Harman Kardon, told his subordinates to “get me poets as managers.” (Harman endowed a writer-in-residence program at Baruch College; I’m on the program’s selection committee.)“Poets are our original systems thinkers,” Harman said more than a decade ago. “They look at our most complex environments and they reduce the complexity to something they begin to understand.”That view is reflected in recent hiring practices at some leading technology shops. At Slack Technologies Inc., the workplace-communication software company whose chief executive holds a master’s degree in philosophy, about half the leadership team majored in the humanities. In recent congressional testimony, a senior executive at McAfee Inc., the cybersecurity company, touted a demographically and intellectually diverse workforce that includes liberal-arts majors.Infosys Ltd, the Indian technology and consulting firm that is aiming to hire 10,000 U.S. employees by the end of this year, recently launched partnerships with U.S. universities. At least two of them — one with Rhode Island School of Design in Providence and the other with Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut — are focused on harnessing the know-how of artists and liberal-arts majors.The Infosys strategy reflects the reality that while liberal-arts graduates are entering the tech workforce at record rates, their ranks have declined sharply, from 36 percent of undergraduate degrees in 1970 to just 23 percent in 2016, with most of the decrease occurring during the past decade. While some of the company’s partnerships are aimed at recruiting graduates with both STEM and liberal-arts degrees and providing training in specialized areas like health-care and food services, it is the company’s explicit focus on getting employees to bring a broader, interdisciplinary perspective to business challenges that is noteworthy.  The eight-week curriculum developed by the Rhode Island School of Design, for example, employs the same strategic design process it uses in its studio-design classes. One goal is to challenge the tendency of many employees, especially engineers, to look for a single answer to a problem. Instead, Infosys wants workers to become comfortable with uncertainty, complexity and the process of uncovering new problems.In one exercise, trainees are given a restaurant menu and asked what they see. At first, they are likely to notice food, wine and perhaps some ingredients. With time and questioning, they will begin to see farms, irrigation and transportation systems, fertilizers and supply chains, farm workers and labor laws; only by understanding the social and economic network in which the restaurant operates can they begin to imagine an improved food-delivery system.With its university training partnerships, Infosys also is addressing a shortage of corporate training programs. Peter Cappelli, director of the Center for Human Resources at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton business school, argues that when companies talk about a “skills gap,” what they really mean is that they don’t want to invest in their own employee training. Technology companies, especially, he argues in "Why Good People Can’t Get Jobs," prefer poaching employees from competitors to training them.Companies can’t do it alone, of course; building a more versatile work force also requires more government funding for colleges and universities. While the federal government spent $150 million on higher education in 2015, three times more than it budgeted 20 years ago, state governments slashed spending by 28 percent over the same period. In 2018, overall state funding for both two- and four-year colleges remained below the 2008 level. Financing of community colleges, a key to social mobility for minority students, needs special attention.The corporate embrace of liberal-arts majors is no doubt fueled in part by record-low unemployment. Companies also have to grapple with a crackdown by the administration of President Donald Trump on H1-B white-collar work visas, which allowed companies like Infosys to bring employees to the U.S., often to replace higher-paid U.S. workers. Infosys has settled claims — most recently in 2017 — that it had abused the visa process.Still, it’s creativity even more than skills that has always set apart American ingenuity and business prowess. In a shrinking global world, it’s good to see companies beginning to embrace the intellectually and demographically diverse workforce they’ll need to maintain that edge.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Gabor at Andrea.Gabor@baruch.cuny.eduTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Jonathan Landman at jlandman4@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Gabor, a former editor at Business Week and U.S. News & World Report, is the Bloomberg chair of business journalism at Baruch College of the City University of New York and the author of "After the Education Wars: How Smart Schools Upend the Business of Reform."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Benzinga

    Josh Brown Likes Slack

    Josh Brown spoke on CNBC's "Fast Money Halftime Report" about his long position in Slack Technologies Inc (NYSE: WORK ). He bought some on the IPO and then he added to the long position at $30. ...