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FDA authorizes Omicron booster shots for children as young as six months old

Yahoo Finance health care reporter Anjalee Khemlani outlines the FDA's latest authorization of COVID-19 booster shots developed to protect young children from the Omicron variant.

Video Transcript

SEANA SMITH: Well, the FDA has authorized Omicron targeted boosters for children as young as six months old. Yahoo Finance's Anjalee Khemlani has the details. Hey, Anj.

ANJALEE KHEMLANI: Hey, that's right. So we know that, of course, right now, we are in the middle of possibly another COVID wave, with the FDA now allowing, finally, just in time, almost, really, the youngest population of the US to get these boosters. The Omicron-specific bivalent boosters now eligible for those under five, up to six months.

And this really clears the track for the FDA to start looking at what is next, which is a discussion that is really needed for pan coronavirus or other types of delivery, like nasal sprays, which we are seeing around the world. So this frees up the FDA to start looking in that path, but good news, of course, for the youngest population.

DAVE BRIGGS: Oh, I'm just-- I'm not ready to go back. So we've got some more numbers. The flu, RSV, and COVID, we call it the "triple-demic."

ANJALEE KHEMLANI: Yep.

DAVE BRIGGS: On the rise. We've got some new CDC recommendations as related to this. Are we going back to the masks?

ANJALEE KHEMLANI: Well, there's not going to be a mandate. That's where we're at, where it's highly recommended. Specifically in a call with reporters, a CDC official did say, quote, that there is guidance to consider using a well-fitted mask, particularly in large, public, crowded settings, when we know there's elevated respiratory virus circulating.

And we know that that's kind of what's happening in some parts of the country. We know LA is reconsidering a mask mandate. But really seeing a nationwide mask mandate is what is unlikely. But we might see it pop up in some of the major cities-- New York, LA, and the like.

DAVE BRIGGS: That would be greeted with a really open arms across the country if you tried to go back to a mandate.

ANJALEE KHEMLANI: Yeah, definitely.

DAVE BRIGGS: Anjalee Khemlani, great to see you.