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Stocks Fueling the Internet of Things

Stocks Fueling the Internet of Things

5.57k followers7 symbols Watchlist by The Motley Fool

The next wave of the Internet is already underway – here are seven companies poised to power this digital revolution.

7 Symbols

  • Here’s how the 30 Dow industrials companies are prepping for the impact of the coronavirus
    MarketWatch

    Here’s how the 30 Dow industrials companies are prepping for the impact of the coronavirus

    As the Dow Jones Industrial Average is in the midst of what could be its worst weekly decline since the financial crisis amid concerns regarding the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, many of the companies that make up the Dow Jones Industrial Average are preparing for potential workplace disruptions.

  • Climate Fears About Cloud Computing Have Been Vastly Overstated
    Bloomberg

    Climate Fears About Cloud Computing Have Been Vastly Overstated

    (Bloomberg) -- This has been the decade of the data center, which can be measured in a ten-fold increase in traffic and a 25-fold jump in worldwide storage. The surge was thought to come with a steep cost for the climate, since all those racks of servers run hot enough to require special cooling systems and vast amounts of energy. But data centers are rapidly becoming more energy efficient, and new research suggests there’s no longer a close link between more cloud computing and more energy use. A report published Thursday in Science credits the progress to better management, more efficient hardware and the rise of “hyperscale” data centers created by tech giants.Back in 2010, according to the report, data centers globally used about 194 terawatt-hours of electricity—about as much power as Iran used that year. By 2018 that figure had increased to 205 TWh. That’s a 6% rise in power use, in a period that saw data-center computing grow by 550%.The data-center industry’s 20% annual improvement in energy intensity dwarfs all other major parts of the economy. The power used today by data centers, 1% of the global total, is roughly the same as it was in 2010.This was an unexpected result. Analysts have extrapolated the incredible rise in cloud computing on to data-center electricity consumption “leading to unreliable predictions of current and future global data center energy use,” according to the report in Science. Instead of collecting and analyzing power-use data, some researchers had been taking the growth factor seen in data-center internet traffic and assuming energy use was growing just as quickly. This new research is the first major attempt to compile a bottom-up view of data-center energy use in a decade. Researchers based their work on reports published by Cisco Systems, Inc., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the International Energy Agency, among other sources.“We don’t have nationally reported statistics for data centers,” said Eric Masanet, lead author and a mechanical engineering professor at Northwestern University. That created a lot of work for him and his colleagues. “We don’t see these estimates come out very often.”In a blog post Thursday, Google celebrated the findings and touted the company’s own efforts at buying renewable power and cutting energy use. Urs Hölzle, senior vice president for technical infrastructure, wrote that Google can now harness about seven times as much computing power from the same amount of energy as it could five years ago. (Google and its parent company, Alphabet Inc., were not involved in the research by Masanet’s team or its funding.)Can the trend continue? The rise of hyperscale data centers and potential for better efficiency in storage means that computing and power use may continue to diverge, at least through the next doubling of data-center workloads, which is estimated to take 3 to 4 years. Masanet and his co-authors recommend policy changes to support continued efficiency gains. Government efforts such as the Energy Star program in the U.S. can include servers and networking equipment. Renewable energy can play an even bigger role in data centers through tax credits and procurement standards. Finally, there can be better data about data centers. “Data centers are becoming way too important to not rally more research behind them,” Masanet said.To contact the author of this story: Eric Roston in New York at eroston@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Aaron Rutkoff at arutkoff@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Skyworks Solutions, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:SWKS) P/E Ratio Really That Good?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Skyworks Solutions, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:SWKS) P/E Ratio Really That Good?

    The goal of this article is to teach you how to use price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll look at Skyworks...

  • Cisco Stock Falls 4%
    Investing.com

    Cisco Stock Falls 4%

    Investing.com - Cisco (NASDAQ:CSCO) Stock fell by 4.05% to trade at $40.46 by 15:51 (20:51 GMT) on Thursday on the NASDAQ exchange.

