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Aaron Judge historic home run ball could fetch up to $2 million

Yahoo Finance Live anchors discuss what could happen to Aaron Judge's record-breaking home run ball and whether the fan who caught it could be taxed.

Video Transcript

[AUDIO LOGO]

JULIE HYMAN: All right, and a big payday for the lucky baseball fan, who caught Aaron judge's that-- Aaron Judge's ball. The ball estimated to bring in $2 million at auction. As of now, the Dallas-based man that caught the ball has not decided what he wants to do with it. He could give it back to Judge and the Yankees or he could sell it himself. Another unknown is taxes. The IRS has yet to comment. But some experts speculate, catching the ball could count as a taxable--

BRIAN SOZZI: Isn't this guy a millionaire?

JULIE HYMAN: --event. That's what I was told by our team. I don't know anything about him.

BRIAN SOZZI: Well, good for him.

BRAD SMITH: Wait, so then is it a capital gains tax because you've paid for the--

BRIAN SOZZI: Sounds like he can afford it.

BRAD SMITH: --tickets to go to the game, and then now your return on that is you actually got a good bet off it.

JULIE HYMAN: I mean, I just think it's fascinating that the regulations are such that when you catch a ball it becomes your property. And one of our producers, Conor Hickey, was explaining to us, it's written on purpose that way because it absolves them of liability if you are injured by--

BRAD SMITH: Oh. [LAUGHS]

BRIAN SOZZI: Well, I think-- I think--

JULIE HYMAN: --something flying, right?

BRAD SMITH: You got hit by your property.

JULIE HYMAN: Whether it's a bat or a ball or whatever it may be.

BRIAN SOZZI: Well, I think Conor owns a lot of Mickey Mantle rookie cards. So you know, he's sitting on that dough mound.

JULIE HYMAN: Oh.

BRIAN SOZZI: He's sitting on that dough mound.

JULIE HYMAN: So he knows a lot about this.

BRIAN SOZZI: Yeah, yeah.

JULIE HYMAN: OK.

[BUZZER BUZZING]