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More GOP voters shifted bases in 2020 election: Exit Polls

Yahoo Finance's Rick Newman joins Kristin Myers to break down why some of Trump's key voting base shifted over to Biden.

Video Transcript

KRISTIN MYERS: Let's talk now about the elections and a crucial Trump voting bloc that actually drifted over to Joe Biden-- it is working class voters. We have Yahoo Finance's Rick Newman here to chat more about it. Hey, Rick. So this is actually surprising, since we had seen Trump stumping in so many areas trying to appeal to working class voters.

RICK NEWMAN: I mean, this has been the core of the so-called Trump base. So Trump worked really hard, not just to keep those voters motivated, but to try to turn out more of them. We're finally seeing some exit poll data that shows, you know, who voted for whom, really.

And according to a breakdown by William Frey at the Brookings Institution, Biden improved with white working class voters, defined as white men and women without a college degree, in most of the swing states. And in some of the swing states, his margin of improvement over what Hillary Clinton got in 2016 was substantial. It was in the double digits.

This is really important, because Biden lost votes compared with Clinton among black and Hispanic voters, as you were discussing in the prior segment. So Biden really underperformed with that group, and he would have lost, I think, if he didn't do better than Clinton did among white working class voters.

So we don't know the exact reasons, but there were some members of the so-called Trump base that just got fed up with Trump and went over to Biden.

KRISTIN MYERS: I was going to ask. You just said there's no specific reasons, but do you have any thoughts about what appealed to those white working class voters about a President Joe Biden?

RICK NEWMAN: I mean, I think we have to be really careful about making inferences here, especially since, I mean, the polls were so wrong again, and this is based on polling data. So I can guess. I don't know if it's true.

First of all, Biden did deliberately try to appeal to white working class Americans. I mean, we know how he kept, you know, reminding everybody he grew up in hardscrabble Scranton, Pennsylvania. He comes from a working class family. He'd talked about it all the time. He's got a lot of support among the unions.

You know, to some extent, what Biden had to do was just improve on Hillary Clinton's performance in 2016. And she did-- she did very poorly among this group, so.

You know, I think Biden went to the swing states. And I think that he-- that he gave a message that was basically, look, Trump said he was going to look out for the forgotten men and women of America. He hasn't. We have this virus. It's running unchecked. You know, manufacturing never took off the way Trump promised. You gave Trump a shot last time, why don't you give me a shot this time? Biden did not win majorities of white working class voters, but again, he picked off enough of them that it looks like it was the margin of difference in the swing states.

KRISTIN MYERS: All right, well, we'll have to leave that there. Yahoo Finance's Rick Newman. Thanks so much.

RICK NEWMAN: See ya.