• Analyst: VOD deal between NBCUniversal, AMC will likely 'dampen movie attendance,' hurt industry
    Yahoo Finance

    Analyst: VOD deal between NBCUniversal, AMC will likely 'dampen movie attendance,' hurt industry

    NBCUniversal and AMC’s historic theatrical deal is groundbreaking for the industry — but it could spell trouble for smaller theater chains across the United States.

  • Dow Jones Today Rises As Microsoft Courts TikTok; Varian Soars On Siemens Deal; Incyte, Co-Diagnostics FDA News
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Today Rises As Microsoft Courts TikTok; Varian Soars On Siemens Deal; Incyte, Co-Diagnostics FDA News

    Incyte paced the Nasdaq, Microsoft led the Dow Jones, and stock futures rose as global markets rallied on strong manufacturing data.

  • MarketWatch

    Beyond Meat is heading to Sam's Club and BJ's Wholesale

    Beyond Meat Inc. said Monday that its Beyond Burgers will be sold at Walmart Inc.'s warehouse chain Sam's Club, and at BJ's Wholesale Club Holdings Inc. . Beyond Meat began selling at Costco Wholesale Corp. last summer. The news comes just days after rival plant-based burger maker Impossible Foods Inc. began rolling out its Impossible Burgers at nearly 2,100 Walmart Supercenters and Neighborhood Markets nationwide. Walmart is also selling Impossible Burgers on its website. Beyond Meat stock is up 2.5% in Monday premarket trading, and has soared 66.5% for the year to date. The S&P 500 index is up 1.3% for 2020 so far.

  • Dow Jones Futures Rise As Coronavirus Stock Market Rally Awaits Stimulus Deal; Microsoft Confirms TikTok Talks
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Futures Rise As Coronavirus Stock Market Rally Awaits Stimulus Deal; Microsoft Confirms TikTok Talks

    The stock market rally awaits stimulus deal progress and earnings from big 2020 winners. Microsoft is rising in a buy zone as it confirms TikTok talks.

  • Reuters

    GLOBAL MARKETS-Summer mood swings: markets turn higher on hopes of virus aid

    In Europe, stocks were up 1.2% as technology stocks rallied on positive read-across from peers on the other side of the Atlantic, offsetting a selloff in big banks' shares after results. U.S. stock futures were up 0.5% with jittery investors cautiously adding positions, expecting progress on the stimulus package and on hopes of a COVID-19 treatment - as Eli Lilly started a late-stage study of a drug to see whether it can contain the virus in nursing homes.

  • TheStreet.com

    A Narrowing Market: Big Caps Drive the Top, Speculative Junk the Bottom

    The month of July ended with a bang for the stock market with big-cap technology stocks ramping into the finish line. The biggest stock in the market, Apple , hit a new all-time high with a surge of over 10% but that covered weakness in thousands of smaller stocks that did not participate in the move. There are also pockets of speculative action that are constantly shifting.

  • Barrons.com

    A Giant Pension Sold Apple and Intel Stock. Here Are Two Stocks It Bought.

    The New York State Teachers’ Retirement System trimmed investments in Apple and Intel stock in the second quarter. The pension also bought more Nvidia and AbbVie stock.

  • Here’s why Apple’s stock split might not be so bullish for its shares
    MarketWatch

    Here’s why Apple’s stock split might not be so bullish for its shares

    Apple’s (AAPL) planned 4-for-1 stock split announcement last week would normally be an extremely bullish signal for the U.S. market. A stock split typically is a bullish signal because it signaled management’s confidence that its stock would perform well in subsequent months and years. If it trades far above that sweet spot, they would split their stock only if they believed the price wouldn’t otherwise fall back into that range.

  • Reuters

    GLOBAL MARKETS-Investors cautious as U.S. lawmakers wrangle over virus aid

    World stocks began August cautiously as U.S. lawmakers struggled to agree on the next round of coronavirus aid, though a squeeze on crowded short positions left the dollar clinging to a tentative bounce. In Europe, stocks were up 0.7% as technology stocks rallied on positive read-across from peers on the other side of the Atlantic, but gains were limited by a selloff in big banks' shares. U.S. stock futures were pointing to a muted open with jittery investors sitting on the sidelines amid the lack of a progress on the stimulus package and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows not optimistic about a deal.