  • With Microsoft’s coronavirus warning, PC and hardware makers are probably next
    MarketWatch

    With Microsoft’s coronavirus warning, PC and hardware makers are probably next

    Now that Microsoft, the world’s most valuable tech giant, has warned investors that its PC business will not meet its recent guidance because of the impact of the coronavirus on the supply chain, the rest of the PC universe will likely follow suit.

  • A Slimmer Nokia Might Better Compete With Huawei
    Bloomberg

    A Slimmer Nokia Might Better Compete With Huawei

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The prospect is tantalizing: the Boeing Co. versus Airbus SE battle, but for the 5G era.Nokia Oyj, the Finnish telecommunications equipment firm, is contemplating asset sales and merger options, Bloomberg News reported on Wednesday. That raises the prospect of joining forces with Swedish rival Ericsson AB, thereby creating a European behemoth to compete more effectively with China’s Huawei Technologies Co.A tie-up would echo Europe’s cobbling together of Airbus in the 1960s and 1970s as a rival to U.S. aircraft-making giants like Boeing, setting up a fiercely contested duopoly that has dominated global aviation ever since. Unfortunately, it would also be a strategic misstep. Asset sales are the far more sensible option.Merging the two Nordic companies would most likely create as many problems as it would solve. Nokia has endured a tumultuous 12 months — the shares fell 25% in October after cutting its outlook — in part because of the failure to effectively integrate its last major acquisition, the $18 billion takeover of Alcatel-Lucent SA.Combining with Ericsson would make it easier to compete on price with Huawei, which benefits from the economies of scale afforded by the massive Chinese market, but it could also require several years just to secure regulatory approval, let alone integrate the operations. That would be a boon to Huawei, which could capitalize on the period of uncertainty to secure new customers.Crucially, Finland, which is one of Nokia’s five-biggest shareholders through its Solidium Oy investment vehicle, would surely stand in the way of any merger that would eliminate a lot of jobs.An acquisition by Cisco Systems Inc. would satisfy President Donald Trump’s exhortations for the U.S. to build a giant in fifth-generation wireless technology, pairing the San Jose, California-based company’s core network savvy with Nokia’s expertise in wireless communications. But it would be foolish of Cisco to tap its sizable cash pile for a deal that would dilute its margins; it enjoyed net profit representing 24% of sales last year, compared with Nokia’s 2.1%.QuicktakeHow Huawei Landed at the Center of Global Tech TussleNokia’s substandard 5G offering means Chief Executive Officer Rajeev Suri has been unable to profit on the tribulations of Huawei, and its shares have lost a third of their value over the past year. That downturn in fortunes makes it vulnerable to an approach from an activist investor scrutinizing businesses that are undervalued as part of the whole.Nokia can get ahead of that threat by putting some assets on the chopping block. Its intellectual property arm would seem the prime candidate: the division still generates healthy profits — it has a 98% gross profit margin on sales of 1.5 billion euros ($1.6 billion) — but the value of the portfolio is deteriorating steadily. Nokia could sell much of it for a lucrative sum — those parts pertaining to its old handset business, for example — while retaining the most recent patents developed for 5G. The fixed-access business, which has endured the steepest sales drop-off, might also be a candidate, according to Bloomberg Intelligence analyst John Butler.The review of options may yet come to nothing, as my Bloomberg News colleagues reported. But the last thing Suri needs is the unhelpful distraction of an activist calling for changes as he plays catch-up in 5G. It would be far better to be proactive himself.To contact the author of this story: Alex Webb at awebb25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • MarketWatch

    Walt Disney, Exxon Mobil share losses lead Dow's 50-point drop

    DOW UPDATE The Dow Jones Industrial Average is declining Wednesday afternoon with shares of Walt Disney and Exxon Mobil seeing the biggest declines for the price-weighted average. Shares of Walt Disney (DIS) and Exxon Mobil (XOM) have contributed to the index's intraday decline, as the Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 53 points lower (-0.

