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UPDATE 1-Haleon not a party to U.S. litigation focused on Zantac - spokesperson

·1 min read

(Adds details)

By Natalie Grover

LONDON, Aug 11 (Reuters) - Haleon - GSK's recently spun off consumer health unit - is not a party to U.S. litigation focused on the heartburn medicine Zantac, a spokesperson told Reuters on Thursday.

"We have never marketed Zantac in any form in the U.S., as Haleon or as GSK consumer healthcare," the spokesperson said, responding to Reuters querying a near-20% decline in Haleon's share price this week.

The spokesperson said the drug has been sold by several companies since 1995 and that "may make third parties liable ahead of any Haleon exposure."

Zantac was marketed by GSK between 1995 and 1998, by Pfizer from 2000 to 2006, by Johnson & Johnson from 2006 to 2017, and by Sanofi between 2017 and 2019, Redburn analysts wrote in a note.

GSK and Pfizer have each served Haleon with notice of potential claims of indemnification - but indemnification has not yet been determined between the parties, the Haleon spokesperson said.

Given Haleon was formed in 2019 and became an independently listed business only last month, the company "is not primarily liable for any claim," the spokesperson added.

(Reporting by Natalie Grover in London;)