  • Here Are the Top 10 Most Popular Stocks on Robinhood
    Motley Fool

    Here Are the Top 10 Most Popular Stocks on Robinhood

    Stocks are America's favorite investment. More Americans believe investing in the stock market is a better option than investing in real estate over the next decade, according to a new study by Bankrate. The commission-free stock-trading platform allows new and experienced investors alike to quickly and cost-effectively invest in their favorite companies.

  • 3 Dividend-Paying Tech Stocks to Buy in August
    Motley Fool

    3 Dividend-Paying Tech Stocks to Buy in August

    The S&P 500 (SNPINDEX: ^GSPC) is near breakeven in 2020, but the tech-heavy Nasdaq (NASDAQINDEX: ^IXIC) has crushed the broader market, gaining about 18%. Under the watchful eye of Satya Nadella, who took the helm at Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) in early 2014, the company has enjoyed a striking renaissance. The company has become a cloud leader in just a few short years and continues to give Amazon Web Services (AWS) a run for its money.

  • Big Tech Faithful Shouldn’t Ignore Antitrust Risk
    Bloomberg

    Big Tech Faithful Shouldn’t Ignore Antitrust Risk

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Monopoly power is a good gig if you can get it. The trouble is keeping lawmakers from knocking on your door. Tech titans Apple Inc., Amazon.com Inc., Facebook Inc. and Google parent Alphabet Inc. managed to do just that until last week, when a House subcommittee summoned the chief executive officers of the four companies. Lawmakers took a dim view of the tech giants’ grip on their respective industries. “These companies as they exist today have monopoly power,” said Representative David Cicilline of Rhode Island, who leads the House investigation into the companies. His prescription: “Some need to be broken up, all need to be heavily regulated.” The sentiment appeared to be shared widely.As a matter of public policy, the issue is relatively straightforward. Monopolies are trouble, which is why antitrust laws are designed to stop them. They have the power to raise prices and thereby stifle demand. They often turn into big, lazy, unwieldy bureaucracies that have little incentive to innovate or look after customers, workers and suppliers. And perhaps most problematic, they can use their money and influence to seize political power, making it more difficult to dislodge them.   There’s little disagreement that Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google pose such a threat. Apple controls nearly half the U.S. smartphone market and dominates the distribution of apps; Amazon all but controls e-commerce; Facebook rules social media; and Google  has a firm grip on internet search and online advertising. It’s difficult to overstate their power. The four companies make up just 0.8% of the S&P 500 Index by number, and yet they account for 6.1% of its total revenue, 8.9% of its earnings and 16.8% of its market value. For investors, the issue is a bit more complicated. Monopolies are impregnable money-minting machines, so everyone wants a piece of them. It’s no accident that Apple, Amazon, Alphabet and Facebook  are four of the seven biggest companies in the world by market value. Nor is it surprising that their profits have trickled down to shareholders. An equal investment in the four tech giants since Facebook — the youngest of the bunch — went public in 2012 has produced a return of 31% a year, including dividends, more than double the return from the S&P 500 over the same period.  It turns out they’re not alone. Stocks of highly profitable companies tend to beat the market. Shares of the most profitable 30% of U.S. companies, sorted on return on equity and weighted by market value, outpaced the S&P 500 by 1.6 percentage points a year from July 1963 through June, according to the longest data series compiled by Dartmouth professor Ken French. And they did so with roughly the same amount of volatility as the broad market, as measured by standard deviation, a common proxy for risk.Astonishingly, the odds of capturing this profitability premium favored investors regardless of the holding period. Shares of the most profitable companies outpaced the market 65% of the time over rolling one-year periods, 76% of the time over three years, 83% over five years and a whopping 93% over 10 years, counted monthly.But markets aren’t supposed to work this way. You shouldn’t be able to reliably beat the market using widely available information without taking more risk. One explanation for the profitability premium is that investors are rubes: They don’t pay attention to profitability when picking stocks, or worse, they errantly favor less-profitable companies, allowing more cunning investors to exploit their mistakes. That seems unlikely. Profitability has long been a key feature of security analysis. More recently, there has been a proliferation of indexes, and funds tracking them, that pick or weight stocks based in part on profitability. And as the market value of Apple, Amazon, Alphabet and Facebook show, their shares are hugely popular.  A more plausible explanation is that the profitability premium is compensation for the risk that today’s profits will evaporate tomorrow. Highly profitable companies rarely maintain the same level of profitability. More often, competition squeezes it away or, as in the case of Apple and its cohorts, the competition is crushed or acquired, resulting in greater market share and profitability but also inviting lawmakers and regulators to step in.Microsoft Inc.’s antitrust entanglement with the government in the late 1990s is instructive. Bill Gates and Paul Allen founded the company in 1975, and by the early 1990s, most personal computers ran Microsoft’s operating system, first MS-DOS and then Microsoft Windows. In August 1997, the company became the second largest in the U.S. by market value, behind only General Electric. A year later, in May 1998, the U.S. Department of Justice and 20 U.S. states sued Microsoft, accusing it of attempting to illegally protect and extend its monopoly by undermining competitors. By the time the case was argued in early 2001, much of the evidence against Microsoft had spilled into public view. Although profits continued to grow, the legal and regulatory scrutiny around the company clouded its future, and shareholders paid the price. The stock returned a negative 4% from May 1998 to December 2000, even as the Nasdaq Composite Index and the S&P 500 returned 33% and 23%, respectively, over the same time. Several months later, a federal court found that Microsoft had violated federal antitrust laws.  As it turned out, of course, Microsoft has maintained its status as a tech powerhouse. Today, its market value is second only to Apple among U.S. stocks, and shareholders who stuck with the company through its antitrust battles have been richly rewarded. Microsoft has returned 27% a year since it went public in 1986, compared with 11% and 10% a year for the Nasdaq and S&P 500, respectively. But that was far from a foregone conclusion when Microsoft was in the government’s crosshairs. And if lawmakers, regulators or prosecutors muster the will to go after Apple, Amazon, Facebook or Alphabet, their shareholders should prepare for more paltry returns and perhaps worse. For now, investors don’t seem worried that the tech titans are in danger. All four of their stocks were higher after the hearing than before. And all four companies reported financial results that beat analysts’ expectations a day after the hearing, no doubt emboldening their shareholders. Still, Big Tech’s faithful should bear in mind that monopolies are only as durable as a government that tolerates them. The profitability they enjoy, and the skyrocketing stock prices that accompany it, are no free lunch. They’re payment for the risk that lawmakers are more serious about breaking up or regulating the tech titans than investors seem to believe.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nir Kaissar is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the markets. He is the founder of Unison Advisors, an asset management firm. He has worked as a lawyer at Sullivan & Cromwell and a consultant at Ernst & Young. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Has Taken a Turn for the Better. And the Stock Is Higher.

