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Poll: Biden beats Trump by 10 pts on likely voters

According to a new poll from Quinnipiac, Biden beat President Trump by ten points on likely voters. Yahoo Finance’s Rick Newman joins The Final Round to discuss why Trump’s campaigning hasn’t been able to convince voters for the upcoming 2020 election.

Video Transcript

SEANA SMITH: Rick, I also want to get your quick thoughts on this new Quinnipiac Poll that we got out today. And the numbers, they don't look that good for President Trump. It shows that the GOP convention didn't really help Trump, and also that maybe his law and order appeal isn't working as much as he hoped it would, at least.

RICK NEWMAN: Yeah, exactly. So Quinnipiac found Biden is ahead of Trump. This is a national poll, not a swing state poll. But Biden ahead of Trump, 52 points to 42 percent. So that's a 10-point margin.

That is around where it was before we had both conventions, so that is telling you that there really was no convention bounce for President Trump. There are a lot of polls. But I think it's important looking after-- at these right after the convention, because sometimes there is that convention bounce. You mentioned that people actually give Trump relatively low marks for law and order and Biden beats him out a little bit there. That's the opposite of what President Trump is trying to accomplish.

Just one more thing I'll point to-- the percentage they asked do you feel better off or worse off than four years ago, Democrats feel worse off. Republicans feel better off. That's no surprise.

But the portion of independents saying they feel worse off is 60%. And only 36% of independents say they're better off. That's very ominous for President Trump, because those independents are-- account for some of the swing voters who are going to determine who wins this year. So more bad news for President Trump.

ANDY SERWER: Rick, it seems like we hear a lot about a lot of different polls. And it seems like there's sort of a couple of problems in a lot of different polls. And then President Trump just lies about polls.

So it's really hard to cut through the clutter. Maybe that's just a statement rather than a question. But the question, I guess, are some polls better than other polls? And we know Quinnipiac is pretty established. So others like that?

RICK NEWMAN: Absolutely. So there are polls of likely voters, people who are actually likely to vote. So that may tell you that this ought to mirror the outcome pretty closely. Then there are polls of registered voters, not certain they're going to vote, but pretty close. And then there are polls of just adult Americans, whether they are likely to vote or not. Those are the least accurate.

There's some aggregation sites. People should check out Real Clear Politics. They do an aggregation of polls. That shows Biden leading by about seven points on average.

And then FiveThirtyEight also does an aggregation. And in addition to that, they actually rank the quality of the polls. And you can click on each of the polls they include in their averages and see is it really good methodology, moderate, or fishy methodology?

SEANA SMITH: Only have what, eight or nine more weeks of this. We're going to be getting a lot more poll results over the next couple weeks. All right, Rick Newman, thanks so much for breaking all that down for us.