U.S. markets open in 7 hours 6 minutes
  • S&P Futures

    3,939.50
    +2.75 (+0.07%)
     
  • Dow Futures

    33,652.00
    +27.00 (+0.08%)
     
  • Nasdaq Futures

    11,513.75
    +4.25 (+0.04%)
     
  • Russell 2000 Futures

    1,810.70
    +2.70 (+0.15%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    73.07
    +1.06 (+1.47%)
     
  • Gold

    1,797.10
    -0.90 (-0.05%)
     
  • Silver

    22.90
    -0.02 (-0.10%)
     
  • EUR/USD

    1.0524
    +0.0010 (+0.09%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    3.4080
    0.0000 (0.00%)
     
  • Vix

    22.68
    +0.51 (+2.30%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.2207
    +0.0002 (+0.01%)
     
  • USD/JPY

    136.7560
    +0.2320 (+0.17%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    16,837.20
    +18.34 (+0.11%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    395.28
    -6.75 (-1.68%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    7,489.19
    -32.20 (-0.43%)
     
  • Nikkei 225

    27,574.43
    -111.97 (-0.40%)
     

How El Chapo and other lawbreakers are like the ‘underground equivalent of successful business people’

'Rogues' author, Patrick Radden Keefe, joins 'Influencers with Andy Serwer' to weigh the similarities between criminal masterminds and top corporate executives.

Video Transcript

ANDY SERWER: Have you ever thought about how closely related, or not, successful business people are to successful criminals?

PATRICK RADDEN KEEFE: I think about it all the time. And it's actually a theme that sort of runs through this book is that a lot of these people are-- yeah, they're sort of the underworld equivalent of successful business people. They are people who approach what they do as a business. One of the big stories that kind of set me off on this path, and it's not in this collection-- there is a story about the hunt for El Chapo Guzman in this collection.

But the first time I wrote about the Sinaloa cartel was actually a cover story for the "New York Times" Magazine 10 years ago. And my pitch to them was I want to write a Harvard Business School case study of a Mexican drug cartel. We think of them primarily as a criminal gang, but they think of themselves as this big commodities business.

And how do they use violence? How do they use corruption? You know, how do they account for bribery? How do they invest their proceeds? How do they move them? What do you do when you can't resort to the courts in order to resolve disputes with business rivals or partners? And all of those questions have always been really intriguing to me.