    Berkshire (ticker BRK.A) has deployed capital in new investments in the energy pipeline sector and (BAC) (BAC) and made a disclosure that implied a sizable stock buyback of about $5 billion in the second quarter. Its largest equity holding, (AAPL) (AAPL), is on a roll and Berkshire’s stake in the company now totals about $100 billion, almost 20% of its market value of $474 billion. Berkshire is hardly a favorite on Wall Street, but the situation is better than at the end of June, when shares were off 21% for the year Berkshire is now down 14% in 2020, versus a 2% total return for the S&P. The Class A shares were up 0.8% on Friday, at $293,631, while the Class B stock rose 0.8%, to $195.78.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of BAC.N earnings conference call or presentation 16-Jul-20 12:30pm GMT

    Q2 2020 Bank of America Corp Earnings Call

  • Chinese artificial intelligence company files $1.4 billion lawsuit against Apple
    Reuters

    Chinese artificial intelligence company files $1.4 billion lawsuit against Apple

    Chinese artificial intelligence company Shanghai Zhizhen Intelligent Network Technology Co., Ltd., also known as Xiao-i, has filed a lawsuit against Apple Inc, alleging it has infringed on its patents. The company is calling for 10 billion yuan ($1.43 billion)in damages and demands that Apple cease "manufacturing, using, promising to sell, selling, and importing" products that infringe on the patent, it said in a social media post. Xiao-i argued that Apple's voice-recognition technology Siri infringes on a patent that it applied for in 2004 and was granted in 2009.

