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Trump, Biden make final push to the polls

As Wall Street and investors nervously await to see how the market will respond to election volatility, President Trump and former Vice President Biden are doing last-minute campaigning in some key states. The Yahoo Finance Live panel breaks down the details.

Video Transcript

JULIE HYMAN: Our Jessica Smith covers all things Washington for us. And she's joining us now. So, Jess, in the final push here, the focus is really going to be on the swing states. And to that end, the candidates are making some last-minute appearances there.

JESSICA SMITH: Exactly. Both President Trump and former President-- former Vice President Joe Biden-- are making their final pitches to voters in these very important swing states today. Former Vice President Biden will spend his day in Ohio and in Pennsylvania. While President Trump will be campaigning in North Carolina, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania. The vice presidential candidates are also spending their days in Pennsylvania as well. So clearly, Pennsylvania is a very important state for both of these campaigns.

And a new Monmouth poll has Biden with a 5-to-7-point lead over President Trump. That is a 5-point lead if there is a low voter turnout, and a 7-point lead in a high voter turnout scenario. That is a more narrow lead than what he held in this poll last month. Now, President Trump told reporters yesterday that he's preparing for legal challenges to the counting of mail and absentee ballots in Pennsylvania. Let's watch.

DONALD TRUMP: I think it's a terrible thing when people or states are allowed to tabulate ballots for a long period of time after the election is over. Because it can only lead to one thing, and that's very bad.

JOE BIDEN: Every day is a new reminder of how high the stakes are. Of how far the other side will go to try to suppress the turnout. Especially here in Philadelphia. President Trump is terrified of what will happen in Pennsylvania. He knows the people of Pennsylvania get to have their say. If you have your say, he doesn't stand a chance.

JESSICA SMITH: The Pennsylvania attorney general did respond to President Trump, saying that the election is over when all the votes are counted. And he is prepared to take the President Trump in court, if necessary. Now, it is important to note that [INAUDIBLE] chance we don't know who won the election by tomorrow night. More people are voting by mail this year because of the pandemic. And those ballots take longer to count than votes cast at polling places.

So when the initial results come in, they could shift, depending on when those mail-in ballots are counted. Because traditionally, more Democrats vote by mail than Republicans. FiveThirtyEight put together this map, you can see here, showing how much of the vote is expected to be counted on election night. The darker states on this map will have most of their results in by tomorrow night, while the lighter will only have some of their results.

I'll point out that FiveThirtyEight says we should know the winner in Wisconsin by Wednesday morning. But Michigan and Pennsylvania could take until the end of the week. So it could be a few days here of trying to figure out what exactly is going to happen and who won the White House. Julie.

JULIE HYMAN: Thank you, Jess. And just to be clear, of course, the fact that votes will still be counted through the end of the week, and even maybe beyond, is not necessarily unusual. It's also not illegal. It's something that is baked into the election rules, just to be clear on that point.