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  • The most sought-after job in America pays $110,000 a year — if you have this skill
    Business
    MarketWatch

    The most sought-after job in America pays $110,000 a year — if you have this skill

    As companies try to understand consumer behavior, data scientists are in high demand. Boasting a median base salary of $110,000 and a job-satisfaction score of 4.4 out of 5, data scientist was ranked No. 1 on the “Best Jobs in America” list in 2016 and 2017 based on the number of job openings, salary and overall job satisfaction. It was followed by devops engineers ($110,000 a year) — which combines development, testing and operations — data engineers ($106,000 a year), tax managers ($110,000 a year) and analytics managers ($112,000 a year). And the No. 1 skill most in demand for data scientists? The programming language Python (sought after in 72% of Glassdoor job postings), followed by R (64%),

  • JPMorgan, Bank Of America Lead 4 Bank Stocks Near Buy Points After Fed Moves
    Business
    Investor's Business Daily

    JPMorgan, Bank Of America Lead 4 Bank Stocks Near Buy Points After Fed Moves

    JPMorgan (JPM), Bank of America (BAC), Morgan Stanley (MS) hovered near buy points on Thursday following the Federal Reserve decision to begin paring its massive bond holdings and sticking to a hawkish forecast for raising interest rates. PNC Financial Services (PNC) is moving into a buy zone, joining Citigroup (C). JPMorgan, which climbed 0.4% to 95.02 in morning trade in the stock market today, is in a flat base with a 95.32 buy point. Bank of America, whose large U.S. operations make it sensitive to the Fed's rate hikes, is in a shallow base with a 25.45 buy point. BofA shares edged up 1 cent to 25.07. Morgan Stanley is in a shallow base with a 49 buy point. Morgan Stanley dipped 4 cents to

  • Hewlett Packard Enterprise Slashing Employees by 10% to Cut Costs
    Business
    The Street

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise Slashing Employees by 10% to Cut Costs

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. (HPE) will cut 10% of its work force, or about 5,000 employees, in a move to cut costs in a crowding technology solutions market, Bloomberg reported. Insiders said the job cuts will start before the year's end and affect workers both domestically and internationally. The broad job cuts will affect all levels of HPE employees, including managers at the 50,000-person company. HPE has undergone sweeping change since CEO Meg Whitman began cutting divisions in 2015. Personal computers, printers, business services and software units have been reduced as Whitman has tried to position HPE to better compete with cloud providers Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) and Alphabet Inc.'s