  • Apple Buys Mobile Startup Mobeewave For $100M To Enable Contactless Payments: Report
    Benzinga

    Apple Buys Mobile Startup Mobeewave For $100M To Enable Contactless Payments: Report

    Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL) has purchased contactless mobile payment startup Mobeewave Inc. for $100 milllion, according to a Bloomberg report late Friday.What Happened The Tim Cook-led company is reportedly retaining Mobeewave's team, which will continue to operate out of its home base in Montreal, Canada."Apple buys smaller technology companies from time to time and we generally do not discuss our purpose or plans," a spokesperson for the Cupertino-based company said in a statement -- a message it typically reiterates when it intends to confirm an acquistion.The smartphone maker already has an Apple Pay service on its iPhones since 2014 and could potentially use Mobeewave's technology to enable those devices to accept payments without involving additional hardware, Bloomberg noted.The Montreal-based startup's technology enables smartphones and credit cards to make payments using a second smartphone with near field communications (NFC) without any extra hardware.Why It Matters Jack Dorsey-led Square Inc (NYSE: SQ) competes in the mobile payments space but its payment system uses hardware.Last year, Mobeewave allowed Samsung Electronics Co Ltd's (OTC: SSNLF) phones to use the technology. The Korean technology titan is also an investor in the payments company, which has raised $20 million so far, Pitchbook data revealed. Apple acquired the hyperlocal weather app Dark Sky in March and the virtual reality startup NextVR in May.Last week, Cook along with CEOs of Facebook Inc (NASDAQ: FB), Amazon.com, Inc (NASDAQ: AMZN) and Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ: GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOG) appeared before the House Antitrust Subcommittee. The questions in that hearing broached on the matter of antitrust concerns related to the technology giant's acquisitions.Price Action Apple shares traded 0.56% higher at $427.40 in pre-market session Monday.Photo by Marco Verch on Flickr.See more from Benzinga * Apple Wants 50% UK Store Rent Discounts In Line With Deals Offered To Other Retailers By Desperate Landlords * Apple Expects A Delay In iPhone 12 Series Launch * Apple Faces Fresh EU Antitrust Complaint Filed By Messaging App Telegram(C) 2020 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

  • Reuters

    GLOBAL MARKETS-U.S. gridlock over stimulus keeps stocks muted, dollar edges higher

    World stocks began August cautiously as U.S. lawmakers struggled to agree a new stimulus plan following a global surge of COVID-19 cases, though a squeeze on crowded short positions left the dollar clinging to a tentative bounce. European stocks opened slightly higher on Monday following mixed moves in Asia. E-Mini futures for the S&P 500 were little changed, with investors nervous about the lack of a new stimulus package in the United States and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows not optimistic about a deal.

  • Apple Snaps Up Canadian Payment Startup Mobeewave For $100M – Report
    SmarterAnalyst

    Apple Snaps Up Canadian Payment Startup Mobeewave For $100M – Report

    Apple Inc. (AAPL) has snapped up Canadian mobile payment processing startup Mobeewave Inc., in a deal valued at $100 million, according to a Bloomberg report.Mobeewave’s technology lets shoppers tap their credit card or smartphone on another phone to process a payment. The system works with an app and doesn’t require hardware beyond a Near Field Communications, or NFC, chip, which iPhones have included since 2014.As part of the purchase deal, the California-based technology giant will retain Mobeewave’s dozens of employees, who will continue to work out of Montreal.“Apple buys smaller technology companies from time to time and we generally do not discuss our purpose or plans,” an Apple spokesman told Bloomberg.Apple has in the past purchased startups to turn their technology into features of its products. Apple added Apple Pay to the iPhone in 2014, allowing users to pay for physical goods with a tap in retail stores. Last year, it launched its own credit card, the Apple Card. Integrating Mobeewave could let anyone with an iPhone accept payments without additional hardware.This would put Apple into direct competition with the likes of Square Inc., a leading provider of payment hardware and software for smartphones and tablets.Mobeewave last year partnered with Samsung Electronics for their phones to deploy its technology. Samsung’s venture arm is also an investor in the startup, which has raised more than $20 million.Shares in Apple have surged 45% this year as stay-at-home orders during the coronavirus pandemic have been good for business. The pandemic has created opportunities for companies like Apple who are weathering the crisis well and are looking to increase their reach and boost market share.The iPhone maker has been on a shopping spree this year with the acquisition of weather app Dark Sky, virtual reality video streaming startup NextVR, artificial intelligence startup Voysis, and Fleetsmith for enterprise device management.Following Apple’s Q2 results last week, Barclays analyst Tim Long raised his price target to $400 (5.9% downside potential) from $326 but maintained a Hold rating on the stock, saying that the current multiple "fully reflects the upside in services and a 5G iPhone”.Long cautioned that while the iPad and Mac outlook "remains rosy" driven by work-from-home demand, "we could see risk in future quarters".Overall, the rest of the Street is cautiously optimistic on the stock with a Moderate Buy analyst consensus. In light of the sharp rally this year, the $420.12 average price target indicates shares are now more than fully priced implying 1.2% downside potential to current levels. (See Apple stock analysis on TipRanks)Related News: Apple Up 6% On Blowout Quarter; Strong iPhone Demand Facebook Soars 6% After-Hours On Strong Beat, Ad Resilience Amazon Rises 5% As ‘King Of E-Commerce Shines Amidst The Pandemic’ More recent articles from Smarter Analyst: * Nio July Car Deliveries Spike 322%; Shares Up 6% In Pre-Market * Varian Pops 24% In Pre-Market On $16.4B Buyout Deal; BTIG Sticks To Buy * Immunic Spikes 35% In Pre-Market On Positive Multiple Sclerosis Data * Sanofi, GSK Nearing EU Supply Deal For 300M Covid-19 Vaccine Doses

