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More Americans want their coffee to taste like candy

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Yahoo Finance Live looks at the rising trend of candy and snack flavored coffee as a study reports daily coffee drinkers live longer on average than compared non-coffee drinkers.

Video Transcript

JARED BLIKRE: The market shows that more Americans want coffee, and they want it to taste like candy. Snickers, Cinnabon, and Twinkie-flavored coffee creamers are on the shelves across the country. Is that what people are drinking, Seana?

SEANA SMITH: You know, I don't know. I don't know how I feel about this. But I love coffee. I'm a big believer in coffee. I never miss my coffee. I don't know how I feel about having a candy that tastes like coffee, not something that's necessarily up my alley here. But Jared, while we're speaking of coffee because there was actually an interesting study that was out this week. If you drink 1 and 1/2 to 3 and 1/2 cups of coffee per day-- do you fall in that category?

JARED BLIKRE: No, not anymore.

SEANA SMITH: Do you drink more or less?

JARED BLIKRE: Less, zero almost.

SEANA SMITH: OK.

JARED BLIKRE: But not today.

SEANA SMITH: Interesting.

JARED BLIKRE: Interesting story here, but go.

SEANA SMITH: OK, this says, even with a teaspoon of sugar, you are up to 30% less likely to die during the study period than those who didn't drink coffee. So I think there's a lot of concern out there from the coffee drinkers that maybe they're drinking a little bit too much. Maybe it's not healthy for you. This study actually shows that you're less likely to die. So what else do you need?

JARED BLIKRE: Yeah, I think, you know, lies, damned lies and statistics, that's kind of the genre that I fit in here. You know, I've seen a lot of these studies over the years. A famous one-- and there are so many of these-- alcohol, people who consume moderate amounts of alcohol live a little bit longer.

But I think it speaks as to cofactors. If you drink coffee, maybe you're just a more productive person anyway. You can afford higher-- better health coverage. You have better nutrition. I think if you were to take a holistic view of some of these studies, you would find that we're just kind of getting the result maybe that we were looking for in the first place that we wanted to hear.

SEANA SMITH: Interesting, but you still-- you're not a coffee drinker?

JARED BLIKRE: Not anymore. I can't take it. It gets me jittery.

SEANA SMITH: OK, all right. Well, I'm a big coffee drinker. One to two cups, I would say, per day-- at least two cups. Who am I kidding? [INAUDIBLE] All right, Jared, thanks so--

JARED BLIKRE: [INAUDIBLE]

SEANA SMITH: I know.