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Most Bought By Hedge Funds

Most Bought By Hedge Funds

10.41k followers30 symbols Watchlist by Yahoo Finance

Follow this list to discover and track the stocks that were bought the most by hedge funds in the last quarter.

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  • Facebook's prototype VR bangle squeezes and vibrates your wrists
    Engadget4 hours ago

    Facebook's prototype VR bangle squeezes and vibrates your wrists

    If VR is ever going to go mainstream, it's going to need to ditch the bulkyaccessories while still letting people interact with the virtual world

  • Earnings extravaganza, Q2 GDP — What to know in the week ahead
    Yahoo Finance20 hours ago

    Earnings extravaganza, Q2 GDP — What to know in the week ahead

    This week, the focus will be on earnings and second-quarter GDP data to be released at the end of the week.

  • Nasdaq, Chips Lead Early Gains; Disney Stock Lifts Dow Jones Industrial Index
    Investor's Business Daily7 minutes ago

    Nasdaq, Chips Lead Early Gains; Disney Stock Lifts Dow Jones Industrial Index

    The Nasdaq led stocks higher Monday as three chip stock upgrades sweetened early trade. Disney topped the Dow Jones industrial index.

  • Is eBay (EBAY) a Great Value Stock Right Now?
    Zacks56 minutes ago

    Is eBay (EBAY) a Great Value Stock Right Now?

    Here at Zacks, our focus is on the proven Zacks Rank system, which emphasizes earnings estimates and estimate revisions to find great stocks. Nevertheless, we are always paying attention to the latest value, growth, and momentum trends to underscore strong picks.

  • MarketWatch56 minutes ago

    Ebay names two executives, vets from Amazon and Twitter

    Ebay Inc. said Monday that it has named two new executives, who will be joining the executive leadership team. Pete Thompson, eBay's new chief product officer, joins from Amazon.com Inc. where he was vice president of Alexa Voice Service. Mazen Rawashdeh, who previously spent eight years with eBay between 2003 and 2011, has been appointed eBay's chief technology officer. He previously served as a vice president at Twitter Inc. and spent four years as an angel investor and tech advisor. Ebay stock has edged up 0.8% in Monday premarket trading, and has rallied 43.3% in 2019. The S&P 500 index has gained 18.7% this year so far. Read: Ebay shares rise after earnings beat but Amazon looms large

  • Hasbro Could Romp in Its Q2 Showing
    Motley Fool1 hour ago

    Hasbro Could Romp in Its Q2 Showing

    A lineup of blockbuster movies and a better financial outlook hint at what's in store for the toy maker.

  • These $100B+ Stocks are Must-Buys Ahead of Q2 Earnings
    Zacks1 hour ago

    These $100B+ Stocks are Must-Buys Ahead of Q2 Earnings

    Several sector bellwethers are projected to outperform their earnings estimates this week.

  • Market Realist1 hour ago

    What to Expect from Freeport-McMoRan’s Q2 Earnings

    Freeport-McMoRan (FCX), the largest publicly traded copper miner, is expected to release its second-quarter earnings results on June 24.

  • Market Realist1 hour ago

    Economic Data and Earnings Before the Fed’s Meeting

    Economic data and earnings will keep investors busy this week. More than a quarter of the S&P; 500 companies are scheduled to release their earnings.

  • TheStreet.com1 hour ago

    Big Tech Earnings: Three Things to Know For Facebook, Amazon, Google

    Facebook, Amazon and Google report earnings in late July. What more could an investor ask for? Here are three key facts.

  • What's in Store for STMicroelectronics' (STM) Q2 Earnings?
    Zacks1 hour ago

    What's in Store for STMicroelectronics' (STM) Q2 Earnings?

    STMicroelectronics' (STM) Q2 results are likely to gain from robust products & solid execution. Uncertainty in some of the end-markets served and the ongoing U.S.-China trade war pose serious threats.

  • Reuters1 hour ago

    US STOCKS-Wall St set to open higher as earnings season gathers steam

    Wall Street's main indexes were set to open higher on Monday as investors eyed fresh trade developments between the United States and China during a busy week of corporate earnings, with results from marquee names including Facebook and Amazon on tap. The South China Morning Post reported U.S. trade negotiators will likely visit China next week for their first face-to-face talk with Chinese officials since the G20 meeting, when Trump held off on fresh tariffs on Chinese goods.