  • MarketWatch

    Apple reportedly has purchased startup for phone payment processing: report

    Apple has purchased an online payments startup that could turn the iPhone into a payment terminal, much as Square does, according to a report. Apple has bought Montreal's Mobeewave for about $100 million, according to Bloomberg News, which cited sources. The report quoted Apple as saying it does not comment on smaller technology company purchases.

  • Apple Wants 50% UK Store Rent Discounts In Line With Deals Offered To Other Retailers By Desperate Landlords
    Benzinga

    Apple Wants 50% UK Store Rent Discounts In Line With Deals Offered To Other Retailers By Desperate Landlords

    Apple Inc (NASDAQ: AAPL) has told landlords in the United Kingdom it wants rent reductions to the tune of 50%, along with a rent-free period, the Times reported Sunday.What Happened: The discounts on rent are related to a portfolio of 38 properties in the U.K. and have reportedly caused unease among the property owners.The Cupertino-based smartphone maker's tough tactics are said to be motivated by beneficial deals that other retailers have secured from landlords struggling to keep their premises occupied during the ongoing coronavirus crisis. Apple is offering to extend leases by a few years in return for lowered rents.Why It Matters: The Tim Cook-led company's retail stores are considered to be profitable and landlords are keen to keep Apple as a tenant, the Times noted.Last week, Apple shares closed the $400 mark after the tech giant released forecast-beating results for the third quarter this financial year.The iPhone maker's revenues rose 11% year-over-year to $59.7 billion from $53.84, with product revenues making up for 78% of the total. International sales made up 60% of total revenues.The company suggested during the earnings call that the launch of its highly-anticipated iPhone 12 line, including 5G handsets, could be delayed by weeks.Cook, along with CEOs of Facebook Inc (NASDAQ: FB), Amazon.com, Inc (NASDAQ: AMZN), and Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ: GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOG), appeared before a House Antitrust Subcommittee last week to deny each of their companies' alleged monopolistic practices.Price Action: Apple shares closed almost 10.5% higher at $425.04 on Friday.See more from Benzinga * Apple Expects A Delay In iPhone 12 Series Launch * Apple Faces Fresh EU Antitrust Complaint Filed By Messaging App Telegram * Apple Under Multi-State Bipartisan Probe Over Alleged Slowing Down Of Older iPhones: Report(C) 2020 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