  • Barrons.com

    The Fear Is Worse for Markets Than the Virus, Says Ed Yardeni

    Yardeni Research considers the impact of the coronavirus on global health and the world economy to be no more dangerous than previous outbreaks such as SARS in 2003 and the MERS outbreak in 2012.

  • Top 4th-Quarter Buys of Ken Heebner's CGM
    GuruFocus.com

    Top 4th-Quarter Buys of Ken Heebner's CGM

    Growth firm reveals new investments in real estate and semiconductors Continue reading...

  • MarketWatch

    Dow falls 537 points on losses for American Express, Dow Inc. stocks

    DOW UPDATE Shares of American Express and Dow Inc. are trading lower Tuesday afternoon, leading the Dow Jones Industrial Average selloff. Shares of American Express (AXP) and Dow Inc. (DOW) are contributing to the blue-chip gauge's intraday decline, as the Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 537 points, or 1.

  • Analysts Estimate Ambarella (AMBA) to Report a Decline in Earnings: What to Look Out for
    Zacks

    Analysts Estimate Ambarella (AMBA) to Report a Decline in Earnings: What to Look Out for

    Ambarella (AMBA) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • MarketWatch

    American Express, Dow Inc. share losses contribute to Dow's nearly 300-point fall

    DOW UPDATE Shares of American Express and Dow Inc. are trading lower Tuesday morning, leading the Dow Jones Industrial Average selloff. The Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 295 points lower (-1.1%), as shares of American Express (AXP) and Dow Inc.

  • What if it was the Marvel Cybersecurity Universe?
    MarketWatch

    What if it was the Marvel Cybersecurity Universe?

    The cybersecurity industry has long been known as a battleground pitting black hats against white hats, but what happens when the biggest combatant picks up the Infinity Gauntlet instead?

  • Cisco unleashes ‘Thanos’ in hopes for a ‘radical simplification’ of security software
    MarketWatch

    Cisco unleashes ‘Thanos’ in hopes for a ‘radical simplification’ of security software

    Cisco Systems Inc. is hoping to restore order into a universe of frazzled security professionals with a “radical simplification” that could reduce the number of hungry mouths in a crowded marketplace.

  • GuruFocus.com

    US Indexes Close Lower Monday as Coronavirus Spreads

    Dow Jones falls 1,031.61 points Continue reading...

  • Palo Alto Networks Aims To Derail Fortinet Stock In Hot SD-WAN Market
    Investor's Business Daily

    Palo Alto Networks Aims To Derail Fortinet Stock In Hot SD-WAN Market

    Whether Palo Alto Networks will be able to slow down Fortinet in the emerging SD-WAN market is a key question for both cybersecurity stocks, says one analyst.

  • HP CEO sends a major message to Xerox: Go away, we don't need you
    Yahoo Finance

    HP CEO sends a major message to Xerox: Go away, we don't need you

    HP management sends a clear message to would he acquirer Xerox.

  • MarketWatch

    UnitedHealth, American Express share losses lead Dow's 862-point fall

    DOW UPDATE Behind losses for shares of UnitedHealth and American Express, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is slumping Monday afternoon. Shares of UnitedHealth (UNH) and American Express (AXP) have contributed to the blue-chip gauge's intraday decline, as the Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 862 points, or 3.

  • Baltimore-area stocks plummet as markets fall amid coronavirus outbreak
    American City Business Journals

    Baltimore-area stocks plummet as markets fall amid coronavirus outbreak

    Fears about the growing coronavirus outbreak caused the stock market to fall sharply on Monday, taking the stocks of Greater Baltimore's biggest public companies down with it. The Dow Jones Industrial Average opened down more than 800 points following news that the deadly virus has spread beyond China and into Italy, South Korea and Iran.

  • Jeff Auxier Buys 5 Stocks in 4th Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    Jeff Auxier Buys 5 Stocks in 4th Quarter

    Guru also gains position in ViacomCBS Continue reading...

