U.S. markets closed
  • S&P 500

    3,825.33
    +39.95 (+1.06%)
     
  • Dow 30

    31,097.26
    +321.83 (+1.05%)
     
  • Nasdaq

    11,127.84
    +99.11 (+0.90%)
     
  • Russell 2000

    1,727.76
    +19.77 (+1.16%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    108.46
    +2.70 (+2.55%)
     
  • Gold

    1,812.90
    +5.60 (+0.31%)
     
  • Silver

    19.77
    -0.51 (-2.50%)
     
  • EUR/USD

    1.0426
    -0.0057 (-0.54%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    2.8890
    -0.0830 (-2.79%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.2103
    -0.0072 (-0.59%)
     
  • USD/JPY

    135.1750
    -0.5530 (-0.41%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    19,032.05
    -268.38 (-1.39%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    420.84
    +0.70 (+0.17%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    7,168.65
    -0.63 (-0.01%)
     
  • Nikkei 225

    25,935.62
    -457.42 (-1.73%)
     
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

What Sheryl Sandberg’s departure means for women in tech

In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Senior tech editor Dan Howley details what Sheryl Sandberg's exit from Meta may mean for female executives in the tech world, what other women in the space have accomplished, and representation in Silicon Valley leadership.

Video Transcript

DAVE BRIGGS: Meta now facing some big questions as the company plans to move ahead without its superstar, COO Sheryl Sandberg. But her departure begs an even bigger question about women and the tech industry and more than a decade of progress in Silicon Valley. Yahoo Finance's Dan Howley here with where we go from there. And was there much progress after Sheryl Sandberg came forward?

DAN HOWLEY: Yeah, it's interesting, right? Because Sheryl Sandberg was obviously or is obviously known as-- for her "Lean In" book and her foundation, pushing that women kind of making their own space in corporate America. She obviously did that very well herself at both Meta and Google, Alphabet, however you want to refer to it. But it is-- it does beg the question of what impact did she have on the broader industries that we see, especially with Silicon Valley and female executives.

And really, it doesn't feel as though we have seen that much growth since she came on in 2008. We actually have a graphic showing the various CEOs and CFOs, SVPs. You obviously have there Ruth Porat. She's the CFO at Google, Alphabet. Lisa Su doing an incredible job over at AMD. Amy Hood, the CFO on Microsoft. If you listen to any of the earnings calls for those companies, you'll hear them constantly.

So, you know, obviously, these are big names in big heavy hitting positions at some of the largest companies in Silicon Valley. But the fact that you can talk about that number of women in those roles, I mean, it just doesn't feel as though there-- doesn't feel-- they're clearly not as equally represented as men in these roles. I mean, you can look up any of their executive members' pages, and the men are going to outnumber the women easily each time. So, as much as she did change the perception, I think, of Silicon Valley, she still is one of the few executives that actually was female at that point.

SEANA SMITH: Yeah, and it's so critical here, just in terms of building the pipeline of female talent. So you have one or two people at the head or in the C-suite, but you still need people at the lower management positions or the-- even the analyst positions of entry level positions. Has there been one company or a group of companies that have been the leader on the forefront of this, just in terms of either various programs that they have established at their company or different measures that they are using, just in order to keep up and try to improve that statistic?

DAN HOWLEY: I think a lot of them say that they want to do that. And whenever there's a big hire in those positions, they will point it out. But I don't necessarily think that any one company is doing an incredible job versus others. We do-- obviously, we point out the numbers that we have or the main players that we have from the big tech companies right now. But it just doesn't feel as though one company is doing an outstanding job compared to the rest of the pack. It still feels very much kind of piecemeal at this point.