  • Goldman, BofA Left Off Ant IPO for Work With Alibaba Rivals
    Bloomberg

    Goldman, BofA Left Off Ant IPO for Work With Alibaba Rivals

    (Bloomberg) -- Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Bank of America Corp. were left off Ant Group’s upcoming stock sale in Hong Kong because of their past work with rivals of its affiliate Alibaba, according to people familiar with the matter.Bankers have been told by senior executives at Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., which owns a third of Ant, that they should refrain from doing deals for its competitors if they want business from Jack Ma’s sprawling empire, the people said. Ant has kicked off plans to go public in Hong Kong and Shanghai in offerings that could top Saudi Aramco’s record $29 billion IPO.The directive shows that Wall Street banks are having to make early bets on which firms to stick with in China, especially as juggernauts like Alibaba and Tencent Holdings Ltd. extend their tentacles into hundreds of businesses in finance, transportation, retail and entertainment.“The duopoly issue is not unique to China, but the scale and scope of Alibaba and Tencent’s business operations create an excruciating dilemma for investment banks,” said Andy Mok, a senior research fellow at the Center for China and Globalization in Beijing. “Alibaba and Tencent’s businesses are so big, you can risk being blocked out of a significant future revenue stream.”While bankers everywhere have to be careful doing work for their clients’ rival firms, Chinese conglomerates are taking it to a new level. Even though banks have firewalls to ensure separate teams handle deals for the likes of Alibaba and Tencent, that’s proving to not be enough, the people familiar said.Chinese clients are much more likely than their counterparts in the U.S. or Europe to demand non-compete commitments as a show of loyalty, and to ensure that sensitive strategies don’t land in the hands of competitors. And with fewer deals to go around, bankers in the hyper-competitive Chinese market have little choice but to comply.Though minor distribution roles on Ant’s Hong Kong IPO are still up for grabs, those don’t offer the out-sized fees that banks can expect from leading the sale.“Competition has increased and Chinese issuers have gotten strong bargaining power,” said Bob Dodds, who worked as an investment banker at China International Capital Corp. before setting up DRP Capital Ltd. to advise on China-related deals.Goldman and Bank of America’s recent work with Alibaba rivals include $7.7 billion in stock sales for Tencent-backed Pinduoduo Inc. and JD.com Inc. in the last two years, helping these companies build their war chests to take on their larger competitor in the hotly contested e-commerce arena.The two banks have reaped at least $70 million from advising Pinduoduo and JD.com on stock deals, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The figure doesn’t include the undisclosed fees of a $1 billion bond sale by Pinduoduo in September and the $4.5 billion secondary listing by JD.com in June.Representatives at Goldman and Bank of America declined to comment. Ant and Alibaba declined to comment in separate emailed statements.IPO BankersAnt is aggressively competing with Tencent’s WeChat Pay to maintain its dominance of China’s $29 trillion mobile payments space. It has been pitching digital payment services to the local arms of KFC Holding Co. and Marriott International Inc. as it transforms its Alipay app into an online mall for everything from loans and travel services to food delivery.Alipay’s share of mobile payments has increased for three consecutive quarters, rising to 55.1% in the fourth quarter, according to consultant iResearch. Tencent has 38.9% of the market.Ant hired Citigroup Inc., JPMorgan Chase & Co., Morgan Stanley and CICC to lead its Hong Kong IPO. The sale is expected to raise more than $10 billion and could value the firm at $200 billion, people familiar have said. Ant hasn’t selected banks for the Shanghai portion, though global firms will probably be left out because lead underwriters for any IPO on the tech-focused Star board must buy shares in the deal.Banks leading the Ant IPO in Hong Kong have fewer conflicts. While Morgan Stanley earned $6.4 million for a junior role in Pinduoduo’s stock sale last year -- about half of Goldman’s haul -- Citigroup and JPMorgan weren’t involved in those deals, Bloomberg data shows.(Adds details on Alipay and WeChat Pay’s market share in 13th paragraph. An earlier version of the story was corrected to show Ant has kicked off its IPO process.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Volante Technologies Receives $35m of Growth Funding from Leading International Investors to Accelerate Cloud Expansion Globally
    PR Newswire

    Volante Technologies Receives $35m of Growth Funding from Leading International Investors to Accelerate Cloud Expansion Globally

    Volante Technologies Inc., a leading provider of payments and financial messaging solutions in the cloud, today announced that it has raised USD 35M in growth equity financing led by Wavecrest Growth Partners with strategic participation from BNY Mellon, Citi Ventures, PostePay and Visa Inc.

  • Reuters

    Brazil's central bank says Whatsapp payment tests have begun

    Brazil's central bank said on Monday that tests had begun to trial payments via Facebook Inc's messaging service WhatsApp in the country, calling them an "important advance." In a statement, the bank said that the tests involve no real money and are not part of the Facebook, Visa Inc and Mastercard Inc's official requests to operate the payments system in Brazil.