U.S. Markets closed
  • S&P 500

    3,298.46
    +51.87 (+1.60%)
     
  • Nasdaq

    10,913.56
    +241.26 (+2.26%)
     
  • Russell 2000

    1,474.91
    +23.09 (+1.59%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    40.04
    -0.27 (-0.67%)
     
  • Gold

    1,864.30
    -12.60 (-0.67%)
     
  • Silver

    22.99
    -0.21 (-0.91%)
     
  • EUR/USD

    1.1639
    -0.0037 (-0.3142%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    0.6590
    -0.0070 (-1.05%)
     
  • Vix

    26.38
    -2.13 (-7.47%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.2744
    -0.0007 (-0.0586%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    10,770.69
    +73.70 (+0.69%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    230.19
    +12.36 (+5.67%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    5,842.67
    +19.89 (+0.34%)
     
  • Nikkei 225

    23,204.62
    +116.80 (+0.51%)
     

U.S. Concrete, Inc. (NASDAQ:USCR) Not Lagging Market On Growth Or Pricing

Simply Wall St

U.S. Concrete, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:USCR) price-to-earnings (or "P/E") ratio of 29x might make it look like a strong sell right now compared to the market in the United States, where around half of the companies have P/E ratios below 17x and even P/E's below 9x are quite common. Although, it's not wise to just take the P/E at face value as there may be an explanation why it's so lofty.

Recent times haven't been advantageous for U.S. Concrete as its earnings have been falling quicker than most other companies. It might be that many expect the dismal earnings performance to recover substantially, which has kept the P/E from collapsing. If not, then existing shareholders may be very nervous about the viability of the share price.

Check out our latest analysis for U.S. Concrete

pe
pe

Want the full picture on analyst estimates for the company? Then our free report on U.S. Concrete will help you uncover what's on the horizon.

Does Growth Match The High P/E?

There's an inherent assumption that a company should far outperform the market for P/E ratios like U.S. Concrete's to be considered reasonable.

Retrospectively, the last year delivered a frustrating 53% decrease to the company's bottom line. The last three years don't look nice either as the company has shrunk EPS by 49% in aggregate. So unfortunately, we have to acknowledge that the company has not done a great job of growing earnings over that time.

Shifting to the future, estimates from the eight analysts covering the company suggest earnings should grow by 32% per year over the next three years. That's shaping up to be materially higher than the 12% per year growth forecast for the broader market.

With this information, we can see why U.S. Concrete is trading at such a high P/E compared to the market. Apparently shareholders aren't keen to offload something that is potentially eyeing a more prosperous future.

The Final Word

While the price-to-earnings ratio shouldn't be the defining factor in whether you buy a stock or not, it's quite a capable barometer of earnings expectations.

We've established that U.S. Concrete maintains its high P/E on the strength of its forecast growth being higher than the wider market, as expected. At this stage investors feel the potential for a deterioration in earnings isn't great enough to justify a lower P/E ratio. It's hard to see the share price falling strongly in the near future under these circumstances.

It is also worth noting that we have found 4 warning signs for U.S. Concrete (1 doesn't sit too well with us!) that you need to take into consideration.

You might be able to find a better investment than U.S. Concrete. If you want a selection of possible candidates, check out this free list of interesting companies that trade on a P/E below 20x (but have proven they can grow earnings).

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

Have feedback on this article? Concerned about the content? Get in touch with us directly. Alternatively, email editorial-team@simplywallst.com.