  • What's in the Offing for Alphabet's (GOOGL) Q2 Earnings?
    Zacks1 hour ago

    What's in the Offing for Alphabet's (GOOGL) Q2 Earnings?

    Alphabet's (GOOGL) focus on artificial intelligence and cloud is likely to boost second-quarter results. However, higher expenses and litigation charges are headwinds.

  • What's in the Cards for Xerox (XRX) This Earnings Season?
    Zacks1 hour ago

    What's in the Cards for Xerox (XRX) This Earnings Season?

    Xerox's (XRX) second-quarter 2019 results are likely to reflect weakness in transactional revenues.

  • Rollins (ROL) to Post Q2 Earnings: What's in the Offing?
    Zacks2 hours ago

    Rollins (ROL) to Post Q2 Earnings: What's in the Offing?

    Rollins' (ROL) second-quarter 2019 earnings and revenues are likely to improve year over year.

  • Dow Jones Futures: For Stock Market, Amazon, Facebook, ServiceNow, Zscaler, Keep Both Eyes Open
    Investor's Business Daily2 hours ago

    Dow Jones Futures: For Stock Market, Amazon, Facebook, ServiceNow, Zscaler, Keep Both Eyes Open

    Stock futures: After the stock market reversed Friday, Amazon, Facebook, ServiceNow are back to buy points ahead of earnings this week. What should you do?

  • Financial Times2 hours ago

    FirstFT: Today’s top stories 

    Iran claims to have demolished a spy ring of 17 Iranian nationals who worked in the country’s military and nuclear centres and were trained by US intelligence agents. An Iranian intelligence official said some of the 17 alleged spies had been sentenced to death while some others were co-operating with Iran’s intelligence services to gather information from the US.

  • 4 Big-Brand American Stocks Set to Beat Earnings This Week
    Zacks2 hours ago

    4 Big-Brand American Stocks Set to Beat Earnings This Week

    We highlight big-brand companies set to beat earnings in one of the busiest earnings stretches this season. These companies boast stable cash flow and have established business models.

  • Facebook earnings seem immune to the Big Tech backlash — for now
    MarketWatch2 hours ago

    Facebook earnings seem immune to the Big Tech backlash — for now

    The $5 billion bomb the Federal Trade Commission is expected to drop on Facebook Inc. would seem to presage choppy waters for the social-media company, but investors hardly seem to care.

  • Atlanta-filmed 'Avengers: Endgame' flies to highest-grossing film of all time
    American City Business Journals3 hours ago

    Atlanta-filmed 'Avengers: Endgame' flies to highest-grossing film of all time

    Atlanta is now home of the highest-grossing film of all time. Marvel's "Avengers: Endgame" took the crown from 2009's "Avatar" this weekend, amassing an estimated $2.79 billion in worldwide sales over a 13-week run, topping Avatar's previous record of $2.

