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Joe Biden's first 25 days of presidency

Yahoo Finance's Chief Political Correspondent Jessica Smith takes a look at what the first 25 days of Joe Biden's presidency has looked like and the actions he has taken thus far.

Video Transcript

JESSICA SMITH: President Joe Biden's first 25 days in office have been dominated by the COVID-19 pandemic. From his very first executive action requiring masks on federal property, the new president has tried to show defeating the virus is his top priority.

JOE BIDEN: And I'm going to start today on the compounding crisis of COVID.

JESSICA SMITH: The White House says it's on track to meet its target of 100 million vaccinations in the first 100 days. But some critics say the administration's goals for reopening schools are too low.

JEN PSAKI: His goal that he set is to have the majority of schools-- so more than 50%-- open by day 100 of his presidency-- and that means some teaching in classrooms, so at least one day a week.

JESSICA SMITH: So far, the new president has signed more than 40 executive actions, from rejoining the Paris Climate Accord and pausing student loan payments to revoking the permit for the Keystone XL pipeline. The rush of executive orders prompted questions about how the former Senator plans to reach across the aisle and work with Congress, as he promised in the campaign.

JEN PSAKI: But he's the first to tell you, as he's said many times publicly, he's not going to take executive action alone.

JESSICA SMITH: Biden's cabinet is taking shape. Several historic nominees have been confirmed with bipartisan support, but former President Trump's impeachment trial loomed over the first weeks of Biden's presidency. Though seven Republicans joined Democrats to vote against Trump, it wasn't enough to convict him.

JAMIE RASKIN: This was the most bipartisan presidential impeachment in the history of the United States.

JESSICA SMITH: Now, Congress will focus on passing the president's COVID relief plan.

JOE BIDEN: American people are hurting. There's a lot of people that are in real, real trouble.

JESSICA SMITH: Biden's first Oval Office meeting with lawmakers featured Senate Republicans, who tried and failed to sell him on a stimulus package much smaller than his $1.9 trillion plan. The president says he wants to work across the aisle on a relief deal, but he's not waiting around.

JOE BIDEN: What Republicans have proposed is easier to do nothing or not enough.

JESSICA SMITH: Democrats are gearing up to pass a stimulus package with no Republican support and a tie-breaking vote from Vice President Kamala Harris. They'll likely use the same mechanism the GOP used to pass tax cuts in 2017. But Republicans now argue the move is at odds with Biden's promise of unity.

JOHN THUNE: It's not enough to talk about unity. It has to be matched with action. If they really wanted to govern for all Americans, they would work with Republicans to pass yet another bipartisan COVID bill.

JESSICA SMITH: The 50/50 split in the Senate means any one Senator can derail the bill, putting moderates in the spotlight.

JOE MANCHIN: But we ought to try to do what we can do in a bipartisan way.

JESSICA SMITH: In the president's first major legislative test, lawmakers are racing to get the relief package to his desk before mid-March, when more than 11 million people are set to lose unemployment aid. In Washington, I'm Jessica Smith.