  • Bloomberg

    Does This Investment Make Me Look Good?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- One of the trendiest ideas in finance is something called “social impact investing,” which is the idea that people should put more money into socially beneficial companies and products, and less into socially harmful ones. That hardly sounds objectionable, but I am skeptical about how much good social impact investing can do.The first risk is that social impact investing will be used to “whitewash” various harmful policies. By divesting from a particular set of companies, an investment fund loses at most a very small benefit from an additional degree of broader market diversification. The fund still is likely to earn the market rate of return on its other investments, and in the meantime it can claim virtuousness. At the same time, the funds can pursue socially harmful policies elsewhere: investing in companies that lobby for tariff protection, say, or emit less visible forms of pollution, or how about refined sugar?A second risk is that social impact investing simply redistributes wealth from investments — maybe to less socially conscientious individuals. Imagine a socially conscious investment firm that declines to participate in the initial public offering of a company that pollutes the ocean. That might create downward pressure on the price of the IPO. But there is a problem: The value of the actual investment has not declined, so at a potentially lower IPO price other investors will step in to fill the demand. In fact, those investors may have the chance to buy at a discount and earn a higher return than otherwise.The net result is that conscientious investors have missed out on a profitable opportunity, while less socially aware investors have earned more. Over time, the less socially aware investors will become richer, and their greater wealth may translate into greater political and economic influence.Maybe this effect isn’t large, but it is negative, and it will become correspondingly larger to the extent social impact investing becomes more popular (in 2018, the money pouring into sustainable investment funds quadrupled, rising to about $21 billion). That doesn’t sound like an appealing trade-off.But put that worry aside and assume that social impact investing simply makes it easier to get a solar power company off the ground with an IPO or an expansion. It’s still not clear that much has been gained. At that late point in the process, the company will succeed or it won’t, no matter what the socially conscious funds do.If anything, it would be more useful to have socially conscious research and development at the very early stages of projects. To some extent there are such investments, and I am more sanguine about being conscientious then than when companies already exist and funds are making investment decisions.It is also difficult to monitor the performance and social efficacy of the funds focused on doing good. In actively managed sustainable equity funds, for example, the most commonly held stocks are estimated to be Microsoft, Alphabet, Visa, Apple and Cisco. I have nothing against those companies, but you have to wonder exactly how much social improvement those investment funds are buying.Norway’s fossil fuel divestment is well-publicized. Less well known is that it exempted Shell and Exxon. There simply aren’t clear benchmarks for which investments to avoid, and of course some critics will portray technology companies as the embodiment of evil.Too many of the empirical arguments for social impact investing stem from a single example: South Africa under apartheid. In that case, a coordinated campaign of divestment and international economic and social pressure did hasten the end of apartheid, all for the better. But most sanctions are not very effective at achieving their stated political goals, or their effectiveness may be unclear. South Africa may have been a special case because it was relatively small and isolated, and because so many South Africans had ceased to believe in apartheid.Investment in socially beneficial activities can be worthwhile. But it ignores the question of who decides what is “beneficial,” and it is yet another example of how politics and media are becomingly increasingly performative. Everything is about looking good instead of substance. It is increasingly difficult for businesses and investment funds to perform their proper work under the glare of perpetual debate and periodic condemnation.The notion of extending that same glare to economic investments makes is hardly reassuring. I’ve yet to see a conception of social impact investing that I find convincing.To contact the author of this story: Tyler Cowen at tcowen2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Newman at mnewman43@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tyler Cowen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is a professor of economics at George Mason University and writes for the blog Marginal Revolution. His books include "Big Business: A Love Letter to an American Anti-Hero."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Is Skyworks (SWKS) Down 10.6% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is Skyworks (SWKS) Down 10.6% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Skyworks (SWKS) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Will the shows go on? Coronavirus, MWC cancellation hang over tech conferences
    MarketWatch

    Will the shows go on? Coronavirus, MWC cancellation hang over tech conferences

    The abandonment of a show as big as Mobile World Congress stings economically for the host city, mobile industry and entrepreneurs from across the globe who attend in hopes of doing deals. And it could just be the beginning.