  • Bloomberg4 hours ago

    Money Doesn’t Deserve the Bad Rap It’s Getting

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Money gets a bad rap. In the current environment, amid levels of inequality not seen since the 1920s, too many people find it too easy to disparage wealth and the quest for material goods. There is no doubt that lifestyle creep and the hedonic treadmill are not the paths to true happiness. But what we see today is a backlash caused, in part, by the hangover from the 2007-09 financial crisis.During the run up to the crisis, America went on a debt bender: offer people almost-free money, and they will inevitably use it to buy homes and other goods they believe will raise their standards of living. This is especially true for a consumer population that a) hasn't had after inflation raises in wages in three decades, and b) many of whom previously did not have access to credit or mortgage markets. When it turned out those homes they thought would rise in value fell, and the cost of paying back the cheap loans soared, the end result should surprise no one.Yes, consumer deserve blame, but they weren't alone. Businesses went on a binge too, and not just on Wall Street. Real estate developers blanketed the country with more shopping venues than the country could possibly need. The U.S. now has more retail space than any other nation -- 7.3 square feet per capita, versus 1.7 square feet in Japan and France, and about six times the level of the U.K. In the post-crisis era, retail has gone through a wrenching retrenchment, with dead malls and vacant store fronts, creating blight in urban and suburban real estate markets alike.Thus the rise of the spending-and-borrowing nags. This backlash takes several forms, but a few stand out as especially lacking in merit.Let’s call the first group the spend-shamers. These are the scolds who claim that if you only stop buying coffee or avocado toast you will eventually become rich. (Trust me, you won't.) Spend-shaming often focuses on minutia, while ignoring much bigger issues, like student debt, gender-pay inequality and the lack of real, or inflation adjusted, wage gains.The so-called FIRE movement is another example. The acronym describes the "financial independence, retire early" lifestyle of radically cutting spending in order save enough and then opt out of the rat race -- because, after all, the quest for money and the things it can buy are ultimately unfulfilling. The idea behind FIRE is that by embracing radical austerity one can theoretically build up a nest egg large enough to retire early, in your 30s or 40s, which then leads to greater happiness. Color me skeptical: I love the idea of financial independence, but consider the horrifying implications of stressing when a house guest takes a little longer than you might like taking a hot shower. (This, by the way, is a real example from the FIRE movement).Some confusion between happiness and life satisfaction might be at fault here. Happiness has been tied up with money for a long time, so this is an important aspect of the debate. Several researchers in the field have written definitive takes on the issue.Psychologists and economists have helped resolve some of these issues. Danny Kahneman and Angus Deaton have explained that money buys some degree of happiness, but plateaus rather quickly. They note emotional well-being, or the “quality of an individual’s everyday experience—the frequency and intensity of experiences of joy, stress, sadness, anger, and affection that make one’s life pleasant or unpleasant,” rises with income to about $75,000, then tops out. They also found the opposite to be true -- that people with below-average incomes report a lot of sadness and worry. “Poverty exacerbates the effect of adverse circumstances,” they wrote. It is also true across various countries and cultures. David Leonhardt, writing in the New York Times 2008 before the financial crisis, noted “People in poor countries, not surprisingly, did become happier once they could afford basic necessities.”The issue of life satisfaction is trickier. Happiness may change day to day, but the broader measure of life satisfaction seems to have a more direct correlation with money. That is reflected in the findings of Justin Wolfers and Betsey Stevenson. Their research found that people with higher incomes tend to report higher levels of life satisfaction. Not only that, but countries report higher levels of happiness as they get richer.Evolutionary history suggests people need some struggle and a degree of accomplishment in that struggle to become fulfilled.(1) Money does not buy happiness, or at least not very much of it. But it does lead to greater life satisfaction, which over the longer term may matter more. And that is a huge reason to appreciate money and what it can do for you.(1) Spending what should be your most productive work years not working does not sound like it leads to a lot of life satisfaction, but I expect your short game would improve measurably.To contact the author of this story: Barry Ritholtz at britholtz3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Greiff at jgreiff@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Barry Ritholtz is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He founded Ritholtz Wealth Management and was chief executive and director of equity research at FusionIQ, a quantitative research firm. He is the author of “Bailout Nation.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • How Do Analysts See Southern Copper Corporation (NYSE:SCCO) Performing Over The Next Year?
    Simply Wall St.4 hours ago

    How Do Analysts See Southern Copper Corporation (NYSE:SCCO) Performing Over The Next Year?

    After Southern Copper Corporation's (NYSE:SCCO) earnings announcement in March 2019, analyst consensus outlook appear...

  • Bitcoin's Catch-22 Will Keep It From Spurring a Monetary Revolution
    Motley Fool4 hours ago

    Bitcoin's Catch-22 Will Keep It From Spurring a Monetary Revolution

    Bitcoin may be hot now, but the future for the world's largest cryptocurrency isn't so bright.

  • A Look At The Intrinsic Value Of Southern Copper Corporation (NYSE:SCCO)
    Simply Wall St.4 hours ago

    A Look At The Intrinsic Value Of Southern Copper Corporation (NYSE:SCCO)

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of Southern Copper Corporation (NYSE:SCCO) by...

  • TheStreet.com4 hours ago

    [video]Stocks Rise Modestly as Tech-Heavy Earnings Week Begins

    Stocks rise modestly on Monday as investors prepare for a week of earnings reports and try to read the Federal Reserve's thinking on interest rates.