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With aid talks stalled, lawmakers go home

As the impasse over a new coronavirus aid bill remains, and with no fresh talks scheduled with President Donald Trump’s negotiators, the U.S. Senate and House head into recess, Friday.

LARRY KUDLOW (THURSDAY): “I’ll just tell you right now it's a stalemate.”

That stalemate - affecting millions of jobless Americans whose $600-a-week enhanced unemployment benefits have run dry.

Lawmakers are not due to reconvene until next month - but members of Congress may be called back with 24 hours notice if a deal emerges.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday blamed House Democrats for the standstill:

"Republicans have been waiting and trying to pass bipartisan relief literally for weeks. I would hope our democratic colleagues will let the Senate act sometime soon.”

The Democratic-controlled House passed a $3 trillion bill in May. Senate Republicans have floated a $1 trillion response.

And last week, Democrats offered to reduce their proposal by 1 trillion dollars during negotiations with White House officials.

The White House rejected the offer.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday outlined the major differences she saw in both sides’ proposals:

“But we're not inching away from their meager piecemeal proposal with idea that the press said why can't you come to the agreement. Because we are miles apart in our values.”

Wide gaps remain on funding for schools, aid to state and local governments, and unemployment pay.

Trump on Thursday added that he opposed any money to help the U.S. Postal Service handle an expected flood of mail-in ballots for the Nov. 3 elections, though he later said he would not veto a bill that included it.

Video Transcript

- As the impasse over a new coronavirus aid bill remains and with no fresh talks scheduled with President Donald Trump's negotiators, the US Senate and House head into recess Friday.

LARRY KUDLOW: I can just tell you right now, it's a stalemate.

- That stalemate affecting millions of jobless Americans whose $600 a week enhanced unemployment benefits have run dry. Lawmakers are not due to reconvene until next month, but members of Congress may be called back with 24 hours notice if a deal emerges. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday blamed House Democrats for the standstill.

MITCH MCCONNELL: Republicans have been waiting and trying to pass bipartisan relief literally for weeks. I would hope our Democratic colleagues will let the Senate act sometime soon.

- The Democratic-controlled House passed a $3 trillion dollar in May. Senate Republicans have floated a $1 trillion response. And last week, Democrats offered to reduce their proposal by $1 trillion during negotiations with White House officials. The White House rejected the offer.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday outlined the major differences she saw in both sides' proposals.

NANCY PELOSI: But we're not inching away from their meager piecemeal proposal with the idea that the press says why can't you come to agreement? Because we are miles apart in our values.

- Wide gaps remain on funding for schools, aid to state and local governments, and unemployment pay. Trump on Thursday added that he opposed any money to help the US Postal Service handle an expected flood of mail-in ballots for the November 3 elections, though he later said he would not veto a bill that included it.

DONALD TRUMP